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Full text of "Haverford College Bulletins, 1970-72"

Digitized by tine Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/haverfordcollege1972have 



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O U GtCtIjiO i that you preach truth and do 
righteousness as you have been taught, 
whereinsoever that teaching may commend itself to 
your consciences and your judgments. For your 
consciences and your judgments we have not sought to 
bind; and see you to it that no other institution, no 
poHtical party, no social circle, no religious organization, 
no pet ambitions put such chains on you as would 
tempt you to sacrifice one iota of the moral freedom of your 
consciences or the intellectual freedom 
of your judgments." 

Tresident Isaac <5harpless, 
Commencement, 1888 




laverford College seeks to prepare men for lives of service, respon- 
sibility, creativity, and joy, both during and after college. 

The College shares with other liberal arts colleges of academic 
excellence: 

— a commitment to open inquiry by both its students and faculty, 
combined with rigorous appraisal and use of the results of that 
inquiry 

— an emphasis on a broad education in the natural and social 
sciences, the humanities, and the arts, combined with strong 
competence in at least one field of the student's choosing 

— an educational program that aims more at preparing men to 
think and act clearly, boldly, and humanely in whatever life 
work they choose than at training for specific professional 
fields. 

The College's distinctive character comes from its striving for: 

— candor, simplicity, joy, and moral integrity in the whole of 
college life in keeping with Haverford's Quaker traditions 

— a harmony for each man among his intellectual, physical, social, 
esthetic, and spiritual concerns 

— a creative use of smallness that places students in the closest 
contact with dedicated scholars in the pursuit of knowledge 

— a sense of community marked by a lasting concern of one per- 
son for another and by shared responsibilities for helping the 
College achieve its highest aims 

— a system of responsible self-government in the student body 
and in the faculty 

— a balance for students and faculty between disciplined involve- 
ment in the world of action and detachment to reflect on new 
and old knowledge alike. 

In sum, the College seeks to be measured, above all, by the uses to 
which its students, graduates, and faculty put their knowledge, their 
humanity, their initiative, and their individuality. 

1 




Haverford College Publication, Vol. 68, No. 4, August, 1970 

Issued six times a year by Haverford College, Haverford, Pa. 19041: 
January, February, May, August, September and December. Entered 
as second-class matter and postage paid at Haverford, Pa. 



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CONTEIMTS 

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE 1 

COLLEGE CALENDAR, 1970-71 5 

FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION 11 

THE COLLEGE AND ITS PROGRAM 29 

Purpose 30 

History 31 

Resources 32 

Admission 40 

Expenses 42 

Financial Aid 43 

Curriculum 45 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 69 

Departments 71 

Special Programs of Instruction 165 

STUDENT SERVICES AND ACTIVITIES 179 

Health Program 180 

Counseling Services 181 

Student Government, Honor System 181 

Student Organizations and Publications 183 

Community Concern 184 

FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 185 

Endowed Fellowships 186 

Endowed Scholarships 186 

Prizes 193 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 200 

Alumni Clubs 201 

INDEX 213 

CORRESPONDENCE DIRECTORY 218 

MAP Inside rear cover 

The contents of this catalog are designed to cover a two-year 
period, 1970-72. A supplement containing updated information will 
be issued in the fall of 1971. Additional current information is 
available at any time from the appropriate college office; please see 
the correspondence directory at the back of this catalog. 



T *f T F 



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College days in BLACK 



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Haverford College 



CALENDAR 1970-1971 



Freshmen arrive Tues. 8 

Other new students arrive Thurs. 10 

New and re-entering students register for academic courses Fri. 1 1 

Returning students arrive Sat. 

Opening Collection 8:00 p.m., Sun. 

First Semester classes begin 8:00 a.m., Mon. 

Upperclassmen register for non-academic courses Mon. 

First faculty meeting 4:15 p.m., Mon. 

Fall term non-academic courses begin Wed. 



12 


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14 


T. 


14 




16 





Last day for changing courses 


. . . Mon. 


28 


Last day for dropping a course without penalty 

Last day to request no-numerical-grade option (juniors and seniors) . . 


. . . Mon. 
. . . Mon. 


12 
12 *' 



Christmas vacation ends — Review period begins 8:00 a.m., Mon. 4 

All papers (except those in lieu of examinations) due by*. . . .4:00 p.m., Wed. 6 

Midyear examinations Thurs. 7 through Sat. 16 

Papers in lieil of examinations (and laboratory notebooks) 

due as scheduled by instructor, but not later than* 4:00 p.m.. Wed. 13 

Midyear Recess 5:00 p.m., Sat. 16 to 8:00 a.m., Mon. 25 

Second semester classes begin 8:00 a.m., Mon. 25 

Last day for changing courses Mon. 8 

Last day for dropping a course without penalty Mon. 22 

Last day to request no-numerical-grade option (juniors and seniors) . . . .Mon. 22 

Winter term non-academic courses end Fri. 26 

Applications for Cope and Murray Graduate Fellowships 

due in President's office Sat. 27 



Fall term non-academic courses end Fri. 20 

Swarthmore Day (no classes) Sat. 21 N 

Registration for Winter term non-academic courses Mon. 23 

Thanksgiving vacation begins 12:30 p.m., Wed. 25 V. 

Classes resume and Winter term non-academic courses begin. .8:00 a.m., Mon. 30 

Registration for Spring semester Mon. 30 through Fri. 4 D 

Midyear examination schedules due in Recorder's office Mon., Tues. 7, 8 E 

First semester classes end — Christmas vacation begins 11:30 a.m.. Sat. 19 C. 



Registration for Spring term non-academic courses Mon. 1 M 

Spring term non-academic courses begin Mon. 8 A 

Spring vacation 4:00 p.m., Thurs. 18 to 8:00 a.m., Mon. 29 R. 

Sophomores' major registration cards due in 

Associate Dean's office 4:00 p.m., Fri. 9 . 

Registration for Fall semester Mon. 12 through Fri. 16 _ 

Applications for scholarships due in Admissions office Wed. 14 

Final examination schedules and Registration for Fall semester 

due in Recorder's office Mon. 19 through Fri. 23 

Prize competition manuscripts due in Recorder's office 4:00 p.m., Fri. 30 

Spring term non-academic courses end Fri. 7 

Second semester classes end — Review period begins 11:30 a.m.. Sat. 8 

All papers (except those in lieu of examinations) due by*. . . . 12:00 noon. Sat. 8 

Senior comprehensive examinations Tues. 11 through Thurs. 13 

Final examinations for seniors Wed. 12 through 12:00 noon, Wed. 19 ^ 

Final examinations for all other students Wed. 12 through Sat. 22 ^ 

Papers in lieu of examinations (and laboratory notebooks) 

due as scheduled by instructor, but no later than* 4:00 p.m., Tues. 18 

Oral examinations for College honors Mon., Tues., Wed. 17, 18, 19 

Final faculty meeting 9:00 a.m., Thurs. 20 

COMMENCEMENT Tues. 25 



Parents' Day — Oct. 3 



SPECIAL SATURDAY EVENTS 

Homecoming Day — Nov. 14 



Alumni Day — May 1 



^'For severe academic penalties applied to late papers and notebooks, see Page 62. 



FACULTY 

AND 

ADMIIMISTRATIOIM 




FACULTY 

John R. Coleman President 

B.A., University of Toronto; M.A., and Ph.D., University of Chicago; LL.D., 
Beaver College; LL.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

EMERITI 

Manuel J. Asensio Professor of Romance Languages, Emeritus 

B.A., University of Granada; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Hugh Borton President, Emeritus 

B.S., Haverford College; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., University of 
Leyden; LL.D., Temple University; LL.D., University of Pennsylvania; LL.D., 
Haverford College. 

Howard Comfort Professor of Classics, Emeritus 

B.A., Haverford College; A.M. and Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Thomas E. Drake Professor of American History, Emeritus 

A.B., Stanford University; A.M., University of Michigan; Ph.D., Yale 
University. 

Clayton W. Holmes Professor of Engineering, Emeritus 

B.S. in M.E. and M.E., University of New Hampshire; M.A., Haverford 
College. 

Archibald Macintosh .... Vice President and Director of Admissions, Emeritus 
B.A., Haverford College; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania; LL.D., Haverford College. 

Cletus O. Oakley Professor of Mathematics, Emeritus 

S.B., University of Texas; S.M., Brown University; Ph.D., University of 
Illinois. 

Abraham Pepinsky Professor of Psychology, Emeritus 

A.B. and A.M., University of Minnesota; Ph.D., State University of Iowa. 

Harry W. Pfund Professor of German, Emeritus 

B.A., Haverford College; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

L. Arnold Post Professor of Greek, Emeritus 

B.A. and M.A., Haverford College; A.M., Harvard University; B.A. and 
M.A., Oxford University; L.H.D., Haverford College. 

Roy E. Randall Professor of Physical Education and 

Director of Intercollegiate Athletics, Emeritus 
Ph.B., Brown University. 

Leon H. Rittenhouse Professor of Engineering, Emeritus 

M.E., Stevens Institute of Technology. 

Ralph M. Sargent Francis B. Gummere Professor of English, Emeritus 

A.B., Carleton College; Ph.D., Yale University. 

Edward D. Snyder Professor of English, Emeritus 

A.B., Yale University; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

12 



i 



Douglas Van Steere T. Wistar Brown Professor of Philosophy, Emeritus 

S.B., Michigan State College; B.A. and M.A.^ Oxford University; A.M. and 
Ph.D., Harvard University; D.D., Lawrence College; L.H.D., Oberlin College; 
L.H.D., Earlham College; S.T.D., General Theological Seminary. 

Alfred J. Swan Professor of Music, Emeritus 

B.A. and M.A., Oxford University. 

Howard M. Teaf, Jr Professor of Economics, Emeritus 

B.S. in Economics, M.A. and Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

PROFESSORS 

Manuel J. AsENSiottt Professor of Romance Languages 

B.A., University of Granada; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

John Ashmead, Jr.**''= Professor of English 

A.B., A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Richard J. Bernstein Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., University of Chicago; B.S., Columbia University; M.A. and Ph.D., 

Yale University. 

Edwin B. Bronner Professor of History 

A.B., Whittier College; M.A., Haverford College; Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania. 

Robert H. Butman Director of Drama with rank of Professor 

on joint appointment with Bryn Mawr College 
B.A. and M.A., University of North Carolina. 

William E. Cadbury, Jr.**** Director, Post-Baccalaureate 

Fellowship Program and Professor of Chemistry 
B.S. and M.A., Haverford College; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

John R. Cary Professor of German 

B.A., Haverford College; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 

John P. Chesick*** Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Purdue University; Ph.D., Harvard University. 

William C. Davidon* Professor of Physics 

B.S., M.S. and Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

John W. Davison Professor of Music 

B.A., Haverford College; A.M., Harvard University; Ph.D., University of 
Rochester. 

Frances De Graaff* Professor of Russian 

on joint appointment with Bryn Mawr College 
Ph.D., University of Leyden. 

*On sabbatical leave, first semester, 1970-71. 
***On sabbatical leave, 1970-71. 
****On leave of absence, 1970-71. 
tttOn appointment, 1970-71. 

13 



Paul J. R. Desjardins* Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., M.A. and Ph.D., Yale University. 

William Docherty, Jr Professor of Physical Education and 

Director of Physical Education 
S.B., Temple University. 

Harmon C. Dunathan*=^* Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University; M.S. and Ph.D., Yale University. 

Irving Finger*** Professor of Biology 

B.A., Swarthmore College; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Harvey Glickman** Professor of Political Science 

and Director of African Studies 
A.B., Princeton University; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Louis C. Green Professor of Astronomy 

A.B., A.M. and Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Marcel M. Gutwirth Professor of Romance Languages 

A.B., Columbia College; A.M. and Ph.D., Columbia University. 

Norman B. Hannah Diplomat-in-Residence 

with rank of Professor 
B.A., University of Illinois; M.A., Louisiana State University. 

A. Paul Hare Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Swarthmore College; B.S., Iowa State University; M.A., University of 
Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Douglas H. Heath**** Professor of Psychology 

A.B., Amherst College; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Theodore B. Hetzel Professor of Engineering 

B.S., Haverford College; B.S. in M.E., University of Pennsylvania; M.S. and 
Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 

Holland Hunter Professor of Economics 

B.S., Haverford College; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Dale H. Husemoller Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., University of Minnesota; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

John A. Lester, Jr Professor of English 

B.S., Haverford College; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Ariel G. Loewy Professor of Biology 

B.S. and M.S., McGill University; Ph.D., University of Permsylvania. 

Colin F. MacKay Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., University of Notre Dame; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

*On sabbatical leave, first semester, 1970-71. 
**On sabbatical leave, second semester, 1970-71. 
***On sabbatical leave, 1970-71. 
****On leave, second semester, 1970-71. 

14 



Sidney I. Perloe Professor of Psychology 

B.A., New York University; Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

Frank J. Quinn Professor of English 

B.A., M.A. and B.Litt., Oxford University. 

William H. Reese Professor of Music and Director of Glee Club 

A.B., Amherst College; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., University of 
Berlin. 

Edgar S. Rose Professor of English 

A.B., Franklin and Marshall College; A.M. and Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Melvin Santer Professor of Biology 

B.S., St. John's University; M.S., University of Massachusetts; Ph.D., George 
Washington University. 

Alfred W. Satterthwaite Professor of English 

A.B., A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Gerhard E. Spiegler Provost and Professor of Religion 

D.B., M.A. and Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

John P. Spielman, Jr Professor of History 

B.A., University of Montana; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Alfred Swan! Professor of Music 

B.A. and M.A., Oxford University. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Duncan Aswell Associate Professor of English 

A.B., Harvard College; M.A. and Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley. 

Thomas A. Benham Associate Professor of Engineering 

B.S. and M.S., Haverford College. 

Bradford Cook Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

B.A., Williams College; Ph.D., Yale University. 

Thomas J. D'Andrea Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A. and Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Robert M. Gavin, Jr Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., St. John's University; Ph.D., Iowa State University. 

Daniel J. Gillis Associate Professor of Classics 

B.A., Harvard College; M.A. and Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Dietrich Kessler Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A., Swarthmore College; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

L. Aryeh Kosman Associate Professor of Philosophy 

B.A. and M.A., University of California; Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Roger Lane Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Yale University; Ph.D., Harvard University. 

tOn appointment for the first semester, 1970-71. 

15 



Richard Luman Associate Professor of Religion 

A.B., A.M. and Ph.D., University of Iowa. 

Wyatt MacGaffey*'^* Associate Professor of Anthropology 

B.A. and M.A., Cambridge University; Ph.D., University of California, Los 
Angeles. 

John W. McKenna Scull Associate Professor of 

English Constitutional History 
B.A., Amherst College; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Cambridge 

University. 

Douglas G. Miller Associate Professor of Physics 

A.B., Yale University; Ph.D., University of Rochester. 

R. Bruce Partridge Associate Professor of Astronomy 

on the Sloan Foundation Grant 
B.A., Princeton University; D. Phil., Oxford University. 

Joseph Russo Associate Professor of Classics 

B.A., Brooklyn College; M.A. and Ph.D., Yale University. 

Charles Stegeman Associate Professor of Fine Arts 

Academic Royale des Beaux-Arts, Brussels. 

JosiAH D. Thompson, Jr Associate Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., M.A. and Ph.D., Yale University. 

Claude E. Wintner Associate Professor of Chemistry 

A.B., Princeton University; M.A. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Edward F. Bauer**** Assistant Professor of German 

B.A., St. John's College; M.A., Vanderbilt University; Ph.D., Princeton 
University. 

R. Christopher Cairns Assistant Professor of Fine Arts 

A.B., Oberlin; M.F.A., Tulane University. 

DisKiN Clay Assistant Professor of Classics 

B.A., Reed College; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Washington. 

Francis X. Connolly Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Fordham University; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Rochester. 

AsoKA Gangadean Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., City College of New York; Ph.D., Brandeis University. 

Linda G. Gerstein Assistant Professor of History 

B.A. and M.A., Radcliffe College; Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Jerry P. Gollub Assistant Professor of Physics 

A.B., Oberlin College; A.M., Harvard University. 

***On sabbatical leave, 1970-71. 
****0n leave of absence 1970-71. 

16 



Samuel Gubins Assistant Professor of Economics 

A.B., Reed College; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 

G. Eric Hansen Assistant Professor of Political Science 

A.B., Lawrence School; A.M., M.A.L.D. and Ph.D., The Fletcher School of 
Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University. 

Stephen S. Hecht Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Duke University; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

William F. Hohenstein Assistant Professor of Sociology 

A.B., Maryknoll Seminary; M.A., University of Pennsylvania. 

J. Bruce Long Assistant Professor of Religion 

B.A., Taylor University; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Richard J. Lubarsky Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Swarthmore College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania. 

Geoffrey Martin Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Yale University; Ph.D., Columbia University. 

Patrick McCarthy Assistant Professor of Romance Languages 

A.M., Harvard University; D. Phil., Oxford University. 

Robert A. Mortimer Assistant Professor of Political Science 

B.A., Wesleyan University; M.A. and Ph.D., Columbia University. 

Vivianne T. Nachmias Assistant Professor of Biology 

on the Sloan Foundation Grant 
B.A., Swarthmore College; M.A., Radcliffe College; M.D., University of 
Rochester. 

Joseph Neisendorfer Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

on the Sloan Foundation Grant 
B.S., University of Chicago; M.A., Princeton University. 

J. Kemp Randolph Assistant Professor of Physics 

on the Sloan Foundation Grant 
B.A., Williams College; Ph.D., Harvard University. 

James C. Ransom ='=** Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., University of New Mexico; M.A. and Ph.D., Yale University. 

Harry L. Rosenzweig Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; M.S., University of Arizona; 
Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Preston B. Rowe Assistant Professor of Psychology 

A.B., Dartmouth College; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Michael K. Showe Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.A., Haverford College; Ph.D., University of California, San Diego. 

Sara M. Shumer Assistant Professor of Political Science 

A.B., Barnard College; M.A., University of California, Berkeley. 

***0n sabbatical leave, 1970-71. 

17 



Craig Stark Assistant Professor of Religion 

A.B., Harvard College; A.M. and Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Robert E. Stiefel Assistant Professor of German 

A.B., Oberlin College; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Walter J. Trela Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S., Brown University; Ph.D., Stanford University. 

Sidney R. Waldman Assistant Professor of Political Science 

A.B., Oberlin College; Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

Andrzej Zabludowski Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

on the Sloan Foundation Grant 
M.A. and Ph.D., University of Warsaw. 

LECTURERS AND INSTRUCTORS 

Peter Atwood Instructor in Mathematics 

B.S., Trinity College. 

Laura BLANKERTzt Lecturer in Sociology 

A.B., Swarthmore College; M.A., Bryn Mawr College. 

Harold Boatrite Lecturer in Music 

D.Mus., Combs College of Music. 

David L. ELDERt Lecturer 

B.A. and M.A., Oberlin College. 

Jeffry GALPERtt Instructor 

B.A., Dartmouth College; M.S., Columbia University. 

Helen M. Hunter Visiting Lecturer in Economics 

B.A., Smith College; Ph.D., Radcliffe College. 

Tadeusz Krauze! Visiting Lecturer in Political Science 

M.A., University of Lodz. 

Samuel T. Lachs Lecturer in Religion 

on joint appointment with Bryn Mawr College 
B.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.H.L., The Jewish Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., Dropsie College. 

Murray S. LEviNtt Visiting Lecturer in Political Science 

B.A., Haverford College; M.A. and LL.B., Harvard University. 

Maria Marshall Lecturer in German 

Diplom-Psychologin, University of Munich. 

Zelbert MoOREtt Lecturer in Political Science 

B.A. and M.A., University of Oklahoma. 

Temple Painter Lecturer in Music 

B.Mus., Curtis Institute. 

tOn appointment for first semester, 1970-71. 
ttOn appointment for second semester, 1970-71. 

18 



Doris S. Quinn Lecturer in English 

B.A. and M.A., Oxford University. 

Frederick C. Schulze, jR.t Lecturer in Russian 

on joint appointment with Bryn Mawr College 
B.A., Haverford College; M.A., Columbia University. 

Paul E. Wehr Lecturer in Sociology 

B.A., University of Connecticut; M.A., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania. 

SPECIAL APPOINTMENTS 

John E. Butler Assistant in Biology 

Thomas Davis Assistant in the Science Division 

Francis De Pasquale Member of the Resident Chamber Music Group 

Cellist, Philadelphia Orchestra; Member, De Pasquale Quartet. 

Joseph De Pasquale Member of the Resident Chamber Music Group 

Diploma, Curtis Institute of Music; Violist, Philadelphia Orchestra; Member, 
De Pasquale Quartet. 

Robert De Pasquale Member of the Resident Chamber Music Group 

New School of Music; Violinist, Philadelphia Orchestra; Member, De Pasquale 
Quartet. 

William De Pasquale Member of the Resident Chamber Music Group 

Violinist, Philadelphia Orchestra; Member, De Pasquale Quartet; Concert 
Master, Philadelphia Orchestra for Robin Hood Dell Summer Concerts. 

Marthalyn Dickson Suburban Involvement Coordinator, 

Center for Nonviolent Conflict Resolution 
A.B., Asbury College; M.A., Cornell University. 

Sylvia Glickman . .Pianist in Residence of the Resident Chamber Music Group 
B.S. and M.Sc, Juilliard School of Music; L.R.A.M., Royal Academy of 
Music. 

Elizabeth U. Green Research Associate in Biology 

A.B., M.A. and Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College. 

Mary Hoxie Jones Research Associate in Quaker Studies 

A.B., Mount Holyoke College. 

Louise G. Onorato Laboratory Instructor in Biology 

B.S., Wilkes College; M.S., Temple University. 

Rudolph Tolbert Community Organization Coordinator, 

Center for Nonviolent Conflict Resolution 

James L. Vaughan Director of Counseling Services 

B.A., Earlham College; B.D., Yale Divinity School; M.S. Yale University. 

tOn appointment for first semester, 1970-71. 

19 



Jane Widseth Counselor 

B.A., University of Minnesota; M.A., Boston University. 

APPOINTMENTS UNDER SPECIAL GRANTS 

Catherine L. Busch Research Assistant in Physics 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania. 

Mabel M. Chen Research Associate in Astronomy 

B.S., The National Taiwan University; M.A. and Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College. 

Linda J. Dilworth Research Assistant in Biology 

Carol C. Heller Research Assistant in Biology 

B.A., Wilson College. 

Eleanor K. Kolchin Research Associate in Astronomy 

B.A., Brooklyn College. 

Cecily D. Littleton Research Associate in Astronomy 

B.A. and B.Sc, Oxford University. 

Patricia Marker Research Assistant in Biology 

Slavica S. Matacic Research Associate in Biology 

M.S. and Ph.D., University of Zagreb. 

Sara Shane Research Assistant in Biology 

B.A., Swarthmore College. 

Allen G. Shenstone Research Associate in Astronomy 

B.S., M.A. and Ph.D., Princeton University; B.A. and M.A., Cambridge 

University. 

Harriet Stone Research Assistant in Biology 

B.A., Antioch College. 

ADMINISTRATION 

John R. Coleman President 

B.A., University of Toronto; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Chicago; LL.D., 
Beaver College; LL.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

William W. Ambler Director of Admissions 

B.A., Haverford College. 

William F. Balthaser Director of Public Relations 

B.S., Temple University. 

Elmer J. Bogart Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

Temple University Technical Institute. 

William E. Cadbury, Jr. . . .Director of Post-Baccalaureate Fellowship Program 
B.S and M.A., Haverford College; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Stephen G. Cary Vice President for Development 

B.A., Haverford College; M.A., Columbia University. 

20 



George N. Couch Public Relations Associate 

B.A., Haverford College. 

Delores R. Davis Recorder 

Janet Henry Administrative Aide 

Gregory Kannerstein Assistant Dean of Students 

B.A., Haverford College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania. 

Albert J. Levine Associate Director of Development 

B.A., Hunter College. 

James W. Lyons Dean of Students 

B.A., Allegheny College; M.S. and Ed.D., Indiana University. 

Zelbert L. Moore Assistant to the President 

B.A. and M.A., University of Oklahoma. 

Charles Perry Secretary to the Administration 

B.A., Haverford College; M.S.S., Bryn Mawr College. 

David Potter Associate Dean of the College 

B.A., Haverford College; Ed.M., Temple University. 

William A. Shafer, Jr Assistant Director of Admissions 

B.A., Haverford College. 

William E. Sheppard, II Director of Alumni Affairs 

B.S., Haverford College. 

Charles W. Smith Vice President for Business Affairs 

F.C.A., Institute of Chartered Accountants; A.C.I.S., Chartered Institute of 
Secretaries; CPA. 

Gerhard E. Spiegler Provost and Dean of the Faculty 

D.B., M.A. and Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Dana W. Swan, II Director of Athletics 

B.A., Swarthmore College. 

Stephen P. Theophilos Assistant Business Manager 

B.A. and B.D., Hellenic College; M.S., Boston University. 

Paul E. Wehr Director of the Center for Research on 

Nonviolent Conflict Resolution 
B.A., University of Connecticut; M.A., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania. 

John A. Williams Assistant Director of Admissions 

B.A., Haverford College. 

MEDICAL STAFF 

William W. Lander Physician 

B.S., Ursinus College; M.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Peter G. Bennett Psychiatrist 

B.A., Haverford College; M.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

21 



Louise Anastasi Head Nurse 

R.N., Philadelphia General Hospital; B.S.N., Hunter College. 

LIBRARY STAFF 

Edwin B. Bronner Librarian; Curator of the Quaker Collection 

B.A., Whittier College; M.A., Haverford College; Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania. 

Barbara L. Curtis Cataloger, Quaker Collection 

B.A., Bryn Mawr College; M.A.T., Radcliffe College; M.S. (L.S.), Drexel 

University. 

David A. Fraser Associate Librarian, Administration 

B.A., Hamilton College; M.A. and M.S. (L.S.), Syracuse University. 

Else Goldberger Acquisitions Librarian 

Ph.D., University of Vienna. 

M. Constance Hyslop Circulation and Government Documents Librarian 

B.A., Mount Holyoke College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.S. 
(L.S.), Drexel University. 

B JORG MiEHLE Reference Librarian 

University of Oslo; Graduate, Norwegian State Library School; B.S. (L.S.), 
Drexel University. 

Rhona Ovedoff Catalog Librarian 

B.A. and Dip. Lib., University of the Witwatersrand. 

Esther R. Ralph Assistant Librarian, Reader Services 

B.S., West Chester State College; B.S. (L.S.), Drexel University. 

Ruth H. Reese Associate Librarian, Technical Services 

B.A., Acadia University; B.S. (L.S.), Simmons College. 

Sylvia Schnaars Serials Librarian 

B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University; M.S. (L.S.), Villanova University. 

Herbert C. Standing Catalog Librarian 

B.A., William Penn College; M.A., Haverford College; B.D., Drake Uni- 
versity; M.S. (L.S.), Drexel University. 

Shirley Stowe Social Sciences Bibliographer 

B.A., Radcliffe College; M.S. (L.S.), Drexel University. 

THE JOINT COMPUTING CENTER OF BRYN MAWR, 
HAVERFORD, SWARTHMORE 

Charles J. Springer Acting Director 

B.S., Union College. 

David S. Bailey Systems Analyst 

B.S., University of California, Los Angeles; M.A., University of Southern 
California; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley. 

Hazel C. Pugh Operator 

22 



COLLEGE VISITORS ON SPECIAL FUNDS 1969-70 



WILLIAM PYLE PHILIPS FUND 

Joseph Agassi 

Professor of Philosophy of Science 

Boston University 
Abram Amsel 

Professor of Psychology 

University of Texas 
JusTirj Aronfreed 

Professor of Psychology 

University of Pennsylvania 
Shlomo Avineri 

Chairman, Department of 
Political Science 

Hebrew University, Jerusalem 
Eduardo Baranano 

Consultant in Architecture, Planning 
and Development 

Hillsborough, California 
Michael G. Barratt 

Professor of Mathematics 

University of Manchester 

Seymour Benzer 
Professor of Biology 
California Institute of Technology 

Daniel Biebuyck 

Chairman, Department of 

Anthropology 
University of Delaware 

Daniel Branton 

Assistant Professor of Botany 
University of California, Berkeley 

William P. Brown 

School of Criminal Justice 

SUNY, Albany, N. Y. 

Thomas C. Bruice 
Professor of Chemistry 
University of California, 
Santa Barbara 
Richard W. Buford 

Former Executive Director of the 
New York City Planning 
Commission 

Eveline Burns 

Department of Political Science 
New York University 



Joseph Califano, Jr. 

Former top domestic assistant to 
President Johnson, 
Washington, D. C. 

E. J. Capaldi 
Professor of Psychology 
Purdue University 

Pierre Cartier 

Department of Mathematics 
University of Strasbourg 

Amiya Chakravarty 

Professor of Philosophy, SUNY, 
New Paltz, Former associate of 
Tagore and Gandhi 

Charles Chatfield 
Department of History 
Wittenberg University 

Pierre Conner 

Professor of Mathematics 
University of Virginia 

Philip Converse 

Professor of Political Science 
University of Michigan 

John Darley, Jr. 

Associate Professor of Psychology 
Princeton University 

Pierre Deligne 

Department of Mathematics 
Institut des Hautes fitudes 

Scientifiques and Harvard 

University 

Shri Narayan Desai 
Secretary, Shanti Sena 

(Indian Peace Brigade) 
Rajghat, Varanasi, India 

J. L. DiLLARD 

Professor of Linguistics 
Ferkauf Graduate School of 

Humanities and Social Sciences, 
Yeshiva University 

Jerry Donohue 

Professor of Chemistry 
University of Pennsylvania 



23 



WILLIAM PYLE PHILIPS FUND, Cont. 



Manfred Eigen 

Max Planck Institut fiir 
Physikalische Chemie 

Gottingen, Germany 
Cyprian Ekwensi 

West African Novelist 

Ministry of Information, Biafra 
James Fernandez 

Associate Professor of Anthropology 

Dartmouth College 
Sidney Fleischer 

Associate Professor of Biology 

Vanderbilt University 
Roger Godement 

Professor of Mathematics 

University of Paris and Institute 
for Advanced Study, Princeton 
Richard C. Gonzalez 

Chairman, Department of 

Psychology, Bryn Mawr College 
John B. Gurdon 

Lecturer in Biology 

Oxford University 

F. E. P. HiRZEBRUCH 

Professor of Mathematics 
University of Bonn and Institute for 
Advanced Study, Princeton 

Dell H. Hymes 

Professor of Anthropology 
University of Pennsylvania 

Aaron J. Ihde 

Professor of Chemistry and 

History of Science 
University of Wisconsin 

Philemona Indire 

Senior Lecturer in Education 
University College, Nairobi 
Former Undersecretary of Foreign 
Affairs, Kenya 

RoBioN Kirby 

Professor of Mathematics 
University of California, Los 
Angeles, and Institute for 
Advanced Study, Princeton 

Lawrence Kohlberg 

Professor of Education and Social 
Psychology, Harvard University 



Alan D. Krisch 

Professor of Physics 

University of Michigan 
N. KUIPER 

Professor of Mathematics 

University of Amsterdam and 
Institute for Advanced Study, 
Princeton 
William Labov 

Professor of Linguistics 

Columbia University 
K. Gordon Lark 

Professor of Biophysics 

Kansas State University 
Richard Lashov 

Professor of Mathematics 

University of Chicago 
Nehemia Levzion 

Coordinator of African Studies 

Institute of Asian and African 
Studies, Hebrew University, 
Jerusalem 
Carelton Mabee 

Division of History and 
Political Economy 

SUNY, New Paltz 
Milton Mayer 

Author, Professor of English 

University of Massachusetts 
Clifford Matthews 

Professor of Chemistry 

University of Illinois, Chicago 
Ian L. McHarg 

Professor of Landscape Architecture 
and Regional Planning 

University of Pennsylvania 
William Mitchell 

Professor of Political Science 

University of Oregon 
Harold J. Morowitz 

Associate Professor of Biophysics 

Yale University 
Lois B. Murphy 

Senior Psychologist 

Menninger Foundation 
C. V. Narasimhan 

Chief of Cabinet 

United Nations 



24 



WILLIAM PYLE PHILIPS FUND, Cont. 



Jason Nathan 

Former Director of Housing and 
Redevelopment, New York City 
James G. O'Hara 

U.S. House of Representatives 

Washington, D. C. 
Earl Old Person 

President, National Congress of 
American Indians; Chairman, 
Blackfeet Tribe 

Browning, Montana 
James Olds 

Professor of Psychology 

California Institute of Technology 
George E. Palade 

Professor of Cell Biology 

Rockefeller University 
P. J. E. Peebles 

Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

Princeton University 
TULLIO Regge 

Permanent Member, Institute for 
Advanced Study, Princeton 
T. Y. Rogers, Jr. 

Director of Affiliates 

Southern Christian Leadership 
Conference 
John Robert Ross 

Professor of Linguistics 

Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology 
Bayard Rustin 

Director, A. Philip Randolph 
Institute, New York 
Arthur Schawlow 

Chairman, Department of Physics 

Stanford University 
Jean-Pierre Serre 

Professor of Mathematics 

College de France, Paris 

Gene Sharp 

Center for International Affairs 
Harvard University 

Lavv^rence Siebenman 
Professor of Mathematics 
Institute for Advanced Study 
Princeton 



Elliott Skinner 

Professor of Anthropology 
Columbia University 
Former U.S. Ambassador to the 
Republic of Upper Volta 

Roman Smoluchowski 

Professor in the Solid State Group 

Department of Aerospace 

Engineering 
Princeton University 

Larry Stein 

Department of Psychopharmacology 
Wyeth Laboratories 

Gilbert Steiner 
Brookings Institution 
Washington, D. C. 

Fritz Stern 

Seth Low Professor of History 
Columbia University 

Courtney E. Stevens 

Fellow and Tutor, Magdalen College 
Oxford University 

William A. Stewart 

Director, Education Study Center 
Washington, D. C. 

Dennis Sullivan 

Professor of Mathematics 
Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology 

Kip Thorne 

Professor of Astronomy 
California Institute of Technology 

Jui H. Wang 

Eugene Higgins Professor of 

Physical Chemistry 
Yale University 

Joseph Weber 

Professor of Physics 
University of Maryland 

Arthur Wightman 

Professor of Mathematics and 
Physics, Princeton University 

Harris Wofford 
President-elect 
Bryn Mawr College 



25 



SCHOLARS IN THE HUMANITIES FUND 



James Boeringer 

Professor of Music 

Susquehanna University 
William S. A. Dale 

Chairman, Department of Fine Arts 

University of Western Ontario 
Gerald F. Else 

Professor of Classical Studies 

University of Michigan 
Eric Havelock 

Professor of Classics 

Yale University 
William H. Poteat 

Professor of Religion and Culture 

Duke University 



Richard H. Robinson 

Professor of Indian Studies 
University of Michigan 

Walter Sokel 

Professor of German 
Stanford University 

Robert Suderburg 
Professor of Music 
University of Wisconsin 

J. A. B. van Buitenen 
Professor of Sanskrit 
University of Chicago 

Jerome H. Wood, Jr. 

Assistant Professor of History 
Temple University 



WILLIAM GIBBONS RHOADS FUND 

Alfred Mann 

Professor of Music, Rutgers 
University, Conductor, Bach 
Choir of Bethlehem, Pa. 
Barbara De Pasquale 

Violinist, Philadelphia Orchestra 
Frederick Rzewski and His Group 
"Musica Elettronica Viva" 
Rome, Italy 



Donald Swann 
Composer 
London, England 

Stan Van Der Beek 
Film maker 
Artist in Residence 
Massachusetts Institute 
Technology 



of 



LINCOLN FAMILY FOUNDATION FUND FOR THE HUMANITIES 



Giles Constable 

Henry Charles Lea Professor of 
Medieval History 

Harvard University 
William Theodore Debary 

Chairman, Department of 
Oriental Thought 

Columbia University 
Donald Keene 

Professor of Japanese Literature 

Columbia University 



New York Trio da Camera 
New York 

Nathan Rotenstreich 

Former Chairman, Department of 
Philosophy, and former Rector 
Hebrew University, Jerusalem 

J. B. Trapp 

Warburg Institute 
London 



THOMAS SHIPLEY FUND 

Ralph Ellison 
Author 
New York 



MARY FARNUM BROWN FUND 

Daniel Day Williams 

Union Theological Seminary 
New York 



26 



ACADEMIC COUNCIL 

The Academic Council consists of the President as chairman; the 
Provost; the Associate Dean as executive secretary; three elected divi- 
sional representatives of the faculty, one to be elected yearly; and the 
two faculty representatives to the Board. The Academic Council: 
1) appoints the standing faculty committees, 2) makes recommendations 
to the President on faculty appointments, reappointments, promotions, 
and tenure in accordance with accepted procedures, and 3) may con- 
sider matters having college-wide academic implications which are re- 
ferred to it by the President and/or by members of the Council. The 
elected members of the Academic Council for the academic year begin- 
ning September 1, 1970 are Mr. Glickman (Social Sciences), Mr. Santer 
(Natural Sciences), and Mr. Kosman (Humanities). 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

(The President and Provost are ex-officio members of all committees) 

Administrative Advisory: Marcel Gutwirth, Chairman 

Samuel Gubins, Sidney Perloe, Michael Showe, Robert Stiefel 

Community Concerns: Holland Hunter, Chairman 

Preston Rowe, Francis Connolly, William Docherty, 
Theodore Hetzel, Sara Shumer 

Student Standing and Programs: John Spielman, Chairman 
Patrick McCarthy, David Potter, Walter Trela 

Computing Center: Robert Gavin, Chairman 
Louis Green, Eric Hansen 

Distinguished Visitors: Richard Luman, Chairman 
Charles Stegeman, Claude Wintner 

Educational Environment: Josiah Thompson, Chairman 

Thomas Benham, Robert Butman, Bruce Long, William Reese 

Educational Policy: Colin MacKay, Chairman 

Edwin Bronner, John Davison, Dale Husemoller, 
William Hohenstein, Roger Lane, David Potter 

Faculty Research and Study: Douglas Heath, Chairman 
John McKenna, Douglas Miller 

Inter-College Cooperation: Linda Gerstein, Chairman 
Richard Bernstein, John Cary, Louis Green 

27 



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THE 

COLLEGE 

AIMD ITS 

PROGRAM 




PURPOSE 

Haverford College is dedicated to academic excellence — created in 
an environment of concern for the growth of individuals within the 
College community. 

The College places strong emphasis upon a rigorous academic pro- 
gram. That program is flexible in form and content to meet the needs of 
individual students, but this flexibility assumes that the men of ability 
who come here will use their ability to the highest degree. 

Our faculty is noted above all for its strength in teaching. These men 
and women are scholars who love their work and expect to transmit to 
students their enthusiasm and high standards in their respective fields. 
They are teaching at a small liberal arts college as an opportunity for 
creative interchange with individual students. They expect much from 
themselves and their students; they expect to learn as well as to teach 
in this close relationship with undergraduates. 

We aim to utilize the full resources of the College, in and out of the 
classroom, to promote the personal and intellectual growth of our 
students. Through an ambitious program of visiting lecturers, through 
arts and cultural activities, through self-government and service pro- 
grams, through a student-centered athletic program, and through day- 
to-day living on campus, we stress each man's development. We ask 
our students to give of themselves, even as they draw new strengths 
from others. The classroom and the extra-curricular world are, for us, 
inseparable parts of the educational environment. And we seek excel- 
lence throughout that entire environment. 

We strive to create an atmosphere in which personal and intellectual 
integrity, honesty, and concern for others are dominant forces. We 
expect every student who studies with us to adhere to the Honor Code 
as it is adopted each year by the Students' Association. That code is a 
way of life at Haverford. The Coflege does not have as many formal 
rules as most other colleges; what it has instead is something more 
demanding — a set of expectations about how men will govern their 
affairs and conduct themselves so as to show respect and concern for 
others around them. We welcome students' participation in making the 
College still better in the future. We expect our students to contribute 
responsibly and considerately, individually and collectively, in the task 
of fashioning new programs that let us achieve our core aims of 
academic excellence in a humane and stimulating atmosphere. 

Haverford College has strong Quaker roots. The continuing influence 
of the Religious Society of Friends shows most clearly in our emphasis 

30 



on the interplay of the individual and the community, our concern for 
the uses to which men put their expanding knowledge, and our interest 
in educating ethical human beings and leaders. No religious activities 
are compulsory, and admission is open to men of all faiths. A weekly 
meeting on Thursday mornings (Fifth Day) is a visible sign of our 
communal searching, through both silence and the spoken word, for 
the principles by which able men can lead moral lives. 

HISTORY 

Founded in 1833, Haverford was the first college established in the 
United States by members of the Society of Friends. Our founders said 
they wanted to provide an "enlarged and liberal system of instruction" 
to meet the intellectual needs of "Friends on this continent." They pre- 
dicted that their course of instruction in science, mathematics and 
classical languages would be "as extensive as given in any literary 
institution in this country." 

And so it has been. 

They built their new school (one solid, stone structure at first) in the 
center of the rolling farmland west of Philadelphia — in the Welsh 
Tract, a large area originally set aside by William Penn for Quaker 
immigrants from Wales. A British gardener was brought over to land- 
scape the grounds. His work remains today on Haverford's beautiful 
216-acre campus. At first the new institution, called Haverford School, 
was open only to Quakers. In 1847 non-Quakers were admitted. In 
1856 the school became Haverford College — a degree-granting 
institution. 

LOCATION 

Geographically, we're right where our founders put us. But the 
area has changed considerably since 1833. Today, Haverford is in 
the heart of Philadelphia's verdant Main Line suburbs, just 10 miles 
west of the city. Center-city, with its urban advantages and challenges, 
is only 20 minutes away. The area offers extensive cultural, scientific, 
commercial, and industrial facilities. Within a half-hour drive from our 
campus there are some 20 other colleges and universities. Transporta- 
tion is good. The Penn-Central Railroad's Haverford station is a brief 
walk from our campus. For auto traffic, we front on U. S. Route 30, 
Lancaster Pike, just a few miles south of the Pennsylvania Turnpike. 
By train, we're two hours from New York City and three hours from 

31 



Washington. Philadelphia International Airport is a half-hour express- 
way drive. 

Yet the campus remains the park-like, peaceful, natural setting that 
the first students found in 1833. The years have only matured the 
plantings and increased the beauty. We have improved things here and 
there. Our Edward Woolman Arboretum and Nature Walk, combining 
beauty and botany, for example, was created by an alumnus of the 
class of 1893 who initiated the project with a generous donation, spent 
some 15 of his last years working on the walk — often with his own 
hands — and then left a bequest to finish the job. 

RESOURCES 

LIBRARY: The library was planned and developed to provide intellectual 
resources needed to sustain our academic curriculum. Over the years, 
the faculty has selected the majority of the volumes. Most books are on 
open shelves accessible to students for almost 100 hours each week 
during the college year. 

Through special collections we provide opportunities for independent 
research in several fields, notably Quaker history. Independent study in 
the social sciences is aided by our Government Depository and Inter- 
national Documents Collections. And there are other collections of 
manuscripts, orientalia and Renaissance literature. These special collec- 
tions are described later in this section. 

The library currently holds about 280,000 volumes and receives some 
1,800 periodicals and serials. It is an academic library, planned and 
operated for our students and faculty; but alumni and members of the 
Library Associates also are welcome guests. 

The library building was constructed in several stages. The first 
portion of the Thomas Wistar Brown Library was built in 1864. 
Successive additions were made; and in 1968 we constructed the large, 
connected James P. Magill Library, named for a member of the class 
of 1907. As part of the Magill Library project, the older adjoining 
structure was thoroughly renovated and air-conditioned. 

The library now has about 73,000 sq. ft. of floor space, six levels, 
shelf space for 500,000 volumes, seating capacity for 500 persons, and 
a fire-proof vault, with controlled temperature and humidity, for rare 
books and manuscripts. There are 260 study carrels. Thirty are enclosed 
and reserved for faculty, and the rest are for students. Of those, 24 are 
soundproof for students who want to use typewriters in the library. 
Special reading and work areas include the following: 

32 



The Borton Wing, named for Hugh Borton, class of 1926, former 
president of Haverford College, contains the Harvey Peace Research 

Room and the vault for rare books and manuscripts. 

The Crawford Mezzanine provides writing and study tables for 44 
students. It honors Alfred R. Crawford, class of 1931, former vice 
president of the college. 

The Giimmere-Morley Room, a browsing room, is in memory of 
Professors F. B. Gummere, class of 1872, and Frank Morley, Sr. 

The Hires Room, named for Harrison Hires, class of 1910, and 
Mrs. Hires, is an audio room offering both discs and tapes. 

The Rufus M. Jones Study, a reconstruction of a room in Rufus 
Jones's home, contains his books and furniture. Jones, a noted Quaker 
philosopher, Haverford alumnus and teacher (class of 1885), spent 
almost 50 years on our campus. 

The Microforms Room is equipped with microfilm, microfiche, and 
microcard readers plus microfilm files of The New York Times, the 
Philadelphia Public Ledger and Landmarks of Science. 

The Christopher Morley Alcove serves as a browsing area and 
contains exhibits and collections of the writings of Christopher Morley, 
a member of the class of 1910. 

The C. Christopher Morris Cricket Library and Collection is a 

handsome room housing material on the history of American cricket, 
with special emphasis on the sport at Haverford College and in the 
Philadelphia area. 

The Philips Wing was renovated in 1952 and named in honor of 
one of our principal benefactors, William Pyle Philips, class of 1902. 
Plans call for use of this wing as a special reading room for semi-rare 
books and periodicals. 

The Sharpless Gallery was named in honor of Isaac Sharpless, 
president of Haverford from 1887 to 1917, and furnished by the class 
of 1917. A selection of the college's paintings hangs there. 

The Strawbridge Seminar Room is used for seminars and com- 
mittee meetings. 

The Treasure Room, provided through the generosity of Morris E. 
Leeds, class of 1888 and a former chairman of the board of managers, 
contains part of the Quaker Collection. Staff offices and research 

33 



facilities for visiting scholars are provided in the Treasure Room and 
Borton Wing. 

Special libraries are maintained in Stokes Hall for chemistry, physics, 
and mathematics; in Sharpless Hall for biology; in the Drinker Music 
Center for music; and in Hilles Laboratory for engineering. 

We have nine major special collections: The Quaker Collection, the 
Tobias Collection of the Writings of Rufus M. Jones, the Rufus M. 
Jones Collection on Mysticism, the Charles Roberts Autograph Letter 
Collection, the French Drama of the Romantic Period Collection, the 
Christopher Morley Collection of Autographed Letters, the William 
Pyle Philips Collection, the Harris Collection of Ancient and Oriental 
Manuscripts, and the Lockwood Collection of Works on the Renaissance. 

The Quaker Collection began in 1867 when the board of managers 
decided to gather "an important reference library, especially for works 
and manuscripts relating to our own Religious Society." At that time, 
the library already contained many Quaker books and manuscripts, 
including the "Letters and Papers of William Penn." 

Today, The Quaker Collection is a major repository for both printed 
and manuscript material about the Society of Friends. Its 25,000 books 
include more than 4,000 volumes printed before 1700. The nucleus of 
these early works is the William H. Jenks Collection of Friends Tracts, 
containing 1 ,600 separately bound titles, mostly from the 1 7th century. 

There are several thousand pamphlets and serials in our nearly com- 
plete set of bound volumes of Quaker periodicals. In addition, we have 
a magnificent collection of Yearly Meeting minutes. The Quaker Col- 
lection's 86,000 manuscripts, documents, maps and pictures include the 
journals of about 700 important Friends, the papers of leading Quaker 
families. Meeting records, archives of Quaker organizations, and 
material on Friends' relationships with Indians. 

Through gifts and purchases, we add to The Quaker Collection 
constantly. We especially welcome gifts of family papers, books and 
other material related to the history of Friends. On request, the librarian 
will send a brochure giving more information on The Quaker Collection. 

The Rufus M. Jones Collection contains 1,360 books and pam- 
phlets on mysticism published between the 15th century and the present. 

The Tobias Collection includes practically the complete writings of 
Quaker philosopher Rufus Jones. There are 325 separate volumes and 
eight boxes of pamphlets and extracts. Jones' personal papers, also kept 
at Haverford, generally are available to scholars. 

34 



The Roberts Collection contains more than 20,000 manuscript 
items such as a complete set of the signers of the Declaration of 
Independence and letters of famous authors, statesmen, educators, 
artists, scientists, ecclesiastics and monarchs. It also includes valuable 
papers on religious, political and military history. 

The French Drama Collection was given to the College by William 
Maul Measey. It consists of several hundred popular plays produced in 
Paris between 1790 and 1850. 

The Morley Collection comprises about 1,000 letters and memo- 
randa selected by the late author, Christopher Morley, from his cor- 
respondence files. There are autographed letters from more than 100 
contemporary authors. Morley was born on our campus. 

The Philips Collection primarily consists of rare books and manu- 
scripts, mostly of the Renaissance period. Among the Philips treasures 
are first editions of Dante, Copernicus, Spenser, the King James Bible, 
Milton, Newton and the four folios of Shakespeare. 

The Harris Collection has more than 60 Hebrew, Latin, Arabic, 
Syriac and Ethiopian rolls and codices collected by J. Rendel Harris. 

The Lockwood Collection consists of some 3,000 volumes of works 
on the Renaissance gathered and given to us by Dean P. Lockwood, 
librarian from 1920 to 1949. 

The offerings of our library are widened by affiliations. For example, 
we maintain a cooperative arrangement with nearby Bryn Mawr and 
Swarthmore colleges. The library facilities of each college are open to 
faculty and students of all three schools. The Philadelphia Bibliograph- 
ical Center and Union Library Catalogue — the largest regional cooper- 
ative catalog in America — enables users of our library to locate 
books in more than 200 Philadelphia-area libraries. 

ACADEMIC BUILDINGS: The one sohd, stone structure we started with in 
1833 cost $19,251.40. It's still here. Now it is called Founders Hall, but 
for years it was just known as "The College." Today, it houses mostly 
administration and faculty offices. Since Founders Hall went up, more 
than 20 major buildings and over 35 lesser structures have been con- 
structed on campus. Most are shown on the campus map at the rear of 
this catalog. Many are the homes of faculty members, most of whom 
live on or near the campus. 

The major classroom and laboratory buildings are Chase Hall, the 

35 



Hilles Laboratory of Applied Sciences, the Strawbridge Memorial 
Observatory, the Henry S. Drinker Music Center, Stokes Hall, Sharpless 
Hall, the Lyman Beecher Hall Building and Yarnall House. 

Hilles houses the computing center and the business office. 

Stokes is the home of the physics, chemistry, and mathematics 
departments. It has classrooms, laboratories, offices, a 205-seat audi- 
torium, and our science library with space for 20,000 volumes. 

Sharpless contains the biology and psychology departments — mainly 
classrooms, offices and laboratories. 

Hall Building contains an African-studies room as well as a perma- 
nent display of primitive art. It also houses classrooms and offices. 

Drinker houses the music department, record collection, music 
library, practice facilities, classrooms, and offices. 

Yarnall House is the temporary quarters of our Center for Non- 
violent Resolution of Conflict. 

SCIENCE FACILITIES: We are equipped for teaching and research in 
modern nuclear and atomic physics. There are six general physics 
laboratories for course work, seven specialized laboratories for student- 
faculty research, and two rooms used exclusively by seniors for their 
major projects. Our physics equipment includes: an X-ray unit for 
powder diffraction work, a subcritical reactor containing 2.5 tons of 
uranium, a doubly shielded room for work with electromagnetic radia- 
tion, lasers, multi-channel pulse-height analyzers, a PDP-9 computer, 
and equipment for the study of low -temperature phenomena down to 
1°K. 

Our chemistry facilities enable students to use sophisticated instru- 
mentation extensively at all levels of study. There are five laboratories 
for course work, an instrument room, specialized-equipment rooms, and 
six laboratories in which students conduct research projects jointly with 
the faculty. Chemistry equipment available for routine use by students 
includes: a Varian A 60 nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer; a 
C. E. C. 21-620 mass spectrometer; a Packard Tri-Carb liquid scin- 
tillation spectrometer for use in radioactive tracer studies; a Hitachi- 
Perkin-Elmer visible and ultra-violet scanning spectrophotometer; 
two F. & M. research gas chromatographs, one of which has a flame 
ionization detector, and a Wang 700 B programmable electronic cal- 
culator. The X-ray laboratory is outfitted with a Picker multifocus 

36 



X-ray generator, an Enraf-Nonius integrating precession camera, and 
associated apparatus which students can use in their projects to deter- 
mine molecular structures. In addition to these major items, there are 
simpler spectrophotometers and simpler apparatus for work with radio- 
active tracers. The physical-chemistry laboratory equipment includes a 
Bausch and Lomb grating spectrograph, six high-vacuum systems, bomb 
and microcalorimeters, and a variety of high precision electrical and 
electronic apparatus. Mettler single-pan balances and ground-joint 
glassware are used in all instructional laboratories. We have a glass- 
blowing shop and a science-division machine shop. 

Grants from the National Science Foundation may be available to 
our chemistry students who wish to participate in summer research 
projects at Haverford. 

Haverford is well equipped for the study of modern molecular 
biology. In Sharpless Hall, two of the floors devoted to biology house 
a large freshman-sophomore laboratory and a junior laboratory equipped 
to handle all aspects of cell biology. One of these floors also has animal 
rooms and shops for glass-blowing, woodworking and metalworking. 
The third biology floor is where senior students work with their profes- 
sors on joint research projects. That floor has several constant-temper- 
ature rooms, ultracentrifuges, a high-resolution electron miscroscope, 
spectrophotometers, liquid scintillation counters, and an automatic 
amino-acid analyzer. 

Psychology has the top two floors of Sharpless Hall, containing 
animal quarters, an animal laboratory with sound-proofed and elec- 
tronically controlled experimental rooms, a set of individual animal- and 
human-research rooms, a perception laboratory, a social-personality 
observation laboratory with one-way mirrors, and a shop. All the labo- 
ratory rooms are wired to a central control panel, permitting us to 
create complex communication and control patterns. We also have a 
physiological-psychology room for animal work. 

The Observatory contains: a 10-inch, f/15 refractor; several smaller 
telescopes; a meridian circle; a zenith telescope; a spectrohelioscope; an 
astrographic mounting with two 4-inch f/7 cameras, one corrected for 
blue wave lengths, the other corrected for red; and a 4-inch guide 
telescope; a Grant comparator with x- and y- traverse and automatic 
position and density recording; various smaller instruments and our 
astronomical library of some 3,000 bound volumes. 

COMPUTING CENTER: With Bryn Mawr and Swarthmore colleges, we 
maintain on campus an $800,000 computing center used mainly for 

37 



student instruction and for faculty and student research. Smaller com- 
puters on the three affiliated campuses handle simple local tasks, while 
referring more ambitious computing projects to the main equipment at 
Haverford. 

The main unit, an IBM System/360 Model 44, has two memory 
units: a high-speed unit with a memory of 32,768 words and a reading 
speed of one million words per second, and a slow-speed unit with a 
memory of almost five million words and a reading speed of 39,000 
words per second. Our second, smaller computer is a PDP-8/I unit 
manufactured by the Digital Equipment Corporation. This unit links 
the equipment at the other two colleges to our main computer. The 
PDP-8/I is connected by remote terminals to laboratories, offices and 
classrooms on our campus and to other schools in the area. We also 
have several key punches, a sorter, a reproducer, a tabulator and other 
equipment. 

All computing equipment may be used by students. In addition to 
the usual scientific applications, our computing center also is used for 
work in the social sciences, the arts and humanities. A committee, with 
faculty and student members from all three campuses, supervises the 
computing center. Students serve on the center's operating staff. 

RESIDENCE HALLS: As an integral part of our educational philosophy, 
we encourage students to become as involved as possible in our com- 
munity life. Normally we expect students to live on campus — except 
for married students and those living at home. Freshmen are assigned 
the rooms available after the other classes have made their choices; 
new students are notified of their housing assignments before they arrive 
on campus in September. 

We expect students to treat college property with care; we hold a 
student financially responsible for any damage to his room. 

About 95 per cent of the students live on campus — mostly in suites 
with two, three, four or six private bed-study rooms adjoining a common 
living room. Barclay Hall houses 100 men in two-man suites, single 
rooms and double rooms. Lloyd Hall has mostly six-man suites, 
although there are a few two-man suites; total occupancy is 108 men. 
Leeds Hall, with 52 men, has both four-man suites and single rooms. 
Gummere Hall has two-, three-, and four-man suites plus some single 
rooms — 1 29 places altogether. Jones and Comfort Halls each house 
61 students in three- and four-man suites plus some single rooms; each 
hall has a suite for visiting scholars. Lunt Hall, with three- and four- 

38 



man suites and single rooms, holds 63 students. Williams House, for 
Spanish-speaking students, accommodates seven men. French House 
contains a faculty apartment and student quarters for 13 men; and 15 
men are quartered in "710" House. 

With the exception of Barclay, all residence halls are either fairly 
new or completely renovated. Renovation of Barclay is scheduled for 
completion in 1971. 

OTHER BUILDINGS: The offices of the president, provost and admissions 
director are in Roberts Hall, a columned building that also contains a 
700-seat auditorium. The dean of students, associate dean of the 
college, recorder, development office, alumni office and public relations 
office are in Founders Hall. The business office is in Hilles; and the 
Union building houses the bookstore, snack bar, student lounges, and 
the college radio station WHRC. 

The ten-bed Morris Infirmary contains a clinic, an emergency treat- 
ment room, an acute-care unit, and an isolation unit for contagious 
diseases. It has its own kitchen and quarters for resident nurses. 

We opened a new dining center in 1969. 



ART COLLECTION: Haverford's small permanent art collection includes 
paintings and drawings by Homer, Kurd, Inness, Peale, Sargent and 
Whistler. From time to time, there are also temporary exhibitions of 
paintings, drawings and photographs on campus. At the beginning of 
each semester, we lend students framed reproductions of outstanding 
works of art to hang in their rooms. We also lend a few originals. 

MUSIC: The music library contains a large collection of music scores, 
including the complete works of several composers. Our record collec- 
tion, started with a Carnegie Corporation gift, is used for teaching and 
study. There are nine practice pianos and an electric practice organ on 
campus. In Roberts Hall, where larger concerts are held, there are a 
Steinway grand piano and a Schlicker pipe organ. Professional concerts 
add much to the college year. 



ATHLETIC FACILITIES: The gymnasium, the Alumni Field House and 

our other athletic facilities are described later in the section on physical 
education. 

39 



ADMISSION 

The policy of Haverford College is to admit to the freshman class 
those applicants who, in the opinion of the College, are best qualified to 
profit by the opportunities which Haverford offers and at the same time 
to contribute to undergraduate life. Due regard is given not only to 
scholarly attainment, as shown by school record and examination, but 
also to character and personality, plus interest and ability in extracur- 
ricular activities. Applicants compete for admission to a carefully se- 
lected and comparatively small student body — no more than 700 men. 

A candidate's preparatory course should include a minimum of: four 
years of English; three years of mathematics, including two years of 
algebra; three years of one foreign language, in preference to two years 
in each of two languages; a laboratory science; and a year in history or 
social studies. The candidate's personal interests dictate what additional 
secondary-school courses he takes in foreign language, mathematics, 
science, social studies and history. Most candidates will have taken 
honors, enriched or advanced-placement courses if offered in their 
school. 

Each applicant must take the Scholastic Aptitude Test and three 
achievement tests of the College Entrance Examination Board before 
February of his senior year. The English Composition Test is required 
as one of those three achievement tests; but the candidate may choose 
any other two tests he wants. 

The applicant is responsible for completing all arrangements to take 
the tests and to have the scores reported directly to Haverford. Infor- 
mation about them may be obtained from his school guidance officer or 
from the College Entrance Examination Board, Box 592, Princeton, 
N.J. 08540. 

A candidate for freshman admission should apply early in the senior 
year. His application should be accompanied by a check or money 
order for $15, drawn to the order of Haverford College. This applica- 
tion fee is not refundable. The deadline for receipt of freshman applica- 
tions is January 31; all supporting credentials must be received by 
February 15. We begin reviewing applications in January, and complete 
our decisions in early April. Applicants will be notified by mid-April. 

We hope the candidate will visit the campus because a visit is the 
best way he can learn about Haverford. Student-guided tours of the 
campus and interviews with a member of the admissions staff should 
be scheduled in advance with the admissions office. The telephone 



40 



I 



number is (215) 649-9600, ext. 223; the mailing address is Haverford 
College, Haverford, Pennsylvania 19041. 

The admissions office is open from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Mondays 
to Fridays. During the school year it is also open from 9 a.m. to noon 
on Saturdays. The admissions staff is not available to interview candi- 
dates in February and March, when decisions are being made. 

Haverford alumni in various sections of the country have volunteered 
to meet prospective candidates and to give first-hand information about 
us. Their names and addresses can be found toward the rear of this 
catalog under "Alumni Representatives." 

EARLY-DECISION: We offer an early-decision plan for candidates whose 
first choice is Haverford. Early-decision candidates must take the re- 
quired College Board examinations in their junior year of secondary 
school. We must have their application before November 1 of their 
senior year. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS: Haverford College admits a small number of 
transfer students each year. In addition to filing his application, a 
transfer candidate must submit a secondary-school transcript on our 
form, the results of his College Board examinations, a college tran- 
script, and a letter of recommendation from a responsible official of the 
college that he is attending. The application deadline is May 1 ; decisions 
are usually announced in June. 

ADVANCED STANDING: If a student is qualified, he may be permitted to 
omit one of the introductory courses — proceeding directly to work at 
the intermediate level in that subject. Some departments give placement 
examinations to determine a student's qualifications; other departments 
are less formal. 

Students who have taken high-school courses under the Advanced 
Placement Program may take the tests in these subjects given by the 
College Entrance Examination Board each May. If a student does well 
on these tests, we may give him advanced placement, or college credit, 
or both. 

We also may grant credit for work a student does at another college 
before he enters Haverford. To be considered for such credit, the stu- 
dent must arrange to have the transcript of that work sent to us. Under 
our Flexibility Program, a student can make special use of such credits. 

41 



EXPENSES 

We consider a regular student to be one who takes four or more 
courses in a given semester, or who has been granted permission under 
the FlexibiHty Program to carry fewer courses. 

The tuition charge for all regular students is now $2,325 for the 
academic year. For special students, tuition is currently $350 per course, 
per semester. The residence fee is $1,300. There is also a unit fee of 
$175 per year. 

These fees — tuition, residence and unit — total $3,800 per year. We 
expect rising costs will force an increase for the academic year beginning 
in September, 1971. 

The residence fee covers board-and-room charges when college is in 
session. This includes: heat; electric light; weekly housekeeping service; 
and the use of bedroom furniture, including bureau, table, chair, and a 
bed (the linen for which is furnished and laundered by the College). We 
ask students to supply any other furniture they want, plus blankets and 
towels. 

The unit fee covers the following: student activities fee: admission to 
the art series (entertainment and cultural events) ; laboratory fees; health 
fee; accident insurance (a maximum of $1000 within one year of each 
accident); psychological tests when we require them; and a diploma. 

We have four scheduled vacation recesses during the school year: 
Thanksgiving, Christmas, midyear recess, and spring vacation. With 
minor exceptions, student services and facilities and academic facilities 
are closed or drastically curtailed during vacation periods. An extra 
room-charge of $3 per day is made for students remaining on campus 
during the Christmas or spring vacations. 

We also require a $150 deposit, payable in full before the beginning 
of the first semester, to cover the cost of books and any other incidental 
charges that may arise during the school year. On January 15 this 
deposit is brought up to $150 by billing the student for charges already 
made against it. Each student's deposit account must have a balance, 
on May 15, adequate to cover all final charges. If this bill, or any other 
indebtedness, is not paid by the end of the semester, we withhold credits 
for the work performed. Any unspent balance is refunded at the end of 
the academic year. 

Bills are rendered August 15 and January 15 for the following 
semester's tuition, board, room, unit fee, and deposit. They must be 
paid in full before the beginning of the semester. To avoid last minute 

42 



congestion, we ask that bills be paid by mail in advance. If the fees 
are not paid, we won't consider the student as enrolled at the college. 

When a student requires a special diet for medical reasons, and this 
is approved by our physician, we make a charge of $8 weekly. This 
charge may be larger if the special foods are unusually expensive. 

We charge freshmen $35 to cover the cost of their orientation week, 
called customs week. (New students who are not freshmen come for the 
last portion of customs week and are charged a fee of $20). 

A student's official transcript normally will not be sent until all out- 
standing charges — fees, books, library fines and other incidental 
charges — have been paid. 

We do not make a reduction or refund of the tuition charge after the 
first two weeks of any semester; but if a student withdraws before the 
completion of the first two weeks, we'll make a complete refund of his 
tuition. In case of withdrawal or absence because of illness, a full refund 
of the room-and-board fee cannot be made because overhead expenses 
continue. However, if a student withdraws more than four weeks before 
the end of a semester, or is absent because of illness for four weeks or 
more, we'll make a partial refund of the room-and-board fee in the 
amount of $20 for each week of absence. We do not refund the unit fee 
for any reason. 

COLLEGE RESPONSIBILITY: The college is not responsible for loss because 
of fire, theft, or any other cause. Students who want fire insurance can 
get information at the business office. 

MONTHLY PAYMENTS: Students who prefer to pay tuition and other fees 
in monthly instalments may do so through the Bryn Mawr Trust Com- 
pany. Details of this plan, including charges of financing, may be 
obtained from our business office. 

FINANCIAL AID 

For its size, Haverford traditionally has had comparatively large 
endowment and trust funds. The income from these investments, plus 
annual gifts from alumni and other friends, allow us to maintain high 
educational standards and to underwrite a substantial financial-aid pro- 
gram at the same time. But it costs increasingly more to provide a 
quality, liberal education. The body of knowledge expands; new pro- 
grams are required; expenses in general mount; and we constantly seek 
new endowments and trusts. 

43 



In total, it costs about $8,500 per year to give one student a Haver- 
ford education with its low student-faculty ratio, its individual instruction 
by highly qualified teachers and its modern laboratory and library 
facilities. Fortunately, the student is never requii-ed to pay the full cost. 
Our endowment and other funds underwrite a large portion of the 
expense. As a result, each student, whether he receives formal financial 
aid or not, starts out at Haverford with about 55 per cent of the total 
costs of this education paid. Through his tuition and other fees, the 
student pays the remaining 45 per cent. 

The college has many ways to help students who can't meet their 
expenses. More than 35 per cent of our students receive formal financial 
aid from the college, and another 10 per cent receive financial aid from 
other sources. In short, more than 45 per cent of our students get 
financial help — almost half the student body. 

We emphasize that no able student who is seriously interested in 
Haverford should hesitate to apply because of financial reasons. 

The financial aid program — which includes scholarships, loans, and 
jobs — is administered by a committee composed of the director of 
admissions as chairman, the associate dean and the dean of students. 
Aid is awarded on the basis of merit and need. Although no aid is 
awarded for more than one year, it is our practice to continue a student's 
aid if his academic and personal record is satisfactory and his need 
continues. 

Aid is not granted to a student whose previous college bill has not 
been paid in full. 

New students requesting aid must file a Parents Confidential State- 
ment with the College Scholarship Service at the appropriate CSS office 
before January 15th. The applicant can get the CSS form from his 
school guidance officer or directly from CSS at Box 176, Princeton, 
N.J. 18540. 

Students who are enrolled at the college and who need aid must file 
applications with the director of admissions before April 15. 

Further details about financial aid may be obtained from the director 
of admissions. 

PLACEMENT SERVICE 

We have a modest but effective placement service. The alumni office 
maintains current information on jobs open in business, government and 
institutions. We arrange for personnel recruiters to interview our students 
— at the student's request. 



44 

si 

4 



CURRICULUM 

Haverford is a liberal arts college. Its curriculum is designed to 
develop in its students the capacity to learn and to understand, to make 
sound and thoughtful judgments. The requirements for the degree en- 
courage the exercise of these skills in each of the broad fields of human 
knowledge, and a fuller development of them in a single field of 
concentration. 

GUIDELINES FOR LIBERAL EDUCATION 

In its original meaning "liberal" was applied to those arts and sciences 
that were considered worthy of a free man, as opposed to "servile" or 
"mechanical" disciplines. "Liberal education" has persisted as an ideal 
which is not only worthy of a free man but is the means of liberating 
and freeing man by providing him with an understanding and apprecia- 
tion of the tradition that has shaped him and the social and natural 
world in which he lives. 

The purpose of these guidelines is to help the student in planning a 
course of study at Haverford. The student should realize that there are 
many different types of educational experiences that can take place at an 
institution such as Haverford. Each student has a great deal of freedom 
and responsibility in planning his course of study at Haverford. It is 
expected that, with the help of his adviser, a course of study will be 
planned which will be designed to meet the individual's particular inter- 
ests, educational background, and intellectual strengths and weaknesses. 
While there are disagreements about everything that a liberal education 
ought to include, there is a consensus concerning its general shape. 

1 . Written and oral communication. One of the most difficult and 
important skills is the art of writing and speaking lucidly and coherently. 
A student will discover that there are few areas of human knowledge 
that he can explore in depth unless he has perfected his abihty to write 
and speak effectively. These skills will be stressed in the program of 
Freshman Seminars. A student who is weak in the skills of verbal com- 
munication is well advised to take courses which pay greater attention 
to training in this art. 

2. Foreign language. The mastery of a foreign language, ancient or 
modern, can not only deepen the student's appreciation of his own 
language but can increase his sensitivity and understanding of the nature 
of language and can enable him to gain a far more intimate understand- 
ing of different cultures. Since many Haverford students continue their 
education in graduate school, a student ought to know that many gradu- 

45 



ate programs require a reading knowledge of at least two foreign 
languages. 

At present all students are required to take at least one year of foreign 
language study at Haverford unless they can satisfy their language re- 
quirement by examination. But a student who starts the study of a for- 
eign language at Haverford should realize that a single year of study is 
insufficient to achieve minimal competence in reading or speaking. While 
not required, all students are strongly advised to plan to take two or 
more years of formal language study. 

3. Mathematics. One remarkable feature of contemporary intel- 
lectual evolution is the diverse ways in which almost all areas of human 
knowledge have been influenced by the development and application of 
mathematics. Increasingly, mathematics is having an important effect on 
many areas of the humanities and social sciences. It is becoming a lan- 
guage and a tool needed for serious inquiry and understanding of almost 
any area of human knowledge. 

4. Humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. The student 
should realize that this division of the areas of human knowledge is a 
relatively recent development. Some fields that are now considered parts 
of the social sciences were once considered to belong to the humanities, 
just as the natural sciences were once considered parts of natural phil- 
osophy. A primary reason for distinguishing these divisions is that they 
do exhibit different emphases, approaches, techniques, basic concepts, 
and problems. It is expected that every student at Haverford will acquire 
elementary acquaintance with the distinctive approaches, concepts, and 
contributions represented by the humanities, social sciences, and natural 
sciences. This does not mean that students must gain a survey knowledge 
of these three areas. Rather, it is expected that every student will be able 
to write and speak effectively about some aspect of these areas which 
will display his appreciation for distinctive approaches represented by 
these areas of human knowledge. 

In planning his course of study a student should keep these aims in 
mind. Normally students may achieve these aims by taking courses from 
the three divisions of the College. But simply receiving a passing grade 
in a course is not necessarily sufficient, of itself, to achieve this basic 
mastery. A student should view his courses as only one means for 
achieving the mastery expected by the Coflege; he should take advantage 
of other educational means to achieve a knowledge of the humanities, 
social sciences, and natural sciences. 

46 



J 



FRESHMAN PROGRAM 

Each freshman, on entering the College, selects a Freshman Seminar. 
In most cases the teacher of that seminar will also be the student's 
adviser. A tentative selection of courses is accomplished by the freshman 
and his adviser during the orientation (Customs) week. Every effort is 
made by the adviser and others (including the Associate Dean, the 
Dean of Students, his assistant, the counselors, admissions officers, and 
Customs men) to facilitate mutual adaptation between the freshman and 
the College. It is anticipated that freshmen wiU "try out" a variety of 
courses in the first few days of classes and that considerable course 
shifting will occur. A series of standard tests is administered to aU 
entrants within the first few days of the first semester. These tests are 
helpful in guidance and counseling. 

The freshman will be helped to plan a course of study for his first 
four semesters, taking into account the "Guidelines for Liberal 
Education," 

During the spring of his freshman year he v^dll participate in an 
inquiry intended to help him evaluate his progress and program (see 
below). 

Freshman Seminars 

The program of Freshman Seminars is intended to give the student 
an exciting and unique educational experience at the very beginning of 
his college education. While it is generally accepted that students should 
have the chance to experiment with interdepartmental seminars and 
individual projects at an advanced level, the freshman seminar program 
is designed to make these opportunities available to the freshman. 

Freshman Seminars are not intended to be formal introductions to 
the various departments of the College. They are taught by members 
of all divisions of the College, and have interdisciplinary approaches. 

The themes of the seminars represent vital concerns of the faculty and 
have been designed to meet a variety of intellectual interests of the 
incoming freshman. 

The faculty hopes that each student will expose himself to areas of 
knowledge and ways of thinking which may be new to him and which 
may change altogether his ideas about desirable areas of specialization. 
Since it is important that this diversified experience be gained early, the 
faculty strongly recommends that the other three courses in each of the 
freshman semesters be in three different departments. Sophomores 
normally will not be permitted to take more than two courses in the 

47 



same department in any one semester. The Committee on Student Stand- 
ing and Programs will exercise general supervision over unusual combi- 
nations of courses. 

The courses open to freshmen are generally numbered below 200. 
If he is qualified, a freshman may be permitted by the department con- 
cerned and by the Associate Dean to take more advanced courses. 



FRESHMAN INQUIRY* 

In the spring of his freshman year, each student v^ill be required to 
participate in a Freshman Inquiry. The purpose of the Inquiry is to 
advise the student through a review and evaluation of his performance 
and future study plans. 

The Inquiry consists of an oral examination and assessment of circa 
75 minutes. In preparation, all participating students must prepare a 
1 500 word essay describing their current intellectual position and submit 
a justified plan for their future course of study. In addition, students may 
present one example of what they consider to be their own best work. 

In September each freshman and his adviser must draw up a two-year 
study plan keeping in mind the "Guidelines for Liberal Education." A 
copy of this plan must be filed with the Associate Dean for inclusion in 
the student's record. Study plans substantially at variance with the 
"guidelines" must be justified in writing by the adviser. Subsequent 
substantial departures from the plan of study require a written explana- 
tion by the adviser to be submitted to the Associate Dean. 

Inquiry committees normally consist of three faculty members and 
two seniors, the faculty representing the different divisions of the College, 
the seniors to come from different divisions and not from the depart- 
ments of the faculty members. Where possible, the student's adviser will 
be a member of the Inquiry Committee. 

Inquiry committees may simply approve a student's performance and 
study plans, or may approve of his performance but suggest changes in 
his plan of study, and/or require the student to repeat the Inquiry in his 
sophomore year. Committees will discuss their assessment with the 
student present and participating. A written version of each student's 
assessment will be filed with the Recorder who will transmit copies to 
the student and his adviser before registration for the following semester. 

*This applies to the Class of 1974 and those following; some members of the 
Class of 1973 may be required by the Associate Dean and/or the adviser to take 
the Inquiry in the spring of 1971. 

48 



A copy will also be placed in the student's College record, but it will not 
become part of his transcript. 

BACHELOR'S DEGREE 

To graduate from Haverford College a student must complete suc- 
cessfully the equivalent of four years of academic work, a specific 
minimum number of semester courses (see below) and five terms of 
work in physical education taken in the first two years. 

In addition, for the Qass of 1971, a student must include among the 
36 courses required for the degree: the former English 11-12 or its 
equivalent, the courses needed under the distribution requirement, and 
those required by his major department. The requirements for the Class 
of 1972 are the same, except that 34 courses are required for the degree. 

For the Class of 1973 and those following, a student must include 
among the 32 courses required for the degree, one freshman seminar in 
each semester of his first year. He must also take an Inquiry (see above) . 

To avoid undue specialization the College requires that 21* courses 
be passed in departments outside the student's major. Classics majors 
and students with double majors automatically satisfy this requirement. 

A course cannot be used to satisfy a major department requirement 
for the degree if the grade is below 65. 

A degree candidate must also meet the standards of his major depart- 
ment in work designed to provide, in his senior year, a synthesis and 
evaluation of his work in the department. 

Each student is accountable to himself and to the College (through 
the Committee on Student Standing and Programs) for the use to which 
he puts his talents and the resources of the College. This means that a 
student who is passing may be dropped and one who is failing may be 
permitted to continue. Although he may be permitted to continue at the 
College by the Committee on Student Standing and Programs, a student 
who fails to pass at least eight semester courses will be considered 
academically deficient, as will one who barely passes his courses in any 
semester beginnmg with his sophomore year. 

Through the Academic Flexibility Program described later, a student 
may introduce variations in programs to meet his particular needs. 

The degree conferred upon candidates meeting the requirements is 
that of Bachelor of Arts, or, upon request from students majoring in the 
natural sciences, mathematics, or engineering. Bachelor of Science. 

* 19 for the Class of 1972 and those following. 

49 



Course Load 

A normal course load for each semester is considered to be four 
courses.* Any student is free to take more than the number of courses 
required for the degree, but to take more than five at one time he must 
have had a sufficiently strong record the preceding semester, as judged 
by the Associate Dean. To take fewer than four courses in any semester, 
a student must secure the approval of the Committee on Student Stand- 
ing and Programs, with the exception that he may take three and one- 
half courses in one semester providing he takes four and one-half in the 
other. 

Course Intensification 

The College believes that experience in a wide diversity of courses 
is an essential part of a Haverford education, but the College also 
recognizes that students may sometimes profit from the opportunity to 
work more intensively in a smaller number of subjects. Therefore, with 
the approval of his adviser, a student may register, with the instructor's 
permission, for double credit in one course and, in unusual cases, in 
more than one. In a double-credit course, the student undertakes an 
approved program of independent study in conjunction with a regular 
course and submits a paper or passes an examination based on his 
independent work. Such independent work is not suitable in all subjects, 
and the instructor of the course must be the final judge of whether or 
not it should be attempted. In unusual cases a student may apply to the 
Committee on Student Standing and Programs for permission to pursue 
a reduced program without enrolling in a double-credit course. 

Distribution Requirement^ 
By the end of his sophomore year a student must have passed the 
former English 11-12 or its equivalent, and in addition at least two 
semester courses in each of the three divisions of the College. For the 
purposes of this requirement courses cross-listed between departments 
in two divisions will count only in the division in which they are actually 
taught. General courses meet distribution requirements in the division 
in which they are actually taught. Elementary and intermediate language 
courses may not be counted toward distribution requirements. 

The departments of the College (including Bryn Mawr departments 
of Archaeology, Geology, History of Art and Italian, for which Haver- 
ford has no counterparts) are divided into three divisions as follows: 

*Prior to the academic year 1969-70 the normal course load was five courses each 
semester during the first two years and four each semester during the last two. 
tThis applies to the Classes of 1971 and 1972. 

50 



I 



Humanities: Archaeology, Classics, English, Fine Arts, French, Ger- 
man, History of Art, Italian, Music, Philosophy, 
Religion, Russian and Spanish. 

Natural Sciences: Astronomy, Biology, Chemistry, Engineering, Geol- 
ogy, Mathematics and Physics. 

Social Sciences: Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology, 
and Sociology and Anthropology. 

Courses taken at Bryn Mawr College will be accepted as satisfying 
distribution requirements, but not normally courses taken elsewhere. For 
transfer students, credit toward distribution requirements for work 
already done is evaluated by the Associate Dean at the time of admission. 

Foreign Languages 

In order to graduate, a student whose native language is English must 
complete one year of a foreign language at Haverford or two years' work 
by qualifying examination. 

At the time a student is admitted to a department his major super- 
visor, in consultation with the student and his language instructors, will 
decide whether the student's projected upperclass work and special 
interests require him to pursue additional language study, and if so, 
what study is required. 

Free Electives 

A number of courses sufficient to bring the total to at least the num- 
ber of semester courses required for the degree shall be chosen by the 
student in consultation with his faculty adviser, with the understanding 
that the College reserves the right, through the adviser and the Associate 
Dean, to prevent unreasonable combinations. 

N on- Academic Requirements and Electives 

In addition to the semester courses of academic work required, five 
terms of non-academic work in physical education are required of each 
student during the freshman and sophomore years, unless the student is 
excused on medical grounds. Students may select courses for credit 
from among offerings in intercollegiate, intramural, and instructional 
activities, or they may propose project courses for the approval of the 
department chairman. The non-academic program offers courses in 
three nine-week terms in the fall, winter and spring. 

51 



Students who fail to fulfill the non-academic work requirement may 
not be permitted to continue at the College. All cases of failure to fulfill 
the requirement will be reviewed by a committee consisting of the dean 
of students, the chairman of the physical education department and two 
students. 

Major Concentration 

Specific requirements for Major Concentration are stated under the 
name of each department. During the fourth semester of his attendance, 
each student should confer with the major supervisor of the department 
in which he wishes to major, and apply to him for written approval of a 
program of courses for the last four semesters. Such a program must 
provide for the completion, by the end of the senior year, of approxi- 
mately 1 2 semester courses, or the equivalent, at least six of which must 
be in the major department and the others in closely related fields. 
Should the student's application be rejected by all departments in which 
he is interested, he should consult the Associate Dean. Each student is 
expected to file with the Associate Dean, before the date specified on 
the College calendar, a copy of his major program signed by his major 
supervisor. Any student who continues delinquent in this matter, 
unless he is excused by the Associate Dean, will be debarred from the 
final examinations in his fourth semester. Should the student's application 
be rejected by all the departments to which he applies, he will not be 
permitted to continue at the College. 

A student who applies for permission to become a major in any 
department may be rejected for scholastic reasons only. The College 
rule on this point is: 

If, at the time specified for application, the average of the grades 
obtained by a student in the "preliminary courses"* of any de- 
partment is 75 or above, the student will be accepted by that 
department. 

If the average of the grades obtained in these courses is below 
70, the student will be accepted in that department only under 
exceptional circumstances. 

If the average of the grades obtained in these courses is 70 or 
above, but below 75, the decision will be at the discretion of the 
major supervisor. 

^"Preliminary courses" are any courses the student may already have taken in 
the department to which he is applying. If the applicant has not already taken 
any courses in that department, the department may name courses in other 
departments which are to be regarded as "preliminary." 

52 



A student who has been formally accepted as a major by any depart- 
ment has the right to remain as a major in that department as long as 
he is in college. Should he wish to change from one department to 
another after the beginning of his fifth semester, the change can be made 
only with the consent of the new major supervisor and the Associate 
Dean. 

The College affirms the responsibility of each department to make the 
work in the major field as comprehensive as possible for the senior. 
There is a need, in the senior year especially, to challenge the student's 
powers of analysis and synthesis and to foster the creative use of the 
knowledge and skills that he has acquired in his previous studies. There 
is also the need to evaluate the performance of the senior in the field of 
his major, not only to safeguard the academic standards of the College 
but to help the student discover where he stands at this moment in his 
career. In short, synthesis and evaluation in some form are both essential. 

While upholding these educational objectives, the College recognizes 
that they may be achieved by various means, such as (1) a Senior 
Departmental Study course, at the end of which the student takes a 
comprehensive examination, (2) a thesis or advanced project paper, 
(3) a course or courses specially designed or designated, or (4) some 
combination of these or other means. 

Each department, therefore, in its statement of major requirements 
is expected to specify the particular mode of synthesis and form of 
evaluation that it has adopted for the senior year. 

Examinations in courses in the major subject taken in the last 
semester of the senior year may be omitted at the discretion of the 
major supervisor. 

Courses taken in summer school will not satisfy Haverford course 
requirements for the major unless prior written approval is granted by 
the major supervisor. 

A student who has demonstrated unusual maturity and who has 
special interests and abilities may be permitted to arrange an inter- 
departmental major. The program of courses and the nature of the 
comprehensive examination will be worked out at the time the major is 
selected by the student in consultation with, and subject to, the approval 
of the chairmen of the departments concerned, one of whom will be 
designated as major supervisor for that student. The permission of the 
Associate Dean is also required for an interdepartmental major. 

In rare cases, and only for high-ranking students, a double major may 
be arranged, in which the student takes the complete major in each of 

53 



two departments. In order to take a double major, a student must re- 
ceive permission from the Associate Dean as well as from the chairman 
of each of the departments concerned. 

It is possible for a student, through the Academic Flexibility Program, 
to design his own major. 

There also exists (largely through the initiative of an interested stu- 
dent) an Urban Studies major, described in detail elsewhere in this 
catalog, which allows a focus provided by none of the departments of 
the College but which is based on work offered by the departments. 

Independent Study Courses 

Most departments offer Independent Study Courses, numbered 480f 
and 480i, for the purpose of encouraging independent work by qualified 
students. These courses provide opportunities to investigate topics not 
covered in formal courses, to do extensive reading on a subject, to do 
field work, or to do library research. A student wishing to undertake 
independent study must secure the permission of his adviser for the 
project and of a faculty supervisor prior to registering for the course. 
Members of the faculty are under no obligation to supervise Independent 
Study Courses. Independent study done without faculty supervision 
will not be given College credit. Requirements such as examinations or 
papers are determined jointly by the instructor and the student. Written 
evaluation of the work performed may be submitted in place of a 
numerical grade. 

A student may register for only one credit of Independent Study per 
term. These courses are normally of half-credit value unless specified 
for a full credit by the instructor. To undertake more than one, he must 
secure permission from the Committee on Student Standing and Pro- 
grams. A student wishing to explore more thoroughly a subject covered 
in an existing course is urged not to undertake an Independent Study 
Course, but to consider the "double credit" option. 

FINAL HONORS 

Final Honors are awarded to students who have undertaken and 
carried through academic work of high quality. Final Honors are of two 
kinds, those awarded by departments and those awarded by the College. 

1. The exact nature of departmental Honors work and the criteria 
used in judging it are listed in the departmental statements in this 
catalog. For Honors the work in the department must be considerably 

54 



superior to that required for graduation, including a demonstration of 
the student's competence, insight and commitment to his field of interest. 

Individual departments may award Honors to students whose depart- 
mental work has been of high quality and High Honors to those who 
have demonstrated both high quality and originality, indicating an 
unusual degree of competence. 

2. Students who have been awarded Departmental Honors may be 
invited by the Committee on Student Standing and Programs to stand for 
College Honors: magna cum laude or summa cum laude. Magna 
cum laude indicates that a student has understood to a superior degree 
the significant relations between the area of his own specialized com- 
petence and his College work as a whole. Summa cum laude indicates 
an even more outstanding achievement. Magna cum laude and summa 
cum laude are awarded by the faculty on recommendation of the 
Committee. 

The Committee on Student Standing and Programs will fix the mini- 
mum academic standards and procedures acceptable in any year for 
magna cum laude and summa cum laude and may require oral and/or 
written examinations or essays. 



FLEXIBILITY PROGRAM 

Since different students have different needs, abilities, and goals, there 
may be cases where the general regulations prevent a student from 
making the best use of educational opportunities at Haverford. Provision 
is therefore made for changing the normal requirements in certain 
individual cases. 

Power to act on requests for exceptions to any of the academic regu- 
lations is in the hands of a standing committee of the faculty, called 
the Committee on Student Standing and Programs, which consists of 
three faculty members, the Associate Dean of the College and three 
students. Before granting an exception, the committee will secure ap- 
proval from the student's major supervisor or, if the student is an under- 
classman, from his adviser. Any student who believes that a special 
course program would promote his best intellectual development, is 
invited to present a proposal to this group. Students with exceptional 
abilities or exceptional preparation or both are encouraged to consider 
whether a program out of the ordinary may help them to make the 
most of their opportunities. The College suggests consideration of the 
following, as examples of special programs which might be followed: 

55 



Enrichment and Independent Study. Students with outstanding 
records who have the approval of the appropriate departmental chairmen 
and the Committee on Student Standing and Programs may depart from 
the usual course patterns. Three examples follow: 

(a) A student admitted to the Thesis Program may enroll in his 
senior year in as few as three courses, and complete a thesis 
based on independent work. 

(b) A student admitted to an Interdepartmental Program must first 
have been accepted as an interdepartmental major (the two 
departments need not be in the same division). His program, 
which may include a reduced course load and a thesis, as in (a) 
above, will also include some advanced independent work re- 
lating to both departments. 

(c) A student admitted to a Concentrated Program will be permitted 
more than the usual amount of concentration, taking in each of 
two or three of his last four semesters, two double-credit courses 
in his major field, or a closely related field. 

Students who meet the standards set by departments for Honors may 
be granted departmental or interdepartmental Honors for these programs. 

Graduation in less than eight Haverford semesters. Students with 
extra credits, gained from the Advanced Placement Program, summer 
school, or carrying an overload, or from some combination of these, 
may be able to finish requirements for the Haverford degree in less than 
the normal four years. Other students may obtain credit for a year's 
work under either the Study Abroad or the Junior Year Language pro- 
grams. Such students, like transfer students, may graduate after fewer 
than eight semesters at Haverford, but with the usual number of course 
credits. 

Sufficiently mature students, if they possess outstanding ability or are 
judged to have legitimate reason for special consideration, may be al- 
lowed to graduate without necessarily accumulating all of the credits 
normally required. The Committee on Student Standing and Programs 
may apprave an individual student course program for graduation with 
fewer than the usual number of courses. Three examples of possible 
programs are: 

(a) Graduation after three years: A student who has done consist- 
ently good work and who, by the beginning of his second year at 
Haverford, has credit for 15* or more courses, may request per- 

*12 for the Class of 1973 and those following. i| 

56 



mission to graduate after only two more years at the College. 
If such permission is granted, it will be with the proviso that he 
must maintain a very high level of performance and, to help 
assure sufficient breadth in his program, he must not only meet 
the usual distribution and minimum departmental require- 
ments, but must study for four consecutive semesters some 
subjects (or meaningful combination of subjects) outside of the 
division in which his major department lies. His continuation 
in this program is subject to review, before he enters his senior 
year, by the Committee and by his major supervisor. 

(b) A term away from Haver ford: There may be occasion when a 
student's needs are best served by studying or serving elsewhere 
for a time, without gaining formal academic credit, as he would 
if he were in a program like Study Abroad. A student accepted 
into the "term away" program must meet all departmental and 
distribution requirements, and must successfully complete a 
total of seven semesters at Haverford and at least one semester 
elsewhere (or six at Haverford, and two or more elsewhere) en- 
gaged in a program (academic, service to others, gainful employ- 
ment, etc.) approved in advance by the Committee on Student 
Standing and Programs and by his major supervisor, and evalu- 
ated by them after completion. 

(c) Reduced course load: The course requirement in effect at 
Haverford helps to assure the diversity which is an important 
part of a liberal education. There may, however, be students 
who could profit by carrying fewer then the normal number of 
courses each semester. The Committee on Student Standing and 
Programs is authorized to permit some students, where good 
reason can be shown, to omit one of their courses. 

Graduation in more than eight Haverford semesters. Although 
most students are expected to graduate in four academic years, some, as 
indicated above, may take less and some may be permitted to take more. 

Students who wish to take a five-year program with no modification 
of requirements should secure the approval of their adviser and of the 
Associate Dean. In all other cases of extended programs, even if no 
modification of academic requirements is involved, the student should 
petition the Committee on Student Standing and Programs. 

Examples of the latter would include students with physical handicaps 
which prevent them from carrying a full load, students who wish to 
complete a program in four and one-half years, and students who wish 

57 



to take, simultaneously with their work at Haverford, part-time work 
elsewhere (such as journalism, design, etc.) for which academic credit 
at Haverford is not appropriate. All petitions for academic flexibility 
should be submitted in writing to the Associate Dean who will present 
them to the Committee on Student Standing and Programs. To be con- 
sidered, a petition must bear the written endorsement of the student's 
adviser. 

FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM 

Haverford offers a five-year program in addition to its regular four- 
year program. 

A student becomes eligible for the five-year program by demonstration 
of compelling educational necessity for such a program to his adviser 
and to the Associate Dean. If, in the judgment of the Associate Dean, 
modification of the normal requirements is involved, the student must 
also secure the approval of the Committee on Student Standing and 
Programs. 

Students will normally be expected to request admission to the pro- 
gram during their sophomore or junior years. 

DEVELOPMENTAL READING 

A program of developmental reading, under the supervision of the 
counselors, offers an opportunity for students to improve their reading 
and study proficiency. Few students, if any, have realized their real 
potentiality in this field. Through a series of conferences, and some 
group sessions, methods of developing higher level reading skills are 
explored and practiced. Any student who is willing to concentrate upon 
it, while reading for his various subjects, will find that he can increase 
his speed and comprehension. 

PREPARATION FOR PROFESSIONS 

A large number of Haverford College students plan, after graduation, 
to enter upon further courses of study. As a liberal arts college, Haver- 
ford arranges its curriculum so that students who have such plans are 
able to meet the entrance requirements of graduate and professional 
schools. The College does not, however, attempt to anticipate in its own 
curriculum the work of any graduate or professional school. It is the 
conviction of the faculty that the best preparation for graduate work is 
a liberal education with sound training in basic disciplines, to which 
more specialized training may later be added. 

58 



A student who intends to go to a professional school is free to choose 
his major in accord with his principal abilities and interests, since pro- 
fessional schools, such as those of business administration, education, 
law, medicine, or theology, usually accept students on the basis of merit 
regardless of their choice of major and, except in the case of medical 
schools, without specific course requirements. The requirements of most 
state boards of medical licensure are such that all students who hope 
to be admitted to a medical school must take two semester courses, 
each of which must include laboratory work, in biology (usually Biology 
002a and Biology 100), Chemistry 107a, 108b, 202b, 203a, and 
Physics 113 a, 114b. 

Students who plan to go to professional schools should seek advice 
as early as possible from appropriate faculty members as follows: 
education, Mr. Lyons; engineering, Mr. Hetzel; international affairs, 
Mr. Hansen; law, Mr. Mortimer; medicine, Mr. Kessler; theology, Mr. 
Luman. 

If a student plans to do graduate work in a departmental subject, 
such as economics, mathematics, history, etc., he should consult as early 
as possible with the chairman of the department at Haverford which 
most nearly corresponds to the department in which he plans to work 
in graduate school. This adviser will be able to guide him in his selection 
of courses, his choice of major (which will not necessarily be in the 
department of his intended graduate study), and other questions which 
may have bearing on his future. 

Law schools, medical schools, and some graduate schools require 
applicants to take special admission tests. Arrangements for taking 
these tests are the responsibility of the student concerned; he can obtain 
information about them from the faculty members mentioned above. 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

The academic regulations of Bryn Mawr College will apply to Haver- 
ford students enrolled in Bryn Mawr courses. Administrative interpreta- 
tions or decisions will be made by the deans at Bryn Mawr. 

Bryn Mawr students in Haverford courses are subject to Haverford 
regulations as applied and interpreted by the Associate Dean. 

Conflicting Courses 

A student is not allowed to elect conflicting courses, except with the 
permission of the Associate Dean and the two instructors concerned. 

59 



Audited Courses 

A student who wishes to audit a course should obtain the permission 
of the instructor. No charge is made for auditing, and audited courses 
are not hsted on the transcript. 



Course Changes 

Courses may be changed during the first two weeks of each new 
semester. During that time students are free to make changes after 
consultation with their advisers and the Associate Dean. 

Changes will not be permitted later except in cases where the student 
is known to be an excellent student and where he receives the consent 
of the professor to whose course he is changing and of his adviser and 
of the Associate Dean. 

A student who has registered for a fifth course may drop that course 
without penalty at any time before the end of the fourth week of classes 
with the approval of his adviser and the Associate Dean. 



Lecture and Laboratory Courses 

With the approval of the instructor in the course, the student's adviser, 
and the Associate Dean, a student may take for credit either the labora- 
tory work or the class work of a course which normally includes both. 
The grade received is recorded on the student's transcript with the 
notation "Lecture only" or "Laboratory only," as the case might be. 

Such a course is not included among the courses required for gradua- 
tion, nor among the courses required outside the student's major 
department, nor among the courses needed to meet a limited elective 
requirement. 

Evaluation of Academic Performance 

The instructor in each course submits at the end of each semester a 
numerical grade, or in some senior seminars, a viTitten evaluation for 
each student. A grade of "CIP" (course in progress) may be sub- 
mitted at midyear for senior research courses which run throughout 
the year, and for certain other courses as agreed on by the instructor and 
the Associate Dean, and so announced at the beginning of the course. 

Passing grades at Haverford range from 60 to 100 inclusive. Failing 
grades range from 45 to 59 inclusive (the lowest grade given to a student 
who completes a course is 45 ) . 

60 



If a student drops a course, or is required by his instructor to drop 
it, the grade is recorded as "DR" and counts as a 40. If a student is 
permitted to withdraw from a course for unusual reasons including those 
beyond the student's control, such as illness, it is recorded as "W" and 
is not assigned a numerical grade, nor regarded as a failure. 

The Committee on Student Standing and Programs reviews students' 
records at intervals, and has authority to drop students from college, or 
to set requirements for additional work in cases of students whose work 
is unsatisfactory. As a rule, the Committee will drop from college 
freshmen who do not pass their courses, and those upperclassmen who 
do not show work which is better than passing. The normal expectation 
is that each year a student's work should show noticeable improvement. 
Furthermore, any student whose record is such as to justify the belief 
that he is not availing himself of the opportunities offered by the College 
may be dropped at any time the Committee makes such a determmation. 

In a year course in which the work of the second semester depends 
heavily on that of the first, a student who fails the first semester but 
nevertheless is allowed to continue may receive credit for the first 
semester (although the grade will not be changed) if his grade for the 
second semester is 70 or above, provided that the instructor in the course 
states in writing to the Recorder at the beginning of the second semester 
that this arrangement applies. 

A student who, because of special circumstances such as illness, re- 
ceives a low grade in a course, may petition his instructor and the Asso- 
ciate Dean for a special examination. If the request is granted and the 
student takes the special examination, the grade in that examination will 
replace the grade originally received in the midyear or final examination 
in computing the final grade for that course; the new course grade will be 
entered in place of the old on the student's transcript, and the semester 
average will be revised accordingly. 

Policy on Release of Student Grades 
Received during the First Two Years 

Grades received by students at Haverford College during their first 
two years are intended for internal use. The intention of the faculty is 
to recognize the first two years as a time prior to majoring, when students 
should be encouraged to do the maximum of experimentation m new 
areas where their interest may be high but their aptitude may be untested. 

The official transcript records only whether a student dropped, failed 
or withdrew from a course. The absence of any notation is an indication 
that he passed. 

61 



The Associate Dean of the College makes all decisions on any ex- 
ceptions to this policy. The student's request is a necessary, but not 
always a sufficient, condition for the release of grades. 

Normally, grades for the first two years are released only to another 
college or university when the student is transferring during the first two 
years. 

Courses taken in the first two years which are directly related to the 
student's intended graduate study, may be released to graduate or to 
professional schools. 

Grades are not provided for use by insurance companies. 

Late Papers 

If a paper is assigned in place of the final examination in a course, 
the date by which it is due may be set by the instructor not later than 
4:00 p.m. on Wednesday, January 13th, 1971, for the first semester, or 
Tuesday, May 18th, 1971, for the second semester. Laboratory note- 
books must be turned in not later than these same dates. Late papers or 
notebooks will be given one-half of the grade they would have received, 
unless arrangements have been made in advance with the instructor in 
the course and the Associate Dean. If a paper represents the entire grade 
for a course, the maximum grade for such a late paper is 60 or, in a 
course required for the major, 65. Full details of academic procedures 
and regulations concerning the proper completion of work are issued 
during each semester. 

Courses Taken Without Recorded Grade 
Each semester juniors and seniors may elect one course outside the 
division of their major department, for which no grade will be recorded 
on the transcript. A notation will be made, however, if the student fails, 
drops, or is permitted to withdraw from the course. Students must 
inform the Recorder of a course to be so handled by the end of the 
fourth week of classes. 

Courses with Written Evaluation 
In certain senior seminars, a department may choose to give a brief 
written evaluation of performance instead of a numerical grade. These 
evaluations will be attached to the transcript record and will serve in 
place of numerical grades in those courses. Where such evaluation is to 
be used, this fact will be announced to the students at the time of 
registration. 

I 
62 



INTERCOLLEGIATE COOPERATION 

The variety of courses available to Haverford students is gready 
increased as a result of a cooperative relationship among Haverford, 
Bryn Mawr College, Swarthmore College, and the University of Penn- 
sylvania. Under this arrangement, full-time students of any of these 
institutions may, upon presentation of the proper credentials, enroll for 
courses at another institution of the group without added expense. 

Students wishing to take advantage of this arrangement must obtain 
the permission of the Associate Dean. 

Haverford students taking courses at the University of Pennsylvania 
are expected to make their own arrangements for transportation. Bryn 
Mawr and Haverford jointly operate two buses which make regular 
hourly trips between the two campuses on weekdays, and a bus operates 
several times a day between Haverford and Bryn Mawr and Swarthmore. 

STUDY ABROAD 

Well-qualified students who request it may be granted permission to 
spend a semester or a year studying in a foreign country. Such permis- 
sion will require approval of the student's major supervisor and the 
Associate Dean. If the student is not a language major, approval will 
also be required of the chairman of the department of the language 
spoken in the country selected. Interested students should consult the 
Associate Dean early in the sophomore year; he will direct them to 
faculty members best qualified to advise them. Students who may want to 
take their entire junior year abroad should plan their programs so that 
all limited elective requirements are completed by the end of the sopho- 
more year. The program of studies abroad must be worked out in 
advance; if the program is completed successfully, the College wiU grant 
credit toward the degree for the work accomplished. Scholarship funds 
may be transferred for approved study abroad. 

JUNIOR-YEAR LANGUAGE PROGRAM 

Provision is made, through a cooperative program with Princeton 
University, for the intensive study of certain languages not offered at 
Haverford — Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, Persian, and Turkish. A stu- 
dent participating in this program spends the summer after his sopho- 
more year in a program of intensive study of the language chosen, and 
then spends the junior year at Princeton University, continuing the 
.study of the language and taking each semester two or three other 

63 



courses in related regional studies. The remainder of his program will 
be electives, usually courses important for his major at Haverford. 

Students interested in this program should confer with the Associate 
Dean in the early spring of the sophomore year. To be nominated by the 
College, a student must have a good academic record, and must have 
secured the approval of his major supervisor. Selection from among 
the nominees is made by Princeton University. 

Students who wish to study the less common languages without taking 
time away from Haverford should consider the offerings in Italian at 
Bryn Mawr College and in Oriental, Scandinavian, and Slavic lan- 
guages at the University of Pennsylvania. Arrangements for taking such 
courses may be made in consultation with the Associate Dean. 

AFRICAN STUDIES 

Students wishing to focus their interest on African civilization are 
encouraged to enroll in courses emphasizing African materials offered 
by several departments in the humanities and social sciences at Haver- 
ford, Bryn Mawr and Swarthmore Colleges and to arrange for regional 
concentration in fulfilling departmental requirements for majors. In 
planning their programs, students should consult Professor Harvey 
Glickman, director of African studies, or Professor Wyatt MacGaffey. 

VISITORS AND LECTURES 

Individual departments of the faculty invite visitors to Haverford for 
varying periods of time to meet with members of the department and 
with students interested in that field. These departmental visitors, who 
sometimes give public lectures, contribute considerably to the vitality of 
the work in the various departments. 

This program has been greatly strengthened as a result of a generous 
bequest from the late William P. Philips. A substantial sum from this 
bequest is used to bring to Haverford "distinguished scientists and states- 
men," whose visits may last anywhere from a few hours to a full aca- 
demic year. 

CENTER FOR NONVIOLENT RESOLUTION OF CONFLICT 

Haverford College has long had a special concern for the peaceful 
resolution of conflict, particularly where it involves interracial or inter- 
national relations. Current urban unrest and increasing violence among ' 
nation-states call for new approaches to conciliation and problem-solving. 

64 



Young men, faced with involvement in war and with racial injustice 
that conflicts with their basic values, have a special concern for seeking 
constructive ways by which to influence the course of such conflicts 
away from war and domestic violence. 

Haverford's tradition also includes a commitment to encourage and 
work for social and political change that assures an individual's dignity, 
economic justice in society, and the opportunity for the fullest develop- 
ment of a man's potential regardless of his origins — all brought about 
by nonviolent means. 

These concerns for creative resolution of violent conflict and for 
nonviolent means of inducing change have led the College to provide for 
the establishment of a Center for Nonviolent Conflict Resolution. In 
the Center program, students and faculty, in seminars, in individual and 
group research projects, and in action programs increase their under- 
standing of human conflict and its relationship to change, and explore 
ways of developing nonviolent means for limiting it. 

The Center is supported by a grant from the Ford Foundation, by 
means of which it operates two programs in urban poverty neighbor- 
hoods and one in suburban Philadelphia, in all of which Haverford 
students may participate for academic credit. The objective of both urban 
and suburban programs is to promote a healthy mixture of detachment 
and involvement that encourages both relevant scholarship and enlight- 
ened service for change. Further information on the Educational In- 
volvement Program is provided elsewhere in this catalog. 

The Center program is concerned as well with international peace and 
nonviolent change. An International Affairs Internship is being de- 
veloped with the American Friends Service Committee. 

Students interested in the program should consult Paul Wehr, director 
of the Center. 

THE MARGARET GEST CENTER FOR THE 
CROSS-CULTURAL STUDY OF RELIGION 

The establishment of the Center was made possible by a bequest of 
Margaret Gest in memory of her parents, Emily Judson Baugh Gest and 
John Marshall Gest. In keeping with Miss Gest's desires and will, the 
Center aims "to promote better understanding among peoples" through 
the study of the "fundamental unity of religions" without "negating the 
differences." The current Center program is supported by a friend of 
_ Margaret Gest. 

65 



The Center is under the direction of Professor Gerhard Spiegler and 
a College Advisory Council. The following courses of lectures are 
supported by the Center: 

1. Philosophy East and West. Mr. Desjardins 

2. Religious Traditions in India: Ancient and Modern. Mr. Long 

3. The History of Western Religious Thought 

and Institutions. Mr. Luman 

4. History and Principles of Quakerism. Mr. Bronner 

T. WISTAR BROWN FELLOWSHIP 

Haverford College has resources available from the T. Wistar Brown 
Fund which make it possible to provide a Fellowship each year for a 
mature scholar. The recipient of this Fellowship usually spends most of 
his time doing research in the Quaker Collection of the Library. The 
Fellowship currently carries a stipend of $6,000. 

Inquiries regarding this Fellowship should be addressed to the office 
of the Provost. 

POST-BACCALAUREATE FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM 

Under this program, established in 1966, fellowships are awarded to 
young men and women of promise who can profit by studying for a 
year at a highly demanding liberal arts college after receiving the 
bachelor's degree and before entering graduate or professional school. 
It is supported by substantial grants from the Rockefeller Foundation 
and the Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation and smaller grants from several 
other sources. Most of the scholarships have been awarded to graduates 
of the predominantly Negro colleges of the South. 

For the academic year 1970-71, support is available for approximately 
30 students interested in earning a Ph.D. degree and following careers 
of college or university teaching and research, and for 24 students inter- 
ested in medicine. Fellows for this year will study at Bryn Mawr, Haver- 
ford, Oberlin, Pomona, and Swarthmore Colleges. They will choose 
their courses from the regular offerings, selecting those they feel will 
best fill their scholarly needs and interests. 

HONOR SOCIETIES 

Phi Beta Kappa. The Haverford College Chapter of the Phi Beta 

Kappa Society of America was chartered in 1898 as Zeta of Pennsyl-' 
vania. Election of members-in-course, alumni members, and honorary 

66 



members, based upon scholarly attainment and distinction, takes place 
toward the end of the academic year. 

President, Bernard V. Lentz '33; Secretary, Holland Hunter '43; 
Treasurer, John Davison '51. 

Founders Club. The Founders Club was established in 1914 as a 
Haverford organization of students, alumni, and faculty. Election to its 
membership is recognition of a sound academic record combined with 
noteworthy participation in extracurricular activities. Undergraduate 
elections are usually limited to the junior and senior classes. President, 
E. Howard Bedrossian '42; Secretary, Robert Ihrie, Jr. '70; Treasurer, 
Matthew M. Strickler '62. 



67 



•\ 




*.< 



■J^ 



^- 



* 




"imsn 



^ ^.dai^^ 






COURSES 

OF 

IIMSTRUCTIOrJ 




'^K^MUj^H^Ki^MuaiS 



NUMBERING SYSTEM 

001-099 indicate elementary and intermediate courses. 

100-199 indicate first year courses in the major work. 

200-299 indicate second-year courses in the major work. 

300-399 indicate advanced courses in the major work. 

400-499 indicate special categories of work (e.g., 480 for independent 
study courses). 

a . . . the letter "a" following a number, indicates a one-credit course 
given in the first semester. 

b . . . the letter "b" following a number, indicates a one-credit course 
given in the second semester. 

c . . . the letter "c" following a number, indicates a one-credit course 
given two hours a week throughout the year. 

d ... the letter "d" following a number, indicates a half-credit course 
given during September-October. 

e ... the letter "e" following a number indicates a half-credit course 
given during November-December. 

f ... the letter "f" following a number indicates a half-credit course 
given throughout the first semester. 

g ... the letter "g" following a number indicates a half-credit course 
given during February-March. 

h ... the letter "h" following a number indicates a half-credit course 
given during April-May. 

i ... the letter "i" following a number indicates a half-credit course 
given throughout the second semester. 

In general, courses listed as full-year courses (two credits) must be 
carried through two semesters. In some cases one semester of such a 
course may be taken with credit, but only with permission of the 
department concerned. Students are reminded that one course carried 
throughout the year is the equivalent of eight semester hours. 



70 



I 







ASTRONOMY ^ 

CO 

Professor Louis C. Green, Chairman j 

Associate Professor R. Bruce Partridge f wk 



The departmental work is designed to give students an understanding Tl 
of and an interest in the universe in which they hve. The relation of 
astronomy to other fields of learning is kept to the fore. 



MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

The normal major requirements are Astronomy 211a, 212b and four addi- 
tional 1-semester courses numbered above 300; Mathematics 113a and 114b, or 
119a; Physics 115a and 116b, or the former 19; three written comprehensive 
examinations of three hours each. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

All astronomy majors are regarded as candidates for Honors. The award of 
Honors will be made on the basis of superior work in the departmental courses, 
in certain related courses, and in the comprehensive examinations. 

101a THE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPACT OF ASTRONOMICAL IDEAS 

Mr. Partridge 
A non-technical introduction to the astronomer's view of the universe. In 
general, a historical approach is used, from the ideas of Copernicus and 
Galileo, through the early astrophysicists of the last century, to Einstein 
and Hubble. The course will attempt to show how astronomical discoveries 
have fundamentally altered our ways of perceiving the universe. 

102b ASTRONOMY OF THIS DECADE Mr. Partridge 

Some of the important astronomical discoveries of this decade are discussed 
semi-quantitatively. Emphasis is placed on objects such as pulsars and 
quasars which have greatly extended the range of our knowledge of the 
physical world, on new and puzzling phenomena such as gravity waves, and 
on results obtained through the space program. Prerequisite to Astronomy 
102b is Astronomy 101a or the consent of the instructor. 

121a THE SOLAR SYSTEM Mr. Green 

This introductory course develops the dynamics necessary for an under- 
standing of the principal motions and interactions of the bodies in the solar 
system. The vector model of atomic and molecular structure is discussed 
and used to interpret the spectra of the planets, comets, and sun. This in- 
formation together with that available from direct observation from the 
earth's surface and from space is united in a discussion of the origin of the 

tAppointed on the Sloan Foundation Grant. 

71 



solar system. Optional observation periods, as well as an opportunity for 
students to use the telescopes on their own. Prerequisite: Mathematics 113a 
or the consent of the instructor. 

122b STARS AND GALAXIES Mr. Green 

This introductory course deals with the dynamics, characteristics, and physi- 
cal conditions of the different kinds of objects found in the universe, stars, 
clouds of diffuse matter, and various types of galaxies, as derived from 
direct observation and from spectroscopic and theoretical studies. The evolu- 
tion and interaction of these components of our universe and the probable 
history of the universe as a whole are reviewed. Optional observation 
periods, and opportunities for individual use of the telescopes. Prerequisite: 
Astronomy 121a or the consent of the instructor. 

211a, 212b METHODS OF THEORETICAL PHYSICS AND 

ASTROPHYSICS Mr. Green 

Ordinary and partial differential equations as well as certain integral equa- 
tions of astronomy and physics are discussed. Attention is given to the more 
important special function, Sturm-Liouville theory. Green's functions, and 
boundary value problems. Approximate solutions are sought by linearization, 
perturbation, and variational procedures, with some use of numerical 
methods. Applications will be to the quantum mechanics of atomic, molecu- 
lar, and nuclear structure and collisions, the Hamilton-Jacobi theory of 
satellite and planetary motion, the mechanics of deformable bodies as 
applied to astronomical problems, and radiative transport. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 113a and 114b, or 119a, and Physics 115a and 116b, or the 
former 19. Prequisite to Astronomy 212b is Astronomy 211a or the consent 
of the instructor. 

311a GENERAL RELATIVITY AND HIGH ENERGY ASTROPHYSICS 

Mr. Green 
The tensor calculus is developed and applied to a discussion of general 
relativity and certain current variants. The observational and experimental 
evidence is reviewed. Problems of high energy astrophysics, particularly 
gravitational radiation and gravitational collapse, are considered. Prerequi- 
site: Mathematics 113a and 114b, or 119a, and Physics 115a and 116b or 
the former 19. 
Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

320b COSMOLOGY Mr. Partridge 

Various theoretical models for the origin and evolution of the universe, in- 
cluding the "Big Bang" and "Steady State" models, are discussed. The 
relevant observational evidence is then reviewed. The course ends with an 
attempt to construct a unified picture of the evolution of the universe and 
some of the systems within it. Prerequisite: Mathematics 113a and 114b, 
or 119a, and Physics 115a and 116b, or the former 19. 
Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

340b RADIO ASTRONOMY Mr. Partridge 

The course provides an introduction to the basic techniques of radio 
astronomy and to the various mechanisms that give rise to line and con- 

72 



tinuum emission at radio frequencies. In addition, some of the most im- 
portant observational results of radio, infra-red, and other non-optical 
branches of astronomy are presented. Prerequisite: Mathematics 113a and 
114b, or 119a, and the former Physics 19 and 20, or 213a. 
Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

360b PLASMA ASTROPHYSICS Mr. Green 

The principles of plasma physics are developed and applied to such topics 
as the Van Allen belts, solar phenomena, the cosmic ray flux, the alignment 
of the interstellar dust, and interplanetary and interstellar magnetic fields. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 113a and 114b, or 119a, and the former Physics 
19 and 20, or 213a, or the consent of the instructor. 
Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

371a STELLAR STRUCTURE AND EVOLUTION Mr. Green 

The theory of stellar structure is reviev/ed and the problem of stellar evolu- 
tion is discussed on the basis of the theoretical and observational evidence. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 113a and 114b, or 119a, Physics 115a and 116b, 
or the former 19. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

380b NUCLEAR ASTROPHYSICS Mr. Green 

A discussion is given of the nuclear reactions leading to stellar energy gen- 
eration, to the origin and abundance of the elements in various types of 
astronomical objects, and to the catastrophic stages of stellar evolution. The 
nuclear species in the cosmic rays and nuclear age determinations are con- 
sidered. Prerequisite: Physics 115a and 116b, or the former 19, and 
Astronomy 212b (or concurrently), or the consent of the instructor. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

391a, 392b SPECIAL TOPICS IN ASTROPHYSICS 

Messrs. Green and Partridge 
The content of this course may vary from year to year. It may be repeated 
for credit. Prerequisite: considerable maturity in mathematics, physics and 
astronomy. 
Not offered in 1970-71 

480 INDEPENDENT STUDY Messrs. Green and Partridge 

An example of the content of this course is the determination of the abund- 
ance of the elements in stellar atmospheres based on high dispersion spectra 
obtained at one of the major American observatories. Other examples of 
course content are optical and microwave observations relating to cosmo- 
logical problems. Prerequisite: the consent of the instructor. 



73 



BIOLOGY 

Professor Melvin Santer, Chairman 

Professor Irving Finger*** 

Professor Ariel G. Loewy 

Associate Professor Dietrich Kessler 

Assistant Professor Vivianne T. NACHMiAsf 

Assistant Professor Michael Showe 
Laboratory Instructor Louise G. Onorato 

The biology program is designed to give a solid foundation in general 
biological principles, an insight into recent developments of experi- 
mental aspects of the field, and an opportunity for a research experi- 
ence in the senior year. Special emphasis is placed on molecular and 
cell biology. The reading tutorials are designed primarily for students 
not intending to major in biology. 

The prospective biology major normally takes no biology in his 
freshman year, but instead prepares himself for work in biology by 
taking chemistry and perhaps mathematics or physics. 

Students with a strong high school background in chemistry may, 
with permission of the department, take Biology 100 in their freshman 
year. 

The courses designed for the major program are built up in a series 
of three stages: 

(1) One full-year sophomore course (100), which introduces the 
student to cellular, microbial, and developmental biology. 

(2) Five advanced courses and laboratories numbered in the 200's 
to be taken at the junior or senior level, designed to create 
sufficient competence for research in the senior year. 

(3) Senior Research Tutorials taken for single or double credit 
(chosen from 300, 301, 302, 303, 304) involving reading of 
current literature, laboratory research, student lectures and 
seminars, and a senior thesis. The topics of these research 
tutorials lie in the areas of principal interest of the instructors. 
Senior Research Tutorials may be started with the consent of the 



= *On sabbatical leave, 1970-71. 
tAppointed on the Sloan Foundation Grant. 



74 



d 



instructor during the junior year. A student has the opportunity ni 

to apply for a summer research stipend which enables him to — 

begin his research in the summer following his sophomore or Q 

junior year. Qualified chemistry or physics majors may be ad- p 

mitted to the Senior Research Tutorials with consent of the Q 

instructor. m 

(4) Biology 399c, a senior seminar taken at half intensity for both ,/ 
semesters. It consists of student papers and discussions, faculty 
presentation of research problems, and the year's Philips 
program. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

Biology 100; four courses, at least two of which are selected from Biology 
200a, 201b, 202b, 203 b, and 204a, the other two selected from Chemistry 202a, 
307d, 307e, 305d, 305e, 306b, and 356b, Biology courses at Bryn Mawr num- 
bered 201a or higher, and Biology courses at Swarthmore numbered 25 or 
higher; one year-sequence of Biology courses in the 300's; Chemistry 101a or 
107a, and 108b and 203b; Biology 399c. Majors desiring to take courses at 
Bryn Mawr or Swarthmore must first consult with the chairman of the Haver- 
ford Department. In addition, all majors, regardless of the number of Biology 
200-series courses taken, must enroll in two junior-level laboratory courses. 
Where prerequisites are required for these courses, the student must achieve a 
grade of at least 70 unless otherwise stated, or receive the consent of the in- 
structor to apply them as prerequisites. 

The Department strongly recommends the following additional courses, since 
they provide a minimum theoretical background for advanced work in biology: 
Mathematics 113a and 114b, or 119a and 220b; Physics 113a and 114b, or 115a 
and 116b. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

Since all biology majors participate in the departmental senior research pro- 
gram, they are all candidates for Departmental Honors. These are awarded upon 
consideration of the following criteria of achievement: (a) grade average in 
courses, (b) senior research and thesis, (c) performance in Biology 399c. 



GENERAL COURSES INTENDED PRIMARILY FOR NON-BIOLOGY MAJORS 

001b READING TUTORIAL: TOPICS IN MODERN BIOLOGY I Mr. Showe 
The development of current concepts of the nature of living organisms and 
methods of investigating it, from Aristotle through Harvey, Pasteur, and 
Schrodinger to Watson and Crick, with particular emphasis on 20th century 
discoveries and ideas. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

002a READING TUTORIAL: TOPICS IN MODERN BIOLOGY II 

Mr. Kessler 
The theory of evolution and the relationship of this theory to studies of 

75 



I 



social behavior in animals will be the topic for 1970-71. A reading list of 
original works in the discipline and a study guide will be distributed at the 
beginning of the semester. The student will be asked to write papers care- 
fully analyzing the material. The relevance of the readings to the study of 
man's social behavior will be considered. Students will meet periodically in 
tutorial sessions with the instructor to discuss student papers and go over 
study guides. A film series on animal behavior will be included as part of 
the course. No prerequisites. 

003b READING TUTORIAL: TOPICS IN MODERN BIOLOGY III 

Mr. Santer 
An examination of selected topics in biology of potential interest to those 
whose major interest lies outside the science division. Topics to be discussed 
will be announced prior to registration. 

004a READING TUTORIAL: TOPICS IN MODERN BIOLOGY IV 

Mr. Finger 
An examination of selected topics in biology of potential interest to those 
whose major interest lies outside the science division. Topics to be discussed 
will be announced prior to registration. 
Not offered in 1970-71. 

005b READING TUTORIAL: TOPICS IN MODERN BIOLOGY V 

Mr. Loewy 
An integrated approach to human biological and social evolution. Readings 
in philosophy of science, theories of evolution, the fossil and archeological 
record of man, primitive human societies, contemporary problems in human 
ecology and the future of man. 
Not offered in 1970-71. 

006b READING COURSE IN EVOLUTIONARY THEORY Mr. Finger 

The purpose of this course is to enable the student to acquaint himself with 
evolutionary theory, both current and past, by reading advanced textbooks, 
reviews, and scientific journals. Prerequisite: Biology 100 or consent of the 
instructor. 
Not offered in 1970-71. 



COURSES INTENDED PRIMARLY FOR STUDENTS 
WITH PREREQUISITES IN CHEMISTRY 

100 CELL STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION Staff 

Four hours; three lectures and one laboratory period 

An introductory course in cell biology which combines the areas of cytology, 
biochemistry, biophysics, genetics, microbiology, and some developmental 
biology. The purpose of this course is to integrate these diverse approaches 
into a unified view of cell structure and function. This is a sophomore 
course, although freshmen with adequate preparation in chemistry may 
qualify with consent of the instructor. Students who wish to postpone the 



76 



A 



course to the junior year should obtain permission of the instructor at the 
end of their freshman year. Prerequisite: Chemistry 101a or 107a or consent 
of the instructor. 

200a CELL BIOLOGY l: METABOLIC BIOCHEMISTRY AND 

BIOSYNTHESIS OF MICROMOLECULES Mr. Santer 

A study of the various pathways of carbohydrate metabolism and of meta- 
bolic processes leading to ATP synthesis. The biosynthesis of amino acids 
and nucleotides, DNA, RNA, and proteins. Prerequisite: Biology 100. 

201b CELL BIOLOGY II: STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF PROTEINS 
AND NUCLEIC ACIDS Mr. Loewy 

A study of the structure and properties of proteins and nucleic acids. The 
course will include an analysis of mechano-chemical phenomena in terms of 
the properties of interacting protein molecules. 

202b CELL BIOLOGY III: CYTOLOGY AND DIFFERENTIATION 

Mr. Kessler 

A study of intracellular structure and function emphasizing morphological 
and biochemical methods. Pertinent problems in cell differentiation are con- 
sidered. Seminars are organized around discussions of original journal ar- 
ticles. Laboratory projects provide an introduction to cytochemistry with the 
light and electron microscopes. Prerequisite: Biology 100. 

203b CELL BIOLOGY IV: HEREDITY AND REGULATION Mr. Finger 

The topics to be emphasized are the structure and mutability of genes, trans- 
mission and storage of genetic information, and the translation of this 
information into specific macromolecules. Cytoplasmic control of gene ex- 
pression and other mechanisms for the regulation of gene activity also will 
be discussed. Prerequisite: Biology 100 or consent of the instructor. 
Not offered in 1970-71. 

204a CELL BIOLOGY V: CELLULAR CONTROL MECHANISMS 

Mr. Showe 

This course will be a detailed study, based on a reading of original litera- 
ture, of the means by which cells regulate their synthetic and metabolic pro- 
cesses, including: control of synthesis of small molecules (amino acids and 
nucleotides) and of catabolic pathways, and the integration of cell functions. 
Topics to be discussed will include regulation of enzyme activity, induction 
and repression of enzyme synthesis, and regulation of the synthesis of pro- 
teins and nucleic acids. Emphasis will be on studies performed using micro- 
organism-bacteria, fungi, and bacteria viruses. Prerequisite: Biology 100. 

200f LABORATORY IN METABOLIC BIOCHEMISTRY Mr. Santer 

One period per week, one half-credit. 

The purpose of this laboratory is to gain experience in a variety of bio- 
chemical techniques. One major project will be the isolation of transfer 

77 



RNA, chromosomes and enzymes necessary for synthesis of proteins in vivo 
and reutihzation of these to study aspects of protein synthesis in vitro. 

20 li LABORATORY IN MECHANO-CHEMICAL PHENOMENA 

One laboratory period per week, one half-credit. Mr. Loewy 

The purpose of this laboratory is to apply the techniques of protein chem- 
istry and enzymology to the understanding of mechano-chemical phenomena 
such as protoplasmic streaming and muscle contraction. 

202i LABORATORY IN MICROSCOPIC TECHNIQUES 

Mr. Kessler and Mrs. Nachmias 
One laboratory period per week, one half-credit. 

Students will carry out a project which permits the use of the electron 
microscope and associated techniques such as negative staining and photo- 
graphic developing and printing. Some light microscope technique may also 
be included. The project will involve the isolation of actin and myosin from 
rabbit muscle and subsequent examination of their ultrastructure. 

203i LABORATORY IN IMMUNOCHEMISTRY Mr. Finger 

One laboratory period per week, one half-credit. 

The purpose of this laboratory is to gain experience in the application of 
immunological techniques to the separation and characterization of macro- 
molecules. An immunochemical analysis of serum components will be carried 
out with gel diffusion techniques. Fractions purified by column chromato- 
graphy and salting-out will be characterized by electrophoresis and two 
dimensional diffusion in tubes and slides. Students will also immunize and 
bleed rabbits. 
Not offered in 1970-71. 

204f LABORATORY IN BACTERIAL VIROLOGY Mr. Showe 

One laboratory period per week, one half-credit. 

The life cycle of bacterial viruses will be examined in detail, with emphasis 
on the use of the bacteriophage-infected cell as a model system for exam- 
ining basic life processes at the molecular level. Topics will include synthesis 
of macromolecules, regulation of gene expression, the effects of mutation, 
and the control of virus assembly. Techniques used will include electron 
microscopy, acrylamide gel electrophoresis and the use of radioisotopes as 
tracers. 

300 SENIOR RESEARCH TUTORIAL IN MECHANO-CHEMICAL 

PHENOMENA Mr. Loewy 

Student research in the molecular basis of mechano-chemical phenomena. 
Techniques for structural analysis of covalent protein-protein interactions 
are used. Laboratory work is supplemented with readings related to the area 
of investigation and with the presentation of discussions by students. Pre- 
requisite: Biology 201b or consent of the instructor. 

78 



301 SENIOR RESEARCH TUTORIAL IN CELL BIOCHEMISTRY 

Mr. Santer 

Student research on the chemical composition and hereditary control of 
cytoplasmic particles involved in protein synthesis. Laboratory work is 
supplemented with readings from the current literature, and seminars by 
students on material related to the research. Prerequisite: Biology 301b or 
200a or consent of the instructor. 

302 SENIOR RESEARCH TUTORIAL IN PHYSIOLOGICAL GENETICS 

Mr. Finger 

The major problem to be studied is the regulation of gene activity. Pre- 
requisite: consent of the instructor. 
Not offered in 1970-71. 

303 SENIOR RESEARCH TUTORIAL IN EXPERIMENTAL CYTOLOGY 

Mr. Kessler 

Studies on the localization and structure of actin-like proteins from various 
cell types. Ultra-structural studies will be undertaken by electron micro- 
scopy. Various immunological methods will be employed. Prerequisite: 
Biology 202b or consent of the instructor. 

304 SENIOR RESEARCH TUTORIAL IN MOLECULAR MORPHO- 
GENESIS Mr. Showe 

Studies on the synthesis of multimolecular structures in cells are carried out 
using biochemical and genetic techniques. The systems currently being used 
are the electron transport chair of Escherichia coli, and bacteriophage T4. 
Students should be prepared to develop independent approaches to experi- 
mental problems. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

480 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

399c SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES Staff 

A senior seminar which meets one evening each week consisting of: 

(a) Presentation for discussion of research plans and research results 
by students and faculty. 

(b) Participation in the Department's Philips visitors program. 

(c) Presentation by students of papers on contemporary developments 
in experimental biology, providing an opportunity for library re- 
search and for the writing of a paper. 

(d) A written, open-book comprehensive examination testing the stu- 
dent's ability to synthesize and analyze the material in course work. 

Students should register for Biology 399c in both the fall and spring terms, 
since the work of the course will be distributed through two semesters. 
Course credit is given, however, only for the second semester. 

79 



CHEMISTRY 



^On sabbatical leave, 1970-71. 
■=0n leave of absence, 1970-71. 



n 

z 

m 



Professor Colin F. MacKay, Chairman 
Professor William E. Cadbury**** 

Professor John P. Chesick*** ^ 

Professor Harmon C. Dunathan*** ■- 

Associate Professor Robert M. Gavin, Jr. CD 

Associate Professor Claude Wintner H 

Assistant Professor Steven S. Hecht J^ 

Assistant Professor Geoffrey Martin i^ 

The program in chemistry is designed to meet the needs of students 
who are pursuing chemistry for any of a variety of reasons. Introductory 
courses in the Department provide a broad introduction to the science of 
chemistry as one of the liberal arts. Intermediate and advanced courses 
provide sound preparation for a wide range of professional activities in 
the physical, biological, and medical sciences. At all levels extensive 
use is made of the wide range of instruments available for student use. 
(See section of catalog on "Facilities".) 

The major program in chemistry recognizes that chemistry as a 
discipline occupies the broad area between physics and biology and has 
strong ties to both. Indeed, some of the most exciting areas in science 
today are found in the interdisciplinary fields of chemical physics and 
chemical biology. The department major allows the student maximum 
flexibility in designing a program which can be directed either toward 
one of these interdisciplinary areas or toward one of the more tradi- 
tional areas of chemistry. This flexibility is apparent in the major 
requirements, which accept on an equal basis advanced courses in 
biology, chemistry, or physics. 

This flexibility allows the major adviser and each student in con- 
sultation to plan a program which takes into account that student's 
interests and career aims. Students who are interested in graduate study 
in any of the three areas of departmental emphasis are strongly urged 
to go beyond the eight course program which constitutes the college 
major. Some typical programs which prepare for graduate study are 
given below: 

Chemistry: Chemistry 107a, 108b, 202a, 203b, 301a, 302b, 307d, 307e, 
306b, 309ci, 309e, 355a, or 356b; Physics 113a, 114b; Mathematics 113a, 
114b, or 119a. Russian or German language study is strongly advised. 



81 



Chemical Physics: Chemistry 107a, 108b, 202a, 203b, 301a, 304b, 306b; 
the former Physics 25 or the equivalent, and two advanced courses in either 
Physics or Physical Chemistry; Mathematics 113a, 114b, 220b, and 221a. 

Chemical Biology: Chemistry 107a, 108b, 202a, 203b, 301a, 356b; Biology 
100, 201b, 200a; Physics 113a, 114b; Mathematics 113a, 114b. 

Pre-Medical Students: See the section of the catalog on preparation for 
professions. The usual requirement of four courses in Chemistry may be 
met by enrolling in Chemistry 107a, 108b, 202a, 203b. 

All Students taking their first course in the Department are required 
to take a placement examination given during freshman week. This 
examination, the results of advanced-placement tests, and school records 
will form the basis for placement in Chemistry. Students who are inter- 
ested in the mathematically-based areas of chemistry may want to con- 
sider taking Physics 113a and Chemistry 202a as freshmen. 

In addition to the course program, opportunities are offered for pur- 
suit of laboratory research problems under faculty direction. These are 
described under Research Tutorials below. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

The following major requirements are applicable for the Class of 1973 and 
later. Requirements for the classes of 1971 and 1972 will be worked out in 
consultation with the Chemistry Department. 

Chemistry 107a, 108b, 202b, 301a; Mathematics 113a, 114b (or 119a); Physics 
113a or the former Physics 19; plus four advanced courses in Chemistry, Biology, 
or Physics. One of these advanced courses must be in the area of organic chemistry 
or biology and one must be in the area of physics or physical chemistry. Biology 
courses numbered 200 or above and Physics courses numbered 200 or above are 
defined as advanced courses. Reading courses and courses designed for non- 
scientists do not meet this requirement. Any requirement may be met by taking 
a course of equivalent level at Bryn Mawr. 

It is advised that Physics 113a be completed by the middle of the sophomore 
year, to provide maximum flexibility in course planning during the junior and 
senior years. 

A student must earn a grade of at least 70 in those courses listed as prerequi- 
site to an advanced course in order to qualify for admission to the advanced 
course. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

Students who are considered qualified will be invited to become candidates 
for Departmental Honors during the second semester of the junior year. Honors 
candidates will be expected to do superior work in major courses and to complete 
a senior research problem at a level superior both in quality and quantity of 
effort to that expected in normal course work. Research work extending through 
two semesters is usually expected of a candidate for Departmental Honors. A 
final paper and oral presentation of the work will be expected. 

82 



I Ola ATOMS AND MOLECULES IN ISOLATION AND IN INTERACTION 

Three lectures; no laboratory Mr. Hecht 

Basic concepts of importance in the field of chemistry are developed. Both 
individual and bulk properties of atoms and molecules are considered, thus 
establishing a basis for an appreciation of the significance of chemical reac- 
tivity in a variety of situations. Open to students with no previous training 
in science. 

107a THE CHEMISTRY OF THE LIGHT ELEMENTS I 

Messrs. Gavin and MacKay 
Four hours; three lectures and one laboratory 

The molecular architecture, bond properties, and energetics of the com- 
pounds of elements from hydrogen to chlorine are examined and used to 
develop a unified analysis of their modes of chemical reactivity. Prerequisite: 
previous chemistry and assignment by the Department. 

108b THE CHEMISTRY OF THE LIGHT ELEMENTS II Mr. Wintner 

Four hours; three lectures and one laboratory 

This course is an introduction to the chemistry of carbon, or organic chem- 
istry. The properties of the common organic functional groups and the basic 
mechanistic concepts of organic chemistry are discussed. These properties 
are viewed within the context of the chemistry of the other light elements as 
developed in Chemistry 107a. Prerequisite: Chemistry 107a or consent of 
the instructor. 

202b BASIC PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY Mr. MacKay 

Four hours; three lectures and one laboratory period 

A course designed to acquaint the student with basic areas of physical 
chemistry and to serve as the gateway to the area-oriented physical chemistry 
courses in the curriculum. Particular emphasis will be placed on solution 
thermodynamics and equilibria. Other topics include electrochemistry, col- 
ligative and phase properties, and chemical kinetics. Laboratory exercises 
will consist of the quantitative study of systems illustrating principles de- 
veloped in the lectures. Prerequisite: Physics 113a or the former Physics 19 
and Mathematics 113a or 119a. 

203a TOPICS IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY Mr. Wintner 

Four hours; three lectures and one laboratory period 

Topics in stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms, biochemistry, and natural- 
products chemistry will build on the fundamentals developed in Chemistry 
107a, 108b. Prerequisite: Chemistry 108b. 

208b TOPICS IN CHEMICAL SCIENCE Messrs. MacKay and Gavin 

An examination of selected topics in chemistry of potential interest to those 
whose major interests lie outside the science division. Topics to be discussed 
will be announced prior to registration. No prerequisite. Not open to stu- 
dents who have taken chemisti^y, biology, or physics courses numbered 113a 
or higher. 
Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

83 



301a, 302b LABORATORY IN CHEMICAL STRUCTURE AND 

REACTIVITY Messrs. Hecht and Martin 

Two laboratory periods 

This course integrates inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry concepts in 
a broad laboratory study of structure and its relationship to chemical reac- 
tivity. A variety of spectroscopic methods are introduced as structural and 
analytical tools. Chemical kinetics, isotopic labeling, chromatography, and 
other physical methods are used in studies of reactions of inorganic and or- 
ganic compounds. These include photochemical and enzyme-catalyzed reac- 
tions. The experiments are "open-ended" and students are encouraged to 
design their own approach to the questions investigated. Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 108b and Chemistry 202b. 

303a,b QUANTUM MECHANICS AND SPECTROSCOPY Mr. Zimmerman 

Offered at Bryn Mawr College. 

304b ADVANCED PHYSICAL AND INSTRUMENTAL METHODS 

LABORATORY Staff 

One lecture and two laboratory periods 

Laboratory study of the applications of spectroscopic, X-ray, and other 
methods to the determination of molecular structure, and of the reactive and 
nonreactive interactions of molecules and ions. Prerequisites: Chemistry 
202b and 306b which may be taken concurrently. 

305d PRINCIPLES OF CHEMICAL KINETICS Mr. MacKay 

Emphasis will be placed on microscopic properties and their significance for 
kinetics; on mechanism, and on models. Prerequisite: Chemistry 202b or 
the former Physics 19. 
A half -course offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

305e TOPICS IN PHYSICAL AND INORGANIC CHEMISTRY Staff 

Variable content depending on interests of students and faculty. Topic for 
1970-71: The Chemistry of the Transition Metals. Prerequisite: Chemistry 
107a and 202b or Chemistry 107a and the former Physics 19. 
A half-course offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

306b QUANTUM CHEMISTRY Mr. Gavin 

An introduction to quantum mechanics, with applications to problems in 
chemical bonding and molecular spectroscopy and structure. The computer 
is used in illustrative problem work. Prerequisite: Chemistry 202b or the 
former Physics 19. 

307d CLASSICAL CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS Mr. Chesick 

Emphasis is placed on a careful examination of the concepts central to 
thermodynamics, and on the internal structure and logic of the subject. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 202b or the former Physics 19. 
A half-course offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

84 



ll 



307e INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICAL MECHANICS Mr. Chesick 

The foundations of the subject in mechanics and probability theory are 
discussed. From these foundations the thermodynamic functions are de- 
veloped in a form which allows their computation from molecular properties. 
Emphasis is on the properties of gases. Prerequisite: Chemistry 202b or the 
former Physics 19. 
A half-course offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

309d,e TOPICS IN PHYSICAL AND INORGANIC CHEMISTRY Staff 

Variable content depending on interests of students and faculty involved. 
Topics for 1970-71: 309d, Structure Determination by Scattering Methods; 
309e, Group Theory and Its Applications to Chemistry. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 202b or Physics 115a. 
Two half-courses offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

355a ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY Messrs. Hecht and Wintner 

Selected topics from the fields of stereochemistry and organic reaction 
mechanisms. Prerequisite: Chemistry 203a. 

356b BIOCHEMICAL MECHANISMS Mr. Dunathan 

The organic chemistry of proteins, polypeptides, and polynucleotides. The 
theory and mechanism of enzyme action. Selected biological problems of 
chemical interest. Prerequisite: Chemistry 203a. 
Not offered in 1970-71. 

Research Tutorials 

Students with solid preparation in the Department's course work and a 
strong desire to do independent laboratory work may register for a research 
tutorial in an area of active faculty research. In these tutorials the student 
attempts to define and solve a research problem under the close supervision 
of a faculty member. 

361a, 362b RESEARCH TUTORIAL IN PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 

Messrs. Chesick, Gavin, MacKay, and Martin 

Directed research in problems of molecular structure determination, 
quantum chemistry, hot-atom chemistry, gas-phase reaction kinetics and 
photochemistry, or one of a selected group of topics in inorganic chemistry. 

363a, 364b RESEARCH TUTORIAL IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

Messrs. Dunathan, Hecht, and Wintner 

Directed research in areas of physical-organic chemistry and biochemistry. 
Topics include studies of the mechanism of action of enzymes, utilizing 
pyridoxal phosphate as a cofactor, and problems in free radical chemistry. 



85 



CLASSICS Q 

Associate Professor Daniel J. Gillis, Chaiiman W 

Associate Professor Joseph R. Russo «! 

Assistant Professor Diskin Clay 55 

(D 

The Classics Department offers instruction in the language, litera- q 
ture, and civilization of the Greek and Roman peoples. Principal em- m 
phasis is laid upon meeting the Greek and Roman legacy through the *" 
medium of the original languages, but courses in Classical Civilization 
offer opportunities to study ancient history and literature in English 
translation. 

Two major programs offer students an opportunity either to specialize 
in the ancient world or to follow the Classical Tradition into its later 
manifestations. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

Two major programs are available in this Department: 

A. Classics Major: ten semester courses divided between Greek and Latin, 
of which two must be from Classics 301a, 302b, 303a, 304b; Classics 490b; 
a written examination in translation from Greek and Latin, to be taken at a 
time set by the Department, ordinarily not later than the second week of the 
second semester of the senior year. If a candidate fails this examination the 
Department will decide when he may repeat it. 

B. Classics and the Classical Tradition Major: a specific program, to be 
approved by the Department, involving at least one ancient language and one 
modern field of study, and a substantial paper; eight semester courses in Greek 
or Latin; two semester courses in related fields in other departments; Classics 
490b; a written examination in translation from Greek or Latin. If a candidate 
fails this examination the Department will decide when he may repeat it. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

A. Classics Major: an average of 85 or better in classics courses during the 
junior and senior years; a grade of 85 or better in the translation examinations; 
either a substantial paper written during the senior year and due on or before 
May 1 on a topic approved by the Department, or the completion of 300 pages 
of reading in Greek and Latin during the junior and senior years in addition 
to normal course assignments, the material to be chosen in consultation with 
the Department; a one-hour oral examination on Honors and course work. 

B. Classics and the Classical Tradition Major: Requirements are the same 
as for Honors in Classics except that courses in the related field outside the 
Department are to be counted in computing the grade average; the student will 
not have the option of substituting reading in Latin and Greek for the paper, 
which may be substantial extension of the paper required for the Major; the 
oral examination will cover both ancient and later parts of the candidate's 
special field. 

87 



COURSES IN GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

101a-102b ELEMENTARY GREEK Mr. Clay 

Intensive study of the elements of the language, followed by reading of 
easy Greek prose and poetry. 

201a INTRODUCTION TO GREEK LITERATURE Mr. Russo 

Readings in Homer's Odyssey, with lectures and reports on the Homeric 
world. Prerequisite: Classics 10 la- 102b or the equivalent. 

202b INTRODUCTION TO GREEK LITERATURE Mr. Russo 

Reading of the major Greek poets of the centuries between Homer and 
Aeschylus. Prerequisite: Classics 201a or permission of the instructor. 

30 1 a GREEK LITERATURE OF THE FIFTH CENTURY: POETRY 

Mr. Russo 
Reading of the Oedipus tragedies of Sophocles, plus critical study of his 
other plays in English translation. Prerequisite: Classics 201a or 202b or 
the equivalent. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

302b GREEK LITERATURE IN THE FIFTH CENTURY: PROSE 

Mr. Gillis 
Readings in the Histories of Herodotus and Thucydides, with special atten- 
tion to literary aspects of the works. Prerequisite: Classics 201a or 202b or 
the equivalent. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

303a, 304b GREEK LITERATURE IN THE FOURTH CENTURY: PROSE 

Staff 
Study of Platonic dialogues, as dictated by the needs of the students enrolled. 
Students majoring in Classics will be afforded opportunities to practice Greek 
composition. May be repeated for credit with change of content. Prerequisite: 
Classics 201a or 202b or the equivalent. Classics 304b may be taken without 
303a. 

COURSES IN LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

103a-104b ELEMENTARY LATIN Messrs. GilHs and Russo 

Basic instruction in Latin declension and conjugation; then reading in Latin 
prose and poetry, with special emphasis on Ovid. ^ 

105a LATIN LITERATURE I: PROSE Mr. Gillis 

Review of grammar and vocabulary: reading of five or six major orations 
of Cicero. Prerequisite: Classics 103a-104b or two or three years of prepara- 
tory Latin. 

106b LATIN LITERATURE I: POETRY Mr. Clay 

Readings in the Aeneid of Vergil. Prerequisites: Classics 103a-104b and 
105a or 107a or the equivalent, at the discretion of the instructor. 

88 



107a LATIN LITERATURE II: PROSE Mr. Gillis 

Readings in the Agiicola, Germania and Annales of Tacitus. Prerequisite: 
Classics 105a, 106b, or four years of preparatory Latin. 

108b LATIN LITERATURE II: POETRY Mr. Clay 

Readings in the Augustan poets. 

203a LATIN LITERATURE III: POETRY Mr. Clay 

Readings in the De reriim natura of Lucretius. Prerequisites at the discretion 
of the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit with change of 
content. 

204b LATIN LITERATURE III: PROSE Mr. Gillis 

Studies in the Pro Caelio and De oratore of Cicero. Prerequisites at the 
discretion of the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit with 
change of content. 



COURSES IN CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION NOT REQUIRING THE USE OF 
GREEK OR LATIN 

119a GREEK CIVILIZATION Mr. Luman 

(Also called History 119a and Religion 119a; for course description see 
History 119a.) 

120b ROMAN CIVILIZATION Mr. Luman 

(Also called History 120b and Religion 120b; for course description see 
History 120 b.) 

208b SEMINAR IN CLASSICAL LITERATURE: "ODYSSEUS AND 

ULYSSES" Mr. Russo 

A close reading of Homer's Odyssey and James Joyce's Ulysses, in the hope 
of answering such questions as: 

1 ) To what extent does Joyce seem inspired by Homer's poem and in 
what ways is his book like or unlike the Odyssey'} 

2) What is a novel, what is an epic, and which has Joyce written? 

3) How does each author make language the artist's special tool for 
expressing his view of the world man lives in^ and an instrument for 
relating himself to his tradition and at the same time going beyond it? 

No prerequisites. Limited to twelve non-Freshman. Given annually with 
change of topic. May be repeated for credit. 

480 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

Prerequisites at the discretion of the instructor. 

490b SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES Staff 

89 



ECONOMICS 

Professor Holland Hunter, Chairman 

President John R. Coleman 

Assistant Professor Samuel Gubins 

Lecturer Helen M. Hunter 

At Bryn Mawr 

Professor Joshua C. Hubbard, Acting Chairman 

Associate Professor Richard B. DuBoff 

Lecturer Susan Wachter 

The work in economics provides a basis for understanding and 
evaluating the operation of the American economy and other types of 
economy. Concepts and analytic methods are presented as aids in 
formation of intelligent policy judgments. The introductory course, 
Economics 101a,b (a one-semester course offered each semester) is 
designed to give the kind of informed perspective on economic per- 
formance standards that should be part of a liberal education. The 
group of intermediate courses offers a fuller range of material on major 
topics in the field, designed to be useful to non-majors as well as 
majors. The group of advanced courses supplies a theoretical and 
methodological foundation for those who either expect to major in 
economics or to make use of economics in their professional careers. 
Majors are encouraged to take these courses in their sophomore or 
junior years, where practicable. In all courses students are exposed to 
the data and primary source material that underlie sound economic 
analysis, and are encouraged to apply oral, written, and computer 
methods in analyzing this evidence. 

Students planning a career in economics, business, and management 
will find various economics courses useful as introductions to the 
mathematical methods and theoretical models that are now part of 
advanced professional training. In addition, it is recommended that 
students with these career interests include calculus, probability and 
statistics, and linear algebra in their course work. 

The major research which is a requirement of the major may be 
carried out during the second half of the junior year or during the 
senior year as part of a research seminar or as work performed in 
Economics 480, 481. 

90 



MAJOR REQUIREMENTS ^ 

Economics 101a,b, 301a; two semester courses from 303a, 304b, 305b; three f| 

other semester courses, one of which is a reasonable course taken during the « 

spring of the junior year or during the senior year; and three other approved *» 

courses in the social sciences or mathematics. The comprehensive examination 2 

involves a required written examination and, at the student's option, an oral a 

examination. W 

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS ^ 

Plans for Honors work will usually be laid during a student's junior year. An 1 1 
Honors project will involve a paper of high quality, usually begun in a research f|| 
seminar, together with an oral examination. 

101a,b INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS Staff 

Study of the institutions and principles of the American economy, with 
stress on the forces promoting stable growth with minimum inflation and 
unemployment. Analysis of the relationships that determine individual in- 
comes and prices, the issues that arise in international economic affairs, and 
the problems of poverty at home and abroad. Diverse readings, class dis- 
cussion, papers. 

201a ECONOMIC HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT Mr. DuBoff 

Long-term trends in output, resources, technology; structure of consumption, 
production, distribution; foreign trade and finance; basic causes of economic 
growth and underdevelopment; the role of the state. Quantitative findings 
provide the points of departure. Prerequisite: Economics 101a, b. 

202a LATIN AMERICAN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Mrs. Wachter 

A theoretical and empirical analysis in an historical setting of the factors 
which have led to the economic underdevelopment of Latin America. The 
interrelationship between political and social change and economic growth. 

204b THE MODERN CORPORATION Mr. Coleman 

Study of selected issues in the role of the corporation in the economy and 
society: pressures in decision-making, relations with government and labor, 
response to new social concerns, and development of leadership. 

205b PRIVATE ENTERPRISE AND PUBLIC POLICY Mrs. Wachter 

A theoretical and empirical analysis of the behavior of business firms and 
the structure of industrial markets in the U.S. economy; evaluation of the 
performance of these markets; social and political implications of public 
regulation of private enterprises. Prerequisite: Economics 101a, b. 

206b INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC THEORY AND POLICY 

Current problems in international trade; the theory of trade; the balance of 
payments and the theory of disturbances and adjustment in the international 
economy; economic integration; the impact of growth in rich and poor 
countries on the development of the world economy. Prerequisite; Eco- 
nomics 101a, b. 
Offered in 1971-72. 

91 



207a MONEY AND BANKING Mr. Hubbard 

The development and present organization of the money and banking system 
of the United States; domestic and international problems of monetary 
theory and policy. Prerequisite: Economics 101a, b. 

208b PUBLIC FINANCE AND FISCAL POLICY Mr. Hubbard 

A study of local, state, and Federal revenues and expenditures with particu- 
lar emphasis on the Federal budget; fiscal policy as a positive means of 
shaping public taxation and expenditure so as to contribute to a stable, 
full-employment economy. Prerequisite: Economics 101a, b. 

209a ECONOMICS OF URBAN POVERTY Mr. Gubins 

Study of economic aspects of urban poverty problems, investment in human 
resources, financing of urban sei^vices, relations between income and earn- 
ings; theoretical and empirical analysis of benefits and costs of poverty 
programs. Prerequisite: Economics 101a, b. 

210a THE SOVIET SYSTEM Mr. Hunter 

(Also called Political Science 210a) 

An analysis of the structure and functioning of major Soviet economic, 
political, and social institutions. Current arrangements are studied as prod- 
ucts of historical development. Present performance and prospects are 
evaluated. Prerequisite: two semester courses of economics, political science, 
or history. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

212b POLITICAL ECONOMY Mr. DuBoff 

An analysis of contemporary capitalism as a socio-economic system. Free 
market, Keynesian, Marxist and Socialist theories are appraised. Readings 
may include Marx, Baran, Sweezy, Galbraith, Friedman and others. Prereq- 
uisite: Economics 101a, b. 

214b ECONOMICS OF MINORITIES 

An examination of economic and social indicators relating to national and 
local conditions; specific studies of labor and housing markets in the Black, 
Appalachian and American Indian communities. Theories of racial dis- 
crimination and poverty. Prerequisite: Economics 101a, b. 
Offered in 1971-72. 

216b WESTERN EUROPEAN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Mr. DuBoff 
Selected topics in the economic history of Britain, France, Germany, and 
Italy since 1760 are examined, both theoretically and empirically. Represent- 
ative topics may include the "industrial revolution," technological change, 
demographic trends, the growth of international trade and finance, the 
impacts of the world wars, and the effects of national economic policies. 
Prerequisite: Economics 101a, b. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

218b SEMINAR IN LABOR RESOURCES Mr. Coleman 

Selected issues in the functioning of labor markets and the development of 
human resources. Illustrative topics: frictions in labor markets from un- 
skilled through professionals, ideology in contrasting work groups, rise and 



92 



I 



status of labor unionism, public policy on collective bargaining, investment 
in education and training. Prerequisite: Economics 101a, b. 

300b RESEARCH SEMINAR ON HUMAN RESOURCES, 

POVERTY, AND URBAN ECONOMICS Mr. Gubins 

Students will engage in independent, empirical research on manpovi'er de- 
velopment, poverty, and urban problems of the Philadelphia region. Pre- 
requisite: Economics 209a or permission of the instructor. 

301a STATISTICAL METHODS IN ECONOMICS Mrs. Hunter 

An introduction to the concepts and procedures that underlie the quantitative 
analysis of economic and other social data. Frequency distributions, proba- 
bility and sampling, time series, index numbers, regression analysis, com- 
puter programming. Prerequisite: Economics 101a, b. 

302b INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRICS Mrs. Hunter 

Quantitative methods of economic analysis and forecasting are presented in 
class and then used by students in individual projects. Multiple regression 
analysis, econometric m.odels, economic forecasting, use of maximization 
and input-output methods. Prerequisite: Economics 301a or permission of 
the instructor. 

303 a MACROECONOMIC ANALYSIS Mr. Gubins 

Rigorous review of the theoretical foundations of income determination, 
monetary phenomena, and fluctuations in price level and employment. In- 
troduction to dynamic processes. Prerequisite: Economics 101a, b. 

304b MICROECONOMIC ANALYSIS Mr. Gubins 

Systematic investigation of analytic relationships underlying consumer wel- 
fare, efficient resource allocation, ideal pricing, and the distribution of in- 
come. Half of the course is devoted to the application of microeconomic 
theory to current problems. Prerequisite: Economics 101a, b. 

305b DEVELOPMENT ANALYSIS Mr. Hunter 

Theoretical treatment of the structural changes associated with the process 
of economic development, especially in poor countries, and rigorous analysis 
of criteria for policy judgments in development programming. Introduction 
to input-output and linear programming methods. Prerequisite: Economics 
101a, b. 

307b RESEARCH SEMINAR ON COMMUNIST DEVELOPMENT 

Mr. Hunter 
Students will investigate past or prospective development processes in the 
USSR, Eastern Europe, or China, selecting a conceptual or empirical prob- 
lem and applying social sciences analytic methods. Prerequisite: Economics/ 
Political Science 210a or permission of the instructor. 

311a RESEARCH SEMINAR ON INTERNATIONAL TRADE 

Student research will involve constructing measures of recent develop- 
ments between trading nations, testing hypotheses using existing data and 
current statistical techniques, or attempting extensions of international trade 
theory. Prerequisite: Economics 206b or permission of the instructor. 
Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

480, 481 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

93 



ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE [Jl 

2 

Professor Theodore B. Hetzel, Chairman m 

Associate Professor Thomas A. Benham jj" 

The newly revised and expanded program in Engineering and Applied fll 

Science is designed to provide a sound preparation for a career in en- fTI 

gineering or industry by a combination of basic engineering courses jfl 

with a broad range of those in the natural sciences, mathematics, social "• 

sciences, and humanities. 2 



The creative aspects of engineering are emphasized by involving the 
student in development of special engineering projects, one at an ele- 
mentary level in the sophomore year and another at an advanced level 
in the senior year. These laboratory projects in design and construction 
will take into account not only the technical but also the scientific and 
social implications of the project. 

The iatroductory course is divided into two distinct elements. The 
first semester, planned primarily for engineering majors, concentrates 
on engineering design. The second is an introduction to automatic com- 
putation, for students in engineering and in the social and natural 
sciences as well. It will center around problems of numerical methods 
and procedures involving the use of linear algebra, differential and 
integral calculus, and elementary statistics, making extensive use of the 
College's IBM 360 digital computer. 

The courses for the engineering major plus the general College re- 
quirements in the natural and social sciences and the humanities, to- 
gether with several free electives, constitute a program such as is some- 
times called "General Engineering" or "Engineering Administration." 

Haverford graduates with a major in engineering who wish to carry 
on further technical training in engineering are granted advanced stand- 
ing in undergraduate engineering schools or are admitted to graduate 
schools. Those engineering majors who seek employment in leading 
industrial firms have found that their preparation at Haverford has 
prepared them well for engineering employment as well as for future 
study and training. 

Our students profit by opportunities to visit industrial plants and 
attend meetings of technical societies in the Philadelphia area. 

95 







MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

Engineering 210a, 240b, 250a, 260a, 320b, 480 a or b, 490; Mathematics 113a; 
Physics 113a; Economics 101a and 101b; three additional courses above the intro- 
ductory level, from engineering, mathematics, or the natural sciences, chosen in 
consultation with the Engineering Department. 

110a INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN Mr. Hetzel 

One class and two laboratory periods 

Principles and conventions of engineering graphics, including pictorial drawing 
and descriptive geometry; the materials and methods of production; the com- 
ponents of machines and their kinematic analysis. Prerequisite: consent of 
the instructor. 

210a ANALYTICAL MECHANICS Mr. Hetzel 

A study of statics, kinematics, and dynamics; forces in equilibrium, friction, 
moments of inertia, plane motion, work and energy, impulse and momen- 
tum, mechanical vibrations. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

230a MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN ENGINEERING Mr. Benham 

Use of such advanced mathematical techniques as infinite series, transforms, 
Bessel functions, and complex variables. Problems are chosen from various 
fields of engineering. Prerequisites: Mathematics 113a; Physics 113a. 

240b ENGINEERING DESIGN Messrs. Benham and Hetzel 

One class and two laboratory periods 

The group will choose a feasible problem, consider the technical, economic, 
and social aspects; and invent, design, and construct a solution to the problem. 
Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

250a INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING Mr. Benham 

Four hours, including one laboratory period 

Direct and alternating current circuits and machines, transient phenomena. 
Engineering 230a recommended. 

260b INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRONICS Mr. Benham 

Four hours, including one laboratory period 

Electronic devices, magnetic and control circuits, radiation and detection of 
electromagnetic waves, transmission systems. Prerequisite: Engineering 250a. 

220c INTRODUCTION TO AUTOMATIC COMPUTATION Mr. Snyder 

Two lectures and two hours of laboratory throughout the year, for one 
semester-course credit 

Lectures will present basic mathematical material and the fundamentals of 
numerical analysis. Emphasis will be more on over-all viewpoints than on 

96 



particular techniques. The laboratory will consist of computer programming 
with problems drawn as far as possible from the student's major field. Pre- 
requisite: Mathematics 113a or the equivalent. 

Offered at Bryn Mawr as Mathematics 220c. 

320b THERMODYNAMICS Mr. Hetzel 

A study of energy, its sources, liberation, transfer, and utilization; gases, 
vapors, and their mixtures; theoretical and actual thermodynamic cycles for 
power and refrigeration. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

330a MECHANICS OF MATERIALS Mr. Hetzel 

A study of beams, shafts, columns, vessels, and joints, acted upon by simple 
and combined stresses. Prerequisite: Engineering 210a and consent of the 
instructor. 

340b INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES Mr. Hetzel 

The thermodynamics, fluid flow, and performance of internal combustion 
engines; consideration of fuels, carburetion, injection, etc. and several labora- 
tory investigations of engine performance. Prerequisite: Engineering 320b or 
consent of the instructor. 

350a CIRCUIT THEORY Mr. Benham 

Four hours, inchiding one laboratory period 

Networks, resonance, integrating and differentiating systems, and filters. 
Prerequisite: Engineering 250a and 260b (which may be taken concurrently) 
or consent of the instructor. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

360b ADVANCED ELECTRONICS Mr. Benham 

Four hours, including one laboratory period 

Amplifiers, rectifiers, oscillators, pulse-height analyzers. Prerequisite: En- 
gineering 350a or consent of the instructor. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

370a COMMUNICATION THEORY Mr. Benham 

Review of communication systems; study of the theory and problems asso- 
ciated with noise; introduction to information theory. Prerequisite: consent 
of the instructor. 
Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

480a,b INDEPENDENT STUDY Messrs. Benham and Hetzel 

Engineering majors are required to do at least one semester of individual 
work in some special field of investigation, such as the engineering of a 
project with consideration of its technical, industrial, commercial, and 
sociological aspects. 

490 SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES 

97 



ENGLISH III 

Professor Alfred W. Satterthwaite, Chairman ~ 

Professor John A. Lester, Jr. y| 

Professor John Ashmead, Jr.*** P 

Professor Edgar Smith Rose in 

Professor Frank J. Quinn ■. 

Associate Professor Duncan Aswell ^ 
Assistant Professor James C. Ransom*** 
Assistant Professor Richard Lubarsky 
Lecturer Doris S. Quinn 

The Department of English aims to make accessible to students their 
cultural heritage in English and to help them perfect their reading and 
writing skills. These aims are reciprocal. Only if students read well are 
they able to possess their heritage; only if they realize through literature 
the full resources of language will their own writing attain the desired 
level of effectiveness. 

Many students who choose to major in English intend to pursue some 
aspect of the subject professionally: to proceed to graduate school, to 
teach literature, or to undertake a literary career. The program of the 
Department provides preliminary education for all these purposes. The 
study of literature in English is recommended likewise to those students 
who intend to enter a non-literary profession such as law, government 
service, the ministry, medicine, or business. The Department welcomes 
such students. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

A variety of major programs is available in the Department of English, limited 
only by the following provisions: 

The details of each English major's program vi^ill be worked out with a member 
of the English faculty chosen by the student to act as his major adviser. Upon the 
chairman's approval, this program becomes a contract of academic work which 
the student will undertake in his junior and senior years. The contract may be 
revised on consultation with and approval of the student and faculty member 
concerned. 

The program will include one semester of introductory work in the field (101a 
or 101b), English 398b, and at least seven other courses pertinent to advanced 
English studies. As many as two semesters of study of a foreign literature in the 
original language or classical literature in translation will be accepted toward the 
English major. 

Normally the major in English will entail a concentration in English literature 
or in American literature or, in cooperation with appropriate departments, 



***0n sabbatical leave, 1970-71. 

99 



American Studies. Individual contracts with a consistent plan for some study in 
the literary tradition relevant to the student's special interests (including contracts 
in comparative literature) will be given sympathetic consideration. 

The student's attention is called to the range and variety of types of literature 
and literary study which are offered in the English curriculum. In substance there 
are courses which study various literary periods in depth, others which concen- 
trate on a major author or small group of authors, or inquire into a particular 
literary problem or a particular literary genre, or which deal with literary theory 
and criticism, the art of writing, and the art of the film. In procedure, courses 
variously involve lecture-discussion, seminar, project work, or independent read- 
ing. It is expected that the major in English will take advantage of this variety 
in offerings. 

The nature of the English 398b course to be offered will be determined through 
an inquiry (in November of the senior year) which will consider the progress 
achieved by each student in the terms of his individual contract. 

In November of each academic year the English faculty will meet with all 
English majors (and prospective majors) to discuss English Department courses 
proposed for the following year. 

Courses in English taken at Bryn Mawr College (under the terms specified 
earlier in this catalog) may count toward the major. 

The comprehensive examination will be determined individually, in consultation 
with the contract supervisor, with the approval of the Chairman of the 
Department. 

Students who plan to proceed to graduate work are reminded that virtually 
all graduate schools require a reading knowledge of both French and German, 
and some of the leading ones require a knowledge of Latin, also, for the Ph.D. 
degree in English. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

Students whose work shows superior achievement will be invited to become 
Honors candidates at the end of their junior year. Candidates for Honors must 
achieve an overall average of 85 or better in English courses (including 398b) 
completed in their junior and senior years. 

Each Honors candidate must submit a substantial paper which demonstrates 
his ability to handle critically and to present in scholarly fashion an acceptable 
literary subject. This paper must be in the hands of the chairman of the Depart- 
ment not later than May 1st of the student's senior year. To be accepted for 
Honors this paper must, in the judgment of the English faculty, reveal superior 
achievement. 

Honors are awarded on the basis of achievement in courses, an Honors project, 
and the comprehensive examination. High Honors are granted on the further 
evidence of distinction in an oral examination. 

101a,b THE READING OF LITERATURE Staff 

The course provides a disciplined grounding in the skills of appreciation, 
analysis, and interpretation. It will emphasize the close reading of a small 
number of exemplary texts, drama and films as well as poetry and fiction, 
with some secondary readings in theory and criticism. The course will 

100 



incorporate to some extent the tutorial and the stress on writing of the former 
EngHsh 11-12. A one-semester course offered in each semester. Required of 
all English majors, but not a prerequisite for English courses taken by 
non-majors. 

121a GENERAL COURSE IN ENGLISH LITERATURE (I) THE HERO: 
PAST AND PRESENT Mr. Lester 

A consideration, with variations, of the heroic life as seen in the English 
literary heritage; its pattern and meaning, in past and present. 

Not offered in 1971-72. 

nib GENERAL COURSE IN ENGLISH LITERATURE (II) Mr. Lester 

Major figures in English literature from the early eighteenth century to the 
present. 

Not offered in 1970-71. 

133a LITERATURE OF THE ENGLISH RENAISSANCE (I) Mr. Ransom 
A critical study of the literature of the Elizabethan age. 
Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

134b LITERATURE OF THE ENGLISH RENAISSANCE (II) 

Mr. Satterthwaite 

A critical study of the literature of the late Elizabethan period through the 
early Stuart reigns. 

Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

U2a THE ART OF POETRY Mr. Quinn 

The analysis and interpretation of selected poems in terms of tone, image, 
metaphor, diction, prosody, theme, symbol, and myth. Enrollment limited to 
freshmen and sophomores. 

147a LINGUISTICS, RHETORIC, AND LITERATURE Mr. Ashmead 

(See General Courses: Linguistics 147a) 
Not offered in 1970-71. 

221a THE RISE OF THE NOVEL Mr. Rose 

A concentrated study of selected works of fiction from Defoe to Austen, 
employing such concepts as plot, character, setting, theme, style, mimesis, 
and point of view. 

222b THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE NOVEL Mr. Lester 

Narrative fiction from Austen to Joyce. 

101 



233a THE AGE OF MILTON Mr. Rose 

Selected works by Milton in the context of metaphysical poetry, baroque 
prose, and Restoration drama. 

234b THE NEOCLASSICAL MOVEMENT Mr. Satterthwaite 

A study of some of the major works of Swift, Pope, and Johnson. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

245a AMERICAN LITERATURE AND AMERICAN STUDIES BEFORE 
1890 Mr. Ashmead 

An inquiry into the relationships of American literature and American 
culture mainly before 1890, centering on examination of a few related issues, 
forms, or topics, especially as these have relevance today. 

Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

246b AMERICAN LITERATURE AND AMERICAN STUDIES SINCE 1890 

Mr. Ashmead 

An inquiry into the relationships of American literature and American culture 
since 1890, centering on examination of a few related issues, forms, or topics. 

Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

255a SELECTED AMERICAN AUTHORS, ISSUES, AND LITERARY 
THEORIES, MAINLY BEFORE THE CIVIL WAR Mr. Aswell 

An exploration of a few related authors and their works, especially as these 
mark significant and lasting new directions in American literature. 

Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

256b SELECTED AMERICAN AUTHORS, ISSUES, AND LITERARY 
THEORIES, FROM THE CIVIL WAR TO WORLD WAR I Mr. Aswell 

An exploration of a few related authors and their works, especially as these 
mark significant new directions in American literature. The specific topic 
will be announced each year the course is given. 

Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

261a BLACK LITERATURE IN AMERICA Mr. Aswell 

A study of black literary expression in various forms, with emphasis on 
works by W. E. B. DuBois, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, and LeRoi Jones. 
Some peripheral attention to certain white authors (such as Joel Chandler 
Harris and Gertrude Stein), for purposes of drawing specific and pointed 
comparisons. Enrollment limited. 

270b SHAKESPEARE Mrs. Quinn 

Extensive reading in Shakespeare's plays. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

102 



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280b CREATIVE WRITING Mr. Ashmead 

Practice in writing imaginative literature. Chiefly confined to prose fiction. 
Regular assignments, class discussions, and personal conferences. Prerequisite: 
junior standing and consent of the instructor. 
Not offered in 1970-71. 

311a SOUTHERN LETTERS: 1919 TO THE PRESENT Mr. Lubarsky 

An examination of the flowering of Southern American literature after World 
War I, with particular emphasis on William Faulkner, lohn Crowe Ransom, 
Allen Tate, Robert Penn Warren, Thomas Wolfe, Flannery O'Connor, Eudora 
Welty, and John Barth. Enrollment limited. Prerequisite: a prior course in 
English or consent of the instructor. 

333a THE ROMANTIC PERIOD Mr. Ransom 

Critical reading in the literature of the English romantic tradition. Prerequi- 
site: consent of the instructor. Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors. 

Not offered in 1970-71. 

334b THE VICTORIAN PERIOD Mr. Lester 

Readings in the controversial, critical, and imaginative literature of the 
period. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

345a BRITISH LITERATURE OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY 

Mr. Quinn and Mrs. Quinn 

Selected writers in poetry, prose, and drama. Prerequisite: two courses in 
English above the freshman level. Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors. 

346b AMERICAN LITERATURE OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY 

Messrs. Aswell and Lubarsky 

Selected writers in poetry, prose, and drama. Prerequisite: two courses in 
English above the freshman level. Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors. 

351a LITERARY THEORY AND CRITICISM Mr. Rose 

(Also called Philosophy 351a) 

A systematic exploration of various approaches to literature. Reading in 
aesthetics, criticism, and imaginative literature. Discussions and critical 
papers. 

Not offered in 1970-71. 

355a CHAUCER AND THE CHAUCERIANS Mr. Quinn 

A study of the Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, Chaucer's prose, 
and the work of Henryson and Dunbar. Prerequisite: consent of the instruc- 
tor. Enrollment limited. 

103 



361a TOPICS IN SHAKESPEARE Mr. Satterthwaite 

Close study of a few plays. Seminar. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 
Enrollment limited. 

364b TOPICS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE Mr. Rose 

1970-71: T. S. Eliot. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Enrollment 
limited. 

366b TOPICS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE Mr. Lubarsky 

1970-71: American Drama and Film: Modern American drama from Eugene 
O'Neill to LeRoi Jones, with consideration of selected films which have been 
adapted from plays. The course will consider the theories of the two media, 
and the influence they have had on one another. 

371a TOPICS IN ENGLISH LITERATURE Mr. Lester 

1970-71: W. B. Yeats. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Enrollment 
limited. 

375a TOPICS IN ENGLISH LITERATURE Mr. Satterthwaite 

1970-71: Gerard Manley Hopkins. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 
Enrollment limited. 

378b TOPICS IN ENGLISH LITERATURE Mr. Quinn 

1970-71: James Joyce. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Enrollment 
limited. 

398b SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES Staff 

A required course for majors, English 398b reviews the work of the program 
in preparation for the Comprehensive Examination. Procedure each year 
will be determined at a November inquiry (see under Major Requirements). 

480 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

Project courses consist of individual study and writing under the supervision 
of a member of the department. They are available only to advanced stu- 
dents and are offered only at the discretion of individual teachers. Candi- 
dates for Honors are expected to undertake, in the last semester of the 
senior year, a project leading to the Honors paper. 



104 



FINE ARTS Tl 



z 

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Associate Professor Charles Stegeman, Chairman 

Assistant Professor Christopher Cairns HI 

Professor Theodore B. Hetzel 
At Bryn Mawr 
Associate Professor Fritz Janschka H 

-i 

The aims of the courses in the field of Fine Arts are dual : (Q 

1 — For the students not majoring in Fine Arts: 

to develop the visual sense to the point where it increases 
human perception, and to present to the student the knowledge 
and understanding of all art forms and their historical context. 

2 — For students intending to major: 

beyond the foregoing, to promote thinking in visual terms and 
to foster the skills needed to give expression to these in a form 
of art. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

For those majoring in Painting or related two-dimensional disciplines: required 
courses: Fine Arts 101; two courses of Fine Arts 115a or b, 225a or b, 231a or b, 
241a or b, 251a or b; Fine Arts 233a and b; Fine Arts 333a or b; Fine Arts 371a 
or b; Fine Arts 499, plus three Art History courses to be taken at Bryn Mawr. 

For those majoring in Sculpture or related three-dimensional disciplines: 
required courses: Fine Arts 101; two courses of Fine Arts 115a or b, 224a or b, 
231a or b, 241a or b, 251 a or b; Fine Arts 243a and b; Fine Arts 343a or b; 
Fine Arts 371a or b; Fine Arts 499, plus three Art History courses to be taken at 
Bryn Mawr. 

101 FINE ARTS FOUNDATION PROGRAM Messrs. Cairns, Hetzel, Stegeman 

Drawing — D; Painting — P; Photography — F; Sculpture — S 
This course aims at introducing the student to at least three different disci- 
plines from the four presently offered by the department: drawing, painting, 
photography and sculpture. Each subject will be an introductory course, 
dealing with the formal elements characteristic of the particular subject as 
well as the appropriate techniques. In discussing these disciplines their 
interrelationships will be shown. Part of the work will be from Life model 
in drawing, painting and sculpture. These subjects will be offered as half- 
semester courses; one can choose all four in either or both semesters for 
two course credits or any three for one and one-half credits. 

The course will be structured so that the student experiences the differences 
as well as the similarities between the various expressions in art, thus afford- 
ing a "perspective" insight into the visual process as a basis for artistic 
expression. Enrollment limited. 

105 



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115a,b GRAPHIC ARTS Mr. Janschka 

Offered at Bryn Mawr College. 

225a,b ADVANCED DRAWING Mr. Janschka 

Offered at Bryn Mawr College. 

231a,b DRAWING ALL MEDIA Mr. Stegeman 

This course will deal with the various drawing media, such as charcoal, 
conte, pencil, ink and mixed media. It will explore the relationship between 
media, techniques and expression. The student will be exposed to the prob- 
lems involving space, design and composition as well as "thinking" in two 
dimensions. Part of the work will be from Life model. May be repeated for 
credit. Prerequisites: Fine Arts 101 and consent of the instructor. 

241 a,b DRAWING ALL MEDIA Mr. Cairns 

This course will deal in essence with the same problems as Fine Arts 231a, b. 
However, some of the drawing media will be clay modeling in half-hour 
sketches; the space and design concepts solve three-dimensional problems. 
Part of the work will be done from Life model. May be repeated for credit. 
Prerequisites: Fine Arts 101 and consent of the instructor. 

233a,b PAINTING: MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES Mr. Stegeman 

This course will allow a thorough investigation of the problems of (1) form, 
color texture and their interrelationships, (2) influence of the various paint- 
ing techniques upon the expression of a work, (3) the characteristics and 
limitations of the different media, (4) control over the structure and com- 
position of a work of art, and (5) the relationships of form and composition, 
and color and composition. Media will be primarily oils but acrylics, water- 
colors and egg tempera will be explored. Part of the work will be from Life 
model. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Fine Arts 101 and consent 
of the instructor. Enrollment limited. 

243 a,b SCULPTURE: MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES Mr. Cairns 

This course will develop ( 1 ) the awareness of the behavior of objects in 
space, (2) the concepts and techniques leading up to the control of form 
in space, and (3) the characteristics and limitations of the various sculpture 
media and their influence on the final work. Clay modeling techniques will 
be used predominantly but not exclusively. Part of the work will be done 
from Life model. Students will learn fundamental casting techniques. May 
be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Fine Arts 101 and consent of the 
instructor. Enrollment limited. 

251a,b PHOTOGRAPHY Mr. Hetzel 

A course in the use of photography to record and express information and 
emotion. Basic camera techniques and black/white processing will be taught, 
but emphasis will be on the creation of prints. May be repeated for credit. 
Prerequisites: Fine Arts 101 and consent of the instructor. Enrollment 
limited. 

333a,b EXPERIMENTAL STUDIO (PAINTING) Mr. Stegeman 

Prerequisites: Fine Arts 233a or b, and consent of the instructor. Enrollment 
limited. 



106 



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343a,b EXPERIMENTAL STUDIO (SCULPTURE) Mr. Cairns 

In these studio courses the student is encouraged to experiment with ideas 
and techniques with the purpose of developing a personal expression. It is 
expected that the student will already have a sound knowledge of painting or 
sculpture techniques and is at the stage where personal expression has become 
possible. At the end of the semester the student will exhibit his project. May 
be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Fine Arts 243a or b, and consent of the 
instructor. Enrollment limited. 

371a,b ANALYSIS OF THE VISUAL VOCABULARY: PAINTING AND 
SCULPTURE SINCE WORLD WAR II Mr. Stegeman 

This illustrated lecture and discussion course aims at developing the visual 
sense; at establishing a link of understanding between things seen and per- 
ceived, and concepts; to analyze and understand the meaning of art; to know 
and evaluate the individual expression of artists of the last twenty-five years. 
May be repeated for credit. Enrollment limited to 50. 

481a,b INDEPENDENT STUDY Messrs. Cairns and Stegeman 

This course gives the advanced student the opportunity to experiment with 
his concepts and ideas and to explore in depth his talent. Prerequisite: consent 
of the instructor. 

499 SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES Staff 

In this course the student reviews the depth and extent of his experience 
gained, and in so doing creates a body of work giving evidence of his 
achievement. At the end of the senior year the student is expected to pro- 
duce — in essence — a one-man show of his work. 



108 



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GENERAL COURSES 



HUMANITIES 201 INTERPRETATION OF LIFE IN WESTERN LITERA- 
TURE Messrs. Butman and Lubarski 

A study in their entirety of selected literary and philosophic works which 
are great imaginative presentations of attitudes toward life. The course spans 
Western culture from Homer to the present, and the readings are drawn 
from all the major literatures of the West, in the best available translations. 
Stress is laid on student involvement in issues raised by these books; con- 
sequently, the class work is handled entirely by the discussion method. 

HUMANITIES 301 TWENTIETH CENTURY FICTION Mr. Gutwirth 

A reading of major works from Proust to Borges, by way of loyce, Thomas 
Mann, and Italo Svevo. Individual students will be expected to take a leading 
part in the discussion of works falling within their major subjects. Faculty 
consultants will be called in from time to time to lecture or participate in 
the discussion of specialized topics. A reading knowledge of one foreign 
language relevant to the topic is required. Limited to 15 students. Prerequisite: 
consent of the instructor. 

LINGUISTICS 308 INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS Miss Dorian 

Language in the social context: human versus animal communication; child- 
hood language acquistion; bi-lingualism; regional dialects; usage and the 
issue of "correctness'"; social dialects; speech behavior and other cultures. 
Offered at Bryii Mawr as Interdepartmental Course 308. 

LINGUISTICS (ENGLISH) 147a LINGUISTICS, RHETORIC AND 

LITERATURE Mr. Ashmead 

An inquiry into applications of the new linguistics and the new rhetoric to 
the study, appreciation, and writing of literature. Each year the course will 
concentrate on a special topic, usually with the aid of visiting scholars. 
Not offered in 1970-71. 

109 



G) 

m 

2 



HUMANITIES 101 AND 102 THE WESTERN TRADITION 

(Freshman Seminar) 

A sequence of four semester courses enrolling 24 Freshmen who engage to ITI 
remain in the course for the full two years. The first year which takes the Tj 
form of a sequence of two freshman seminars, will be devoted to a study of ^^ 
the epic, the drama, philosophic and biblical writings spanning, roughly, the ^ 
era from Gilgamesh to Augustine. The second year, moving from Dante to f" 
Freud, takes in some of the major literary, philosophic, and artistic achieve- 
ment of the West in modem times. Visits to museums, a concert or two, a O 
film extend the range of the course beyond the written work. Two instructors m 
each year (four in all) will lead class discussions together and conduct *J 
tutorials separately. They will be drawn from Classics, Philosophy, History, ^ 
and one other department. 

Humanities 101 offered in 1971-72 and thereafter. 
Humanities 102 offered in 1972-73 and thereafter. 



m 



PSYCHOLOGY/SOCIOLOGY 153d,e,g STATISTICS FOR THE SOCIAL 
SCIENCES Staff 

A seven-week program designed to provide a basic level of insight into 
statistics: description of data sets, probability and sampling, and inference of 
population parameters from sample statistics. The specific statistics covered 
will be t-tests, correlation, chi-square and simple analysis of variance. Pro- 
grammed and conventional tests will be used with particular attention to 
working problems. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 216a AFRICAN CIVILIZATION 

Messrs. Glickman or Mortimer or MacGaffey 
Selected problems in the study of culture and politics in Africa, with empha- 
sis on a major country or region, different each year. In 1970-71: French- 
speaking Africa. Visits by artists, writers, academic commentators and 
statesmen. Research papers. Prerequisite: one year of social science and one 
year of humanities or consent of the instructor. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 262b THE AFRO-AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: SOUTH 
AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN Mr. Moore 

A selective inquiry into the social and cultural experiences of black people. 
Particular attention to Brazil, Cuba, Haiti, Jamaica, Guyana and the Do- 
minican Republic. Prerequisite: one year of social science and one year of 
humanities or consent of the instructor. 



GERMAN 

Professor John R. Gary, Chairman 

Assistant Professor Edward F. Bauer**** 

Assistant Professor Robert E. Stiefel 

Lecturer Maria Marshall 

The program of German is designed to enable the student to express 
himself in the spoken language, as well as to read, interpret, and write 
about the best and most representative German literature. From the 
early use of German in beginning classes to the investigation of style and 
structure in German literature, the student will become increasingly 
aware of the particular insights into human values and actions which 
one associates with authors like Goethe and Schiller, Kleist, Stifter, 
Kafka, Rilke, and Thomas Mann, and with epochs like early 19th 
century Romanticism or 20th century Expressionism. It is fair to 
assert that the German literary tradition forms an essential part of 
Western culture; acquaintance with that tradition should provide a 
heightened perception of the human condition and of artistic achieve- 
ment. 



= *0n leave, 1970-71. 

110 



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German Oil, 022 and 150a are primarily language courses. All Q 
students offering German for entrance are placed at the level where they m 
presumably can profit best by the course, according to a placement test 
given by the Department. Work in the Department should be supple- 
mented, whenever possible, by study in a language school or a university gj 
in Germany, Austria, or Switzerland. K 

The German Departments of Haverford College and Bryn Mawr Col- p 

lege cooperate in order to offer the widest possible range of courses to ^ 
students in both colleges. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

a. German 150a or its equivalent; 151a, 152b; at least three courses at the 300 
level (to be determined in consultation with the major adviser); 490. 

b. Two semester courses beyond the introductory level in some other depart- 
ment to be approved as related courses by the major supervisor. 

c. A comprehensive examination. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

Honors in German will be awarded on the basis of a consistently high per- 
formance in the literature courses and a grade of 85 or better in the comprehen- 
sive examination. High Honors will be awarded on the basis of a further oral 
examination. 

Oil BEGINNING GERMAN Staff 

The course consists of five class meetings per week in sections of approxi- 
mately ten students. The first semester covers the entire grammar, and 
particularly stresses understanding, speaking, and writing of carefully con- 
trolled compositions. In the second semester increased importance is given to 
reading as the course progresses. 

022 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN Staff 

The course consists of four class meetings per week in sections of approxi- 
mately ten students. Attention is given to specific grammatical difficulties 
and to vocabulary building. Modern literary texts are used as the basis of 
further language instruction and for the acceleration of reading speed. 
Progress in the language is supplemented by guided essay writing and tex- 
tual interpretation. Prerequisite: German Oil or a satisfactory performance 
on a placement test. 

055 GERMAN READING COURSE 

A special course designed for those who wish to acquire only a reading 
knowledge of German expository prose. The course may be used to fulfill 
the requirements of certain departments or graduate schools, but not the 
College foreign language requirement. 
Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

150a ADVANCED TRAINING IN THE GERMAN LANGUAGE 

Careful attention is given to the development of fluency in speaking and 
writing German. A variety of styles and readings will form the basis of 

111 



conversation, with a constant emphasis on an articulate and varied oral and 
written expression. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

151a, 152b INTRODUCTION TO THE GERMAN LITERARY TRADITION 

Messrs. Gary and Stiefel 
Representative works of the major genres and movements of German litera- 
ture from its beginnings to the present. The course offers students with a 
reading knowledge of German a foundation in the techniques of literary 
analysis as well as an introduction to a major European literary tradition. 
Prerequisite: German 022 or the equivalent. 

Fall term: From the beginnings through Goethe (800-1832) Mr. Gary 
Spring term: From Romanticism to the present (1800-1970) Mr. Stiefel 

351a GOETHE Mr. Gary 

Offered in 197 1-72 and alternate years. 

352a THE ROMANTIG MOVEMENT IN GERMAN LITERATURE, ART, 
AND MUSIG Mr. Gary 

Lectures, discussions, and readings of major writers (Novalis, Tieck, Bren- 
tano, Hoffmann, Eichendorff, Heine), painters (Friedrich, Runge), and 
composers (Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann) of one of the most pervasive of 
all German cultural movements. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

355a STUDIES IN GERMAN LYRIG POETRY Mr. Stiefel 

In the first part of the semester the class will read poetry representative of 
the following authors: Walther von der Vogelweide, Andreas Gryphius, 
Goethe, Holderlin, Heine, Hofmannsthal, Rilke, Brecht, Gelan, and Bier- 
mann. In the latter part of the semester the class will choose, from among 
the above, one poet whose works they will examine at greater length. Pre- 
requisite: consent of the instructor. 
Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

356b THE GERMAN NOVELLE 

Not offered in 1970-71. 

358b AUSTRIAN LITERATURE, 1815-1930 Mr. Stiefel 

Beginning with writings of Hugo von Hofmannsthal, we will seek to define 
the concept of a peculiarly Austrian literary tradition. Hofmannsthal's poetry, 
plays, and essays will lead us to a consideration of works by Raimund, 
Nestroy, Grillparzer, Stifter, and Schnitzler, as well as music by Mozart, 
Beethoven, and Mahler. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

480 INDEPENDENT STUDY Stafi^ 

This course offers the student of German literature an opportunity to probe 
more deeply and more independently into a problem or an area in which he 
is particularly interested. The nature of the course will therefore vary to 
suit the needs of each individual student. 

490 SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES Staff 

Conferences on selected writers. Members of the Department will share in 
the conducting of the conferences, which will focus on the works of authors 
to be included on the comprehensive examination. 

112 



GERMAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION 

273a THE 20TH CENTURY GERMAN NOVEL 

The German novels of the 20th century mirror the spiritual crisis in Western 
society. The best of these novels belong to v/orld literature, among them 
Rilke's The Notebooks of Make Laiirids Brigge, Mann's Magic Mountain, 
Hesse's Glass Bead Game, Kafka's The Trial, and Grass' The Tin Drum. 
Not offered in 1970-71. 

274b THREE COSMOLOGIES Mr. Stiefel 

A study of three epics, each of which is a major document of the German 
cultural tradition: Wolfram von Eschenbach's Parzival (c. 1200), Goethe's 
Faust (c. 1800), and Thomas Mann's Joseph and his Brothers (c. 1935). 
Reading in Enghsh or German; discussions in English. 
Offered in 1971-72. 

276b MUSICAL DRAMA IN AUSTRIA AND GERMANY, 1750 TO THE 
PRESENT Mr. Stiefel 

A literary and intellectual-historical study of dramatic texts written or 
adapted for music. Problems of musicology, dramaturgy, and stagecraft will 
be considered, according to the interests of the group assembled for the 
course. The list of works to be studied will include the St. Matthew Passion 
of Bach-Picander, The Magic Flute of Mozart-Schickaneder, The Ring of 
the Nibelungen by Wagner, selected writings of Nietzsche, Elektra and 
Ariadne by Strauss-Hofmannsthal, Wozzeck by Berg-BUchner, Moses and 
Aron by Schoenberg, and Mahagonny by Weil-Brecht. Conducted entirely in 
English, although students with a reading knowledge of German will be 
encouraged to turn to the original texts. 
Offered in 1971-72. 

277a THOMAS MANN'S DOCTOR FAUSTUS AND THE APOCALYPTIC 
VISION Mr. Stiefel 

A study of Thomas Mann's novel Doctor Faustus (1947) and some of its 
sources in the Bible, the Faust Book, Luther, Diirer, Shakespeare, Nietzsche, 
and Freud, in Monteverdi, Beethoven, Wagner, Mahler, and Schoenberg. 
We will read the novel at the beginning and at the end of the term; during 
the middle weeks we will consider the sources. We will also discuss parallel 
materials in selected films of Ingmar Bergman. Our studies will require us to 
consider problems in the nature of self-consciousness and to test seriously the 
proposition that our present culture is on the verge of collapse. Readings and 
discussion in English. Enrollment limited to 20; consent of the instructor 
required. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

278b EXPRESSIONISM IN GERMAN CULTURE Mr. Gary 

A study of Expressionism in various literary genres and in music and the 
visual arts. In addition to the movement itself, we will examine its historical 
roots by specialists in music and the visual arts. Lectures, discussion, and 
reading in English. 

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HISTORY J 

Professor John P. Spielman, Jr., Chairman Q) 

Professor Edwin B. Bronner >| 

Associate Professor Roger Lane Q 

Associate Professor John W. McKenna ■■ 

Assistant Professor Linda G. Gerstein ^ 

The study of history involves a reflective and critical analysis of 
human civilization through an investigation of a wide variety of its 
characteristic institutions. The curriculum in history is designed to en- 
courage the development of both critical and reflective habits of mind 
by balancing emphasis on primary source materials with the study of 
important secondary works. While the Department emphasizes the 
western tradition, it welcomes comparative studies, and seeks to relate 
its courses to the broadest possible spectrum of academic disciplines. 

While the Department has no specific language requirement, students 
who wish to major in history should note that some advanced courses 
require special preparation in foreign languages. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

History 1 1 1 plus eight additional semesters in history, which must include 
History 361f and History 399i (both of which are half-course units) and one 
topics course or independent study course involving a substantial written paper. 

Four semesters in related departments. At least two of these must be courses 
above the introductory level. 

Majors in history must take either a full year course at the intermediate level 
or at least one semester at the advanced level in three of the following fields: 
I) Ancient History, 2) Medieval History, 3) Modern European History, 4) 
American History. With his adviser's approval a major may substitute appropriate 
courses in Latin American, African, Near or Far Eastern History for one of 
these fields. 

History 36 If and History 399i are required of all majors. Both are half-course 
units: the first, a seminar on the critical use of evidence, will normally be taken 
the first semester of the junior year; the second, a seminar on historiography, in 
the second semester of the senior year. 

HONORS IN HISTORY 

Honors in History will be granted to those senior majors who, in the Depart- 
ment's judgment have combined excellent performance in History courses with 
a good over-all record. A grade of 85 or above in a History course will be con- 
sidered to represent work of Honors quality. High Honors may be awarded to 
students showing unusual distinction in meeting these criteria. 

115 



COOPERATION WITH BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

The History Departments of Haverford College and Bryn Mawr College 
cooperate in arranging their offerings so as to enrich as much as possible the 
opportunities available to students in both institutions. Several intermediate courses 
are offered jointly each year, alternating from one college to the other. Additional 
Bryn Mawr history courses open to Haverford students are listed at the end of 
this section. 

Ill INTRODUCTION TO WESTERN CIVILIZATION 

Messrs. Lane, McKenna, Spielman and Mrs. Gerstein 
A year course surveying Western European civilization from the fall of 
Rome to the present. The course deals with both institutional and intellectual 
currents in the western tradition. Conference discussions and lectures deal 
with both first-hand materials and secondary historical accounts. Open to 
freshmen and sophomores only. 

119a GREEK CIVILIZATION Mr. Luman 

A general survey of Greek history from Minoan Crete to the fall of Corinth. 
146 B.C., focusing on institutions, political and cultural life, social change 
and historiography. Lectures and discussions. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

120b ROMAN CIVILIZATION Mr. Luman 

A general survey of Roman history from the era of the foundation of the 
city to the death of Justinian the Great, concentrating on institutional, cul- 
tural and social history, with emphasis on the late Republic and the Empire. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

201 ENGLISH HISTORY Mr. McKenna 
The evolution of English institutions from Saxon times to the recent past. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

202 AMERICAN HISTORY Mr. Lane 
American history from colonial times to the present. 

Offered in 1970-71 at Haverford, and in alternate years at Bryn Mawr. 

203 MEDIEVAL EUROPE Mr. McKenna 
A topical survey of the medieval West from the reforms of Diocletian to the 
age of exploration. Particular emphasis on the development of political, 
economic, and religious institutions. 

Offered in 1970-71 at Bryn Mawr, and in 1971-72 at Haverford. 

204 REVOLUTIONARY EUROPE Mr. Spielman 
The political, intellectual, and technological revolutions in Europe from the 
late 18th century to 1848. 

Not offered in 1970-71. 

225 EUROPE SINCE 1848 Mrs. Gerstein 

The main political, social, and cultural developments of the European states 
since the mid- 19th century. 
Offered in 1970-71 at Haverford, and in alternate years at Bryn Mawr. 

116 



227 THE AGE OF ABSOLUTISM Mr. Spielman 

The emergence of the European state system from the early 17th century to 
the revolutions of the 18th century, including the revolutions in political and 
scientific thought. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

236b THE PROTESTANT REFORMATION Mr. Luman 

(See Religion 236b) 

240b HISTORY AND PRINCIPLES OF QUAKERISM Mr. Brenner 

The Quaker Movement is studied in relation to other intellectual and religious 
movements of its time and in relation to problems of social reform. The 
development of dominant Quaker concepts is traced to the present day and 
critically examined. The course is designed for non-Friends as well as for 
Friends. Open without prerequisite to sophomores, juniors and seniors. 
Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

241a THE IMPRESSIONIST ERA Mr. McCarthy 

(See French Civilization 241a) 

242b THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY PHILOSOPHES 

(See French Civilization 242b) 

243b CONTEMPORARY FRANCE Mr. McCarthy 

(See French Civilization 243b) 

244 RUSSIAN HISTORY Mrs. Gerstein 

A topical study of Russian history from Kiev to the death of Lenin. The 
first semester will deal with the problem of Russian medieval culture, the 
growth of Muscovite absolutism, and the impact of the West in the 18th 
century; the second semester will cover modernization, the growth of the 
radical intelligentsia and the Russian Revolution to 1924. 
Offered in 1971-72. 

340b TOPICS IN AMERICAN HISTORY Mr. Lane 

Class discussions and papers based on readings in the sources and secondary 
works. May be repeated for credit with change of content. Topic for spring 
semester 1970-71: Interpretations of American History. 

345a SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF WESTERN RELIGIOUS THOUGHT 

Mr. Luman 
(See Religion 345a) 

351a TOPICS IN REGIONAL HISTORY Mr. Bronner 

May be repeated for credit with change of content. Topic for fall semester, 
1970-71: The Delaware Valley. 

352b RELIGIOUS UTOPIAN MOVEMENTS IN THE UNITED STATES 

Mr. Bronner 
Utopian movements in the United States, with special emphasis on religious 
Utopian thought and communities from colonial times to the present. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

117 



355a TOPICS IN EUROPEAN HISTORY Mr. Spielman 

Seminar meetings and an extensive research paper based on reading in 
primary and secondary sources. May be repeated for credit with change of 
topic. Topic for fall semester 1970-71: The French Revolution, 1789-1795. 
Prerequisite: a reading knowledge of French. Topic for fall semester 1971-72 
to be announced. 

356b TOPICS IN MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY Mrs. Gerstein 

Seminar meetings and papers based on readings in source materials and 
interpretive works. May be repeated for credit with change of content. Topic 
for spring semester 1970-71: The Russian Revolution of 1917. Prerequisite: 
History 1 1 1 or consent of the instructor. 

357a TOPICS IN BRITISH HISTORY Mr. McKenna 

Seminar meetings and a substantial paper. May be repeated for credit with 
change of content. Topic for fall semester 1970-71: Tudor England. Pre- 
requisite: consent of instructor. 
Off eyed in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

358b TOPICS IN MEDIEVAL HISTORY Mr. McKenna 

Seminar meetings and a substantial paper based chiefly on contemporary 
sources in translation. May be repeated for credit with change of content. 
Topic for 1971-72 to be announced. Prerequisite: History 111 or consent of 
the instructor. 
Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

36 If SEMINAR ON HISTORICAL EVIDENCE Staff 

Occasional seminar meetings to discuss the nature of historical evidence and 
critical techniques for handling it; discussions and papers on mute evidence, 
written sources and the critical edition of a manuscript source. A half-course 
unit, enrollment limited to history majors for whom this is a required course. 

399i SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES Staff 

Occasional seminar meetings and papers exploring problems of historical 
interpretation; final oral examination. A half-course unit, enrollment limited 
to senior majors in history for whom this is a required course. 

480a,b,f,i INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

COURSES OFFERED AT BRYN MAWR 

209 EARLY AMERICAN HISTORY Mrs. Dunn 

211b MEDIEVAL MEDITERRANEAN Mr. Brand 

230 AFRO-AMERICAN HISTORY Mr. Aptheker 

302 FRANCE 1559-1661 Mr. Salmon 

303 RECENT AMERICAN HISTORY Mr. Dudden 
305 ITALIAN RENAISSANCE Mrs. Lane ; 
310b MEXICO Mrs. Dunn I 
314 HISTORY OF SCIENCE Mr. Culotta ! 
320a HOLLAND'S GOLDEN AGE Mr. Tanis ' 
321b REVOLUTION WITHIN THE CHURCH Mr. Tanis 

118 



MATHEMATICS ^ 

Professor Dale H. Husemoller, Chairman P 

Assistant Professor Harry J. Rosenzweig ^ 

Assistant Professor Francis X. Connolly 1 

Assistant Professor Joseph NEisENDORFERf "» 

Instructor Peter Atwood 5l 

> 

The aims of courses in mathematics are: (1) to promote rigorous j 
thinking in a systematic, deductive, intellectual discipline; (2) to present — 
to the student the direction and scope of mathematical development; fj 
(3) to foster technical competence in mathematics as an aid to the [0 
better comprehension of the physical, biological, and social sciences; 
and (4) to guide and direct the mathematics majors toward an interest 
in mathematical research. 

The following sequences are open to qualified entering students: 11 3 a, 
114b; 113a, 116b; 113a, 118b; 113a, 114b, 118b; and 119a, 220b. 
Students will be sectioned according to their previous background. 
Students with the equivalent of one or two semesters of college calculus 
may be admitted to Mathematics 1 19a upon consent of the Department. 

The more advanced courses cover work in the fields of analysis, 
algebra, and topology. The student majoring in the Department extends 
his studies into all of these areas. 

A program consisting of Mathematics 113a, 114b, 220b and 221a is 
especially suited for the needs of the physical sciences, while Mathe- 
matics 1 1 8b deals with those concepts of statistics and probability 
which are fundamental to the biological and social sciences. Mathematics 
1 1 6b is especially appropriate for the general liberal-arts student. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

Mathematics 221a, 222b, 331a, 332b, 333a, 334b, 335a, 336b, 399b, and either 
361a, 362b or 363a, f, 364b, i. Recommended collateral courses are Physics 115a, 
118b, 213a; Astronomy 211a; Economics 301a or for prospective actuaries, 
Economics 101a, 102b, 301a. 

Prescribed parallel reading on the history and general principles of mathe- 
matics. Two written comprehensive examinations, each three hours in length. 

It is recommended that facility in reading French and German be acquired 
early in the college course. 

tAppointed on the Sloan Foundation Grant. 

119 



REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

Honors will be granted to those senior Mathematics majors who, by means of 
their course work and the comprehensive examinations, have given evidence of 
their ability, initiative, and interest in the study of mathematics. High Honors 
will be awarded to the exceptionally able student. 



113a ONE- VARIABLE CALCULUS 

Messrs. Atwood, Connolly and Neisendorfer 

Differentiation and integration of functions of one variable. Applications: 
Taylor's formula and series. Elementary differential equations. 



114b MULTI-DIMENSIONAL CALCULUS AND LINEAR ALGEBRA Staff 

Vectors in n-space; partial derivatives; multiple integrals; theorems of Green 
and Stokes; divergence theorem; introduction to linear algebra. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 113a. 



116b TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS Staff 

A survey of topics in mathematics, including number theory, set theory, 
topology, geometry, probability, and game theory. The historical and philo- 
sophical aspects of mathematics will be emphasized. 



118b PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS Staff 

Introduction to probability with applications to statistics; least squares ap- 
proximations; general properties of distribution functions. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 113a. 



119a CALCULUS AND ANALYSIS Mr. Rosenzweig 

Review of calculus; series; partial derivatives and multiple integrals; intro- 
duction to linear algebra. Open to students with a background in calculus, 
but not open to those who have taken Mathematics 113a or 114b. Prerequi- 
site: consent of the instructor. 



220b ELEMENTARY COMPLEX ANALYSIS Mr. Rosenzweig 

Line integrals; complex derivatives; Cauchy theorem and residue calculations; 
elementary conformal mapping; harmonic functions; introduction to Laplace 
transforms. Prerequisite: Mathematics 119a or 114b. 

120 






221a LINEAR ALGEBRA Mr. Husemoller 

Groups; vector spaces; linear transformations; matrices; eigenvalues and 
eigenvectors; inner-product spaces; multilinear algebra. Prerequisite; Mathe- 
matics 114b or 119a. 



222b ANALYSIS I Mr. Husemoller 

The real number field; rigorous development of differential and integral 
calculus; metric spaces; fundamental theorem of ordinary differential equa- 
tions. Prerequisite: Mathematics 221a. 

331a, 332b ANALYSIS H, III Mr. Atwood 

Differential calculus on Euclidean space; inverse and implicit function theo- 
rems; the Riemann and Lebesque integrals; manifolds; Stokes theorem on 
manifolds; calculus of variations. Prerequisites: Mathematics 221a and 222b. 



333a, 334b ALGEBRA Mr. Connolly 

Topics from field theory, ideal theory of commutative rings, group theory, 
structure of rings. Examples to illustrate the theory will be drawn from 
Mathematics 221a. Prerequisites: Mathematics 221a and 222b. 



335a, 336b TOPOLOGY Mr. Rosenzweig 

General topology. Homotopy theory and fibre bundles; singular homology 
theory. Prerequisites: Mathematics 221a and 222b. 



361a, 362b SPECIAL TOPICS IN ALGEBRA AND TOPOLOGY 

Mr. Husemoller 

In 1970-71 the course will cover topics in covering spaces, Riemann surfaces, 
algebraic curves and singularities. Prerequisites: Mathematics 220a and 
Mathematics 333a, 334b or consent of the instructor. 



363a,f, 364b,i SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANALYSIS AND GEOMETRY 

Mr. Husemoller 

Half-course each term on the representation theory of finite groups the first 
term and Lie groups and algebras the second term. Prerequisite: consent of 
the instructor. 



399b SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES Staff 

Review and correlation of the various branches of mathematics. Content 
varies to fit student needs. This course may be taught as a seminar, a 
tutorial, or a lecture course, depending on student needs. 

121 



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^1 



MUSIC 9 

Professor John H. Davison, Chairman Q 

Professor William H. Reese (Q 

Professor Alfred J. SwANf Z 

Lecturer Harold Boatrite 
Lecturer Temple Painter 

The courses offered in music have as their objectives ( 1 ) the mastery 
of music materials and theory through the disciplines of counterpoint, 
harmony, and analysis, and subsequendy (2) the stimulation of the 
creative energies of the student through musical composition, (3) a 
knowledge of the styles and literature of a great art with its interrela- 
tion of trends, influences, aesthetic principles, personalities, and crea- 
tive processes over the centuries, and (4) the development of perceptive 
listening and refined hearing in connection with the aims stated above. 
The furthering and strengthening of the disciplines of music theory, 
performance and history is of value both to the general student and to 
the student with specialized musical interest and talent. For the latter, 
instruction in instrument or voice may be elected under Music 117a, 
118b. Advanced and specialized work in musicology is available in 
the form of supplementary courses at Bryn Mawr and Swarthmore 
Colleges and the University of Pennsylvania. At Haverford the program 
seeks in part to stimulate free composition in the vocal and instrumental 
forms with a view to public performance of a successfully completed 
work. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

A rounded course of study of music includes (1) work in theory, possibly em- 
bracing composition, (2) the study of music history, (3) direct expression in 
music through the medium of instrument or voice, and minimal abihty in the use 
of the keyboard. The Music major will work in both academic fields of theory 
and history, specializing in one of them. 

Required courses: For specialization in music theory and composition: Music 
011a or 012b, 113a-114b, 211a or 212b, 213a, 214b, 313a, 480, 490. For speciali- 
zation in music history: Music 011a or 012b, 113a-114b, 211a, 212b, 213a or 
214b, 480, 490. 

Supporting courses are to be arranged in such related fields of the humanities, 
history, language, history of art, and others, as may be approved by the Depart- 
ment. 

In addition the Music major is expected to reveal a proficiency and interest in 
instrumental playing and/or choral singing to the degree of participating actively 

tOn appointment first semester 1970-71. 

123 



in public performances from time to time during his college career. This will 
assure his having a direct experience with the living practice of a creative art. 
In addition, he must demonstrate a keyboard facility sufficient to encompass the 
needs of his theoretical and compositional studies. 

For those specializing in music theory and composition, the comprehensive 
examination for majors will consist of: (1) the completion by the candidate 
of a musical composition for instruments or voices in one of the larger forms, 
(2) an examination in music history, (3) an examination in music theory includ- 
ing harmony, counterpoint, analysis, dictation, and keyboard harmony. 

For those specializing in music history, the comprehensive examination for 
majors will consist of: (1) an examination in music history, (2) analysis of a 
work and other exercises involving theoretical musical knowledge, (3) the 
completion of a paper on an assigned subject in music history. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

The Honors candidate must perform satisfactorily in all required courses for 
music majors, and submit (a) in the case of specialization in composition, an 
orchestral composition of considerable stature showing creative talent as well as 
technical craftsmanship, and hence being worthy of a public performance, or 
(b) in the case of specialization in music history, a successfully completed project 
in musicological research, demonstrating mastery of the tools of this discipline, 
involving original thought, and showing ability in the creative interpretation of 
assorted materials bearing on a specific subject. 

OUa INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC HISTORY Mr. Reese 

A study of the principal forms of musical literature of the 17th, 18th, and 
19th centuries. No previous knowledge of music is required. 

012b SURVEY OF MUSIC HISTORY Staff 

A historical survey of the development of musical thought from the plain- 
song era to contemporary idioms. This course complements Music 011a but 
may be taken without it. No prerequisite. 

113a-114b ELEMENTARY MUSIC THEORY Messrs. Davison and Boatrite 

The basic materials of music: melody, scales, intervals, chords, meter, and 
rhythm. Counterpoint in two and three parts and harmony in four parts will 
be studied and implemented by ear-training, dictation, sightsinging, and 
analysis. Previous instruction or experience in some aspect of music is 
desirable. 

115a, 116b SEMINARS IN ANALYSIS AND PERFORMANCE PRACTICE 

Messrs. Davison and Painter 
The work of this course will consist of (1) regular performance in a 
choral, orchestral, or chamber-music group under the Department of Music 
and (2) classwork involving analysis of the music being performed by these 
groups in any given semester, as well as related repertoire, with attention 
given to problems of performance practice. Prerequisites: one semester of 
study in a music-theory or music-history course and consent of the instructor. 

124 



211a, 212b SEMINARS IN MUSIC HISTORY Staff 

The detailed study of certain epochs in music history or of the works of 
individual composers having special significance in the history of music. The 
content of Music 211a, 212b will be altered from year to year so that a 
diversity of subject matter will be available. It may be repeated for credit, 
with change of content. Prerequisite: Music 011a or 012b or the equivalent. 
Topics for 1970-71: 

Music 211a: The Music of Russia. Mr. Swan 

Music 212b: The Music of J. S. Bach. Mr. Reese 

117a, 118b PRIVATE MUSIC STUDY 

Private lessons (instrumental, vocal) to be arranged with the Department 

Chairman. 

Academic credit may be granted for private instrumental or vocal study under 

the following circumstances: 

1) The instructor must be approved by the Provost and the Music Depart- 
ment Chairman, to whom he will submit a detailed report of the student's 
work at the end of each semester. 

2) The student must demonstrate his accomplishment in his chosen field of 
study at an audition before members of the music faculty, or at a public 
recital. 

A short paper pertaining to the repertoire studied may be required. Prerequi- 
site: One semester of study in a music-theory or music-history course or 
the equivalent. The lessons will be at the student's own expense; in case of 
financial need, loans from the College may be arranged. 

213a, 214b ADVANCED THEORY AND COMPOSITION 

Messrs. Boatrite and Davison 
A continuation of Music 113a-114b, involving ear-training, keyboard har- 
mony, sightsinging, analysis, and composition, along with an introductory 
study of strict counterpoint as exemplified in the vocal style of the sixteenth 
century. In the second semester pieces are written in the eighteenth-century 
forms of the chorale-prelude, fugue, suite, and sonatina. Successful student 
compositions will be performed at demonstration concerts. Prerequisite: 
Music 11 3a- 114b. 

313a OPERA Mr. Reese 

A brief history, with concentrated investigation of representative works and 
theories. Lectures, reading, analysis, reports. Prerequisite: Music 011a or 
012b or the equivalent. 
Not offered in 1970-71. 

312b SEMINAR IN 20th-CENTURY MUSIC THEORY AND PRACTICE 

Mr. Boatrite 
Practical emphasis will be given to analysis of works of representative 
composers such as Hindemith, Schonberg, and Bartok. Prerequisite: Music 
214b. 

480 INDEPENDENT STUDY-PROJECTS IN MUSIC Staff 

490 SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES Staff 

125 



PHILOSOPHY TJ 

Professor Richard J. Bernstein, Chairman i 

Professor Paul J. R. Desjardins* P" 

Associate Professor L. Aryeh Kosman Q 

Associate Professor Josiah D. Thompson, Jr. UJ 

Assistant Professor Asoka Gangadean Q 

Assistant Professor Andrzej ZabludowskiI "^ 

The philosophy curriculum has three major aims. In the first place, "L 
it attempts to help each student develop a more self-critical attitude ^ 
toward life and the world by means of a confrontation with the thought 
of great philosophers of the past and present. The student is introduced 
to philosophical treatments of such problems as the nature of individual 
and social man, the nature of the world in which he lives, and the 
nature of his apprehension of, and response to, that world. Secondly, the 
philosophy curriculum is meant to help each student acquire philosophi- 
cal materials and skills which supplement and help integrate his other 
studies, in the arts, the social sciences, the natural sciences, or religion. 
Finally, the philosophy curriculum is designed to offer certain students a 
foundation in knowledge and technique for further studies in philosophy 
or related fields at the graduate level. 

All philosophy majors are expected to have a reading knowledge of at 
least one foreign language. Some advanced philosophy courses may re- 
quire reading knowledge of a foreign language as a prerequisite for 
admission. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

Philosophy 101 (or equivalent), 399b, and eight other semester courses ap- 
proved by the major supervisor, four from the Philosophy Department and four 
from some other department or departments closely related to the student's 
special study in philosophy. 

A written comprehensive examination and an oral examination. The written 
examination will cover the history of philosophy, ethics, social and political 
philosophy, philosophy of religion, logic, metaphysics, the theory of knowledge, 
and philosophy of science. The oral examination will be based on the written 
examination. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

Honors in philosophy are awarded for special work of high quality, usually in 
the form of a thesis, on an important topic, problem, or philosopher approved 
by the major supervisor. One or more project courses may be used toward this 

*On sabbatical leave, first semester, 1970-71. 
tAppointed on the Sloan Foundation Grant. 

127 



end. Honors will not be given unless the candidate has an average grade of at 
least 85 in the comprehensive examination; High Honors require an average of 
at least 90. 

101 HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY Staff 

An understanding of the nature and functions of philosophy and its relations 
to other fundamental human concerns, such as religion, the sciences, and 
the arts, is sought through a study of selected works of the great philosophers 
in Western history. No prerequisite. Closed to juniors and seniors except in 
special cases. 

103 THE ORIGINS OF PHILOSOPHY Mr. Desjardins 

The relative functions of myth, logic, and history in Homer, Hesiod, the 
Pre-Socratics. These themes will be investigated in three non-Western cul- 
tures: Chinese, Japanese, Dogon. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 
Not offered in 1970-71. 

105 PHILOSOPHY: EAST AND WEST Mr. Desjardins 

Critical examination of theories about the differences between East and 
West in light of selected classical texts: Plato's Republic, the Confucian 
Corpus, the Tao Te Ching, and some early Chinese, Japanese, and Buddhist 
literature. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 
Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

107a LOGIC Mr. Gangadean 

Examination of classical term logic (syllogistic inference, categorical syllo- 
gisms), propositional logic (truth-function theory), and introduction to 
quantification theory. The interrelations between these will be examined. 
Stress will be on logic as a theory of discourse — the connection between 
logic and language will be explored. The above logical theories will be 
applied to inferences and arguments in ordinary discourse. Examination of 
validity, formal proof, and properties of a formal system. Some attention 
will be given to inductive inference. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 

108b ADVANCED LOGIC Mr. Davidon 

A study of the capabilities and limitations of algorithms for proving or 
refuting conjectures formulated in a first-order predicate logic. Topics con- 
sidered include the Godel completeness and incompleteness theorems, de- 
cidable and undecidable theories, and the use of computers for proof searches. 
Some aspects of the foundations of mathematics will be explored. Pre- 
requisite: permission of the instructor. 

201a PLATO Mr. Desjardins 

A study of a selected group of the Dialogues. Prerequisite: permission of the 

instructor. 

During 1970-71, this course will be offered in the second semester as 201b. 

128 



204b ARISTOTLE Mr. Kosman 

A study of a selection of the primary works of Aristotle. Prerequisite: 
Philosophy 101. 
Offered in 1970-71 in the first semester as 204a. 

225a, 226b RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS IN INDIA: ANCIENT AND 
MODERN Mr. Long 

(See Religion 225a, 226b) 

229a RELIGIOUS IDEAS IN MODERN CULTURE Mr. Long 

(See Religion 229a) 

301 EARLY MODERN PHILOSOPHY Mr. Kosman 

A study of the development of philosophic thought in the seventeenth and 
eighteenth centuries. Attention will be focused on the writings of representa- 
tive thinkers. Selections from some of the following: Bacon, Locke, Ber- 
keley, Hume, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibnitz. Prerequisite: permission of the 
instructor. 
Offered in 1970-71 in the second semester as 301b. 

303a GREEK PHILOSOPHIC TEXTS Mr. Kosman 

A close analysis of Greek philosophic writings. Prerequisite: Classics 101a 
or permission of the instructor. 
Not offered in 1970-71. 

334b KANT 

A study of selected major texts with special emphasis on the first Critique. 
Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 
Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

337a RELIGIOUS ETHICS Mr. Stark 

(See Religion 337a) 

338a PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION Mr. Stark 

(See Religion 338a) 

309a PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE Mr. Zabludowski 

A study of important philosophical issues raised by the sciences concerning, 
among other topics, the nature of scientific explanation and knowledge, law 
and chance, theory and observation, causality, purpose, freedom and de- 
terminism. This course is specifically designed for students without substantial 
background in natural science. Natural science majors and other students 
with a substantial background in the natural sciences are referred to Philos- 
ophy 356b; The Logic of Explanation. Prerequisite: permission of the 
instructor. 

129 



343 HEGEL AND POST-HEGELIAN THINKERS 

Messrs. Bernstein and Spiegler 
After a brief review of selected Hegelian texts in their cultural milieu, the 
course of 19th and 20th century philosophy will be examined. Principal 
texts from some of the following movements will be studied: Marxism, 
Existentialism, Phenomenology, and Analytic Philosophy. Prerequisite: per- 
mission of the instructor. 

345a THE PHILOSOPHY OF EXISTENCE Mr. Thompson 

A study of some of the principal texts of nineteenth-century existentialism. 

Readings in Kierkegaard or Nietzsche. Prerequisite: permission of the 
instructor. 

346a THE PHENOMENOLOGY OF EXISTENCE Mr. Thompson 

A study of selected texts in 20th century phenomenology. Readings in 
Heidegger, Sartre, or Merleau-Ponty. Prerequisite: permission of the in- 
structor. 

348a PHILOSOPHY OF LOGIC Mr. Gangadean 

The focus will be on logic as an organon for philosophy. Theory of predica- 
tion will be compared and constrasted with propositional logic and quantifi- 
cation theory. The effectiveness of each as an instrument for dealing with 
typical philosophical questions arising out of ordinary language as well as 
typical metaphysical and ontological questions will be discussed. Such 
meta-logical issues as the relation between intensional and extensional logic, 
between meta-language and object language, between propositional negation 
and predicate denial, between propositional and predicative truth, etc., will 
be examined. Selected writings of Aristotle, Frege, Russell, Ramsey, Quine, 
Strawson, and Sommers will be studied. Prerequisite: Philosophy 107a or 
permission of the instructor. 

348b PHILOSOPHY OF LOGIC Mr. Gangadean 

Topic for 1970-71: The Logic of Language 

An investigation into the nature and structure of language from the perspec- 
tives of logical theory and linguistic theory (i.e., empirical linguistics and the 
generative and transformational approach to syntax). Such topics as the syn- 
tactic, semantic and pragmatic dimensions of language, theory of predication, 
theory of types and categories, tree-theory for natural language, theory of 
negation, etc., are explored. Writings of Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Quine, 
Sommers, Chomsky, Fodor, Katz, and others are examined. 

351a LITERARY THEORY AND CRITICISM Mr. Rose 

(See English 351a) 
Not offered in 1970-71. 

350b MODERN ANALYTIC PHILOSOPHY Mr. Kosman 

A study of the historical and theoretical development of analytic philosophy 

130 



in England and America. Selected writings of Russell, Wittgenstein, Ayer, 
Wisdom, and others, with special emphasis on theory of language. Pre- 
requisite: permission of the instructor. 

352b METAPHYSICS AND EPISTEMOLOGY Mr. Gangadean 

A critical examination of classical and recent conceptions of being and 
existence, and of the nature and possibility of metaphysics. Such topics as 
methodology of metaphysical analysis, the relation between the structure of 
thought and the structure of reality, ontology; the nature and formation of 
categories and conceptual frameworks, the relation between metaphysics and 
science, etc., are explored. Writings of Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Kant, 
Heidegger, Strawson, Sommers, and others are studied. 
Offered in 1971-72. 

353a SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY Mr. Thompson 

A critical exploration of the web of problems that concern man's place 
in society. Classical approaches will be studied and the student will be en- 
couraged to apply these approaches to the understanding of the salient social 
problems of his time. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 

354b CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHIC PROBLEMS Mr. Bernstein 

A study of contemporary treatments of philosophic problems in Europe and 
America. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 

356b THE LOGIC OF EXPLANATION Mr. Zabludowski 

A study of what the sciences have to say about the nature of the physical 
world and the inquiring mind within it. Some of the topics discussed will 
be the same as those mentioned in Philosophy 309a: Philosophy of Science, 
But, unlike Philosophy 309a, this course is specifically designed for natural- 
science majors and other students with a greater background in the natural 
sciences. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 

357 ETHICS Mr. Desjardins 

A study of certain major proposals concerning the norms which ought to 
govern human life. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 
Not offered in 1970-71 

399b SENIOR SEMINAR Staff 

Seminar meetings, aimed at helping senior philosophy majors achieve 
greater comprehension and comprehensiveness with regard to the history of 
philosophy and selected problems. Required of, and open only to, senior 
philosophy majors. 

480 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

Individual consultation with independent reading and research. Prerequisite: 
permission of the instiiictor. 



k 



131 






PHYSICS 

Associate Professor Douglas Miller, Chairman 

Professor William C. Davidon* 

Assistant Professor Walter J. Trela 

Assistant Professor Jerry P. Gollub 

Assistant Professor J. Kemp RANDOLPHf 

The Physics curriculum introduces students to concepts and methods 
which are now fundamental throughout the sciences. It provides oppor- 
tunities for first-hand experimental investigations together with the 
study of those basic principles that have led to profound scientific, 
philosophical, and technological developments in the 20th century. 

Non-science majors who wish a one-semester, largely qualitative and 
historical study of those particular concepts which have had the most 
general impact on our society are encouraged to take Physics 117b. 
Those who wish a more quantitative one-year course with laboratory 
should consider Physics 113a and 114b. 

Prospective science majors are advised to study some physics in their 
freshman or sophomore years because all contemporary sciences rely 
heavily on basic physical principles. Potential natural scientists who 
take college mathematics or have some background in physics should 
take Physics 115a and 116b. 

The Physics curriculum features a basic sequence of five introductory 
and intermediate courses which are required of all majors. Following 
this basic sequence of courses, a student is offered a maximum of 
flexibility in pursuing his scientific interests. Students planning graduate 
work in Physics will need five advanced courses in Physics, numbered 
312a and above, which are to be chosen in consultation with the 
Department. Students with interests in the interdisciplinary fields of 
astrophysics, biophysics, chemical physics, mathematical physics, phi- 
losophy of science, or medical science can base their studies upon a 
foundation of introductory and intermediate Physics courses. 

The senior year in the Physics Department features an opportunity 
for a supervised research project and a supervised teaching experience. 



=''0n leave first semester, 1970-71. 
tAppointed on the Sloan Foundation Grant. 

132 



MAJOR REQUIREMENTS Jl 

Classes of 1971 and 1972 — the former Physics 19, 20, 25, 26 and two J 
additional courses in Physics numbered from 312a to 318b. 

Class of 1973 — the former Physics 19, 20; 213a, 311b and two additional 
courses in Physics numbered from 312a to 318b. 

Class of 1974 — Physics 115a, 116b, 213a, 214b, 311a, and one additional 
course in Physics numbered from 312a to 318b. 



2. Mathematics 113a, 114b or 119a; 120b and 221a. 

3. Two additional courses selected from Physics courses from 312a to 318b, 
and Bryn Mawr courses 202b and 301a, 

or from Astronomy 301a, 320b, 340b 

or from Chemistry 203a, 304b, 306b 

or from Biology 201b, 203b, Chemistry 203a 

or from Mathematics 202b, 333a, 334b 

or from Philosophy 107a, 301, 356b. 

4. One semester selected from Physics courses numbered above 400. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

The granting of Honors in Physics will be based upon the quality of per- 
formance in course work and in the supervised teaching experience, or the 
research tutorial. 

113a, 114b PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICS Mr. Randolph 

Four hours, including one laboratory period 

Certain fundamental concepts of contemporary physics are presented, with 
particular emphasis on conservation laws and symmetry principles. These 
concepts are used in the analysis of both macroscopic and microscopic phe- 
nomena. In Physics 113 a, the focus is on conservation of energy, linear 
momentum and angular momentum; in Physics 114b, electric charge, entropy 
and baryon number are considered. Those mathematical concepts beyond high 
school algebra which are necessary for the course will be developed as 
needed. No prerequisites. 

115a BASIC PHYSICS Messrs. Trela and Miller 

Four hours, including one laboratory period 

Fields due to neutral and charged particles at rest and in motion; conserva- 
tion laws; scattering; orbital motion. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 113a (concurrently). Prior acquaintance with 
physics is desirable. 

116b BASIC PHYSICS Messrs. Gollub and Davidon 

Four hours, including one laboratory period 

Induced fields, photons, special relativity, models of atomic and nuclear 
structure. Prerequisite: Physics 115a. 

133 



n 



]17b PHYSICS IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY Mr. Davidon 

Three hours; no laboratory 

Development of the theory of relativity, the quantum theory, and nuclear 
physics, with dual emphases on the scientific elements of the theories and the 
broader implications that they have had in our culture. A study of the current 
goals of science will lead into a discussion of such contemporary problems 
for the scientific community as space research and the space program, high- 
energy physics research, government and military support of science. The 
latter problems will be studied by small groups of students and discussed in 
seminar, with specialists invited from outside the Department, including 
Philips visitors. 

213a ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES Mr. Gollub 

Four hours, including one laboratory period 

Oscillations, circuit analysis, electronics, plane waves, optics. Prerequisite: 
Physics 114b or 116b. 

214b ELECTRIC AND MAGNETIC FIELDS Mr. Davidon 

Four hours, including one laboratory period 

Multipole moments. Maxwell's equations, static field distributions, spherical 
waves. Laboratory work with the computer. 
Prerequisite: Physics 213a. 
Offered in 1971-72 and thereafter. 

311a,b INTRODUCTORY QUANTUM MECHANICS Mr. Miller 

Four hours, including one laboratory period 

Inference of quantum principles from experiment, algebra of symmetries 
and conservation laws, energy levels, intrinsic spin and quantum statistics, 
emission of light. 

Prerequisites: Physics 116b or 214b, and Mathematics 221a. 
311b offered in 1970-71; 311a offered in 1972-73 and thereafter. 

312a,b NUCLEAR PHYSICS Mr. Miller 

Four hours, including one laboratory period 

Properties of the deuteron, scattering theory, isotopic spin, nuclear models, 
pion-nucleon interactions. 
Prerequisite: Physics 311a or b. 
312a offered in 1971-72; 312b offered in 1973-74. 

313a,b PARTICLE PHYSICS Mr. Davidon 

Three hours; no laboratory 

Classification of particles and unitary symmetry; scattering theory including 
relativistic kinematics; production and decay of unstable particles. Prerequi- 
site: Physics 312a or b. 
313b offered in 1971-72; 313a offered in 1973-74. 

314b STATISTICAL PHYSICS Mr. Gollub 

Four hours, including one optional laboratory period 
The statistical formulation of the description of a system of many particles 

134 



is developed. This technique is used to deiive the laws of thermodynamics 
and statistical mechanics. The macroscopic thermal properties of gases, solids 
and liquids are then studied. Prerequisite: Physics 311a or b. 
Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

315a DYNAMICS OF WAVES AND PARTICLES Mr. Gollub 

Four hours, including one laboratory period 

Oscillations, circuit analysis, electronics, plane waves, optics. Prerequisite: the 
former Physics 20. 
Offered in 1970-71 but not thereafter. 

316b SOLID STATE PHYSICS Mr. Trela 

Four hours, including one laboratory period 

Crystal symmetries, binding forces, lattice vibrations, specific heats, free 
electron theory of metals, energy bands, semi-conductors, magnetism, super- 
conductivity. Prerequisite: Physics 311a or b. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

317a MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS Mr. Davidon 

Three hours 

Applications to physics of linear algebra, Fourier analysis, integration in the 

complex plane, differential equations, calculus of variations, and group theory. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 120b, 221a. 

Offered in 1971-72 and thereafter. 

318a,b QUANTUM MECHANICS Mr. Miller 

Four hours, including one optional laboratory period 

Conservation of charge, leptons and baryons; creation and annihilation of 
matter and anti-matter; symmetries in space and time; decay processes. Pre- 
requisites: the former Physics 25 or 311a or b. 
318a offered in 1970-71; 318b offered in 1972-73. 

411a, 412b THEORETICAL PHYSICS Mr. Davidon 

A program of lectures, readings and independent work on current problems 
and methods in theoretical physics. Applications of group theory to the study 
of symmetry in physics will be emphasized. 

415a, 416b HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS Mr. Miller 

A research tutorial including theoretical and experimental work on strong 
and electromagnetic interactions. 

417a, 418b LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS Messrs. Trela and Gollub 

Supervised student research in superconductivity and hquid helium. Experi- 
ments are performed at temperatures down to 1°K. 

450a.b ASSOCIATION IN TEACHING BASIC PHYSICS Staff 

Student association with staff in Physics 113a. 114b, 115a or 116b; involves 
leadership in recitation meetings and supervision of laboratory meetings. 
Open to seniors. 

135 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Harvey Glickman, Chairman'^* 

Assistant Professor G. Eric Hansen 

Assistant Professor Robert A. Mortimer 

Assistant Professor Sara M. Shumer 

Assistant Professor Sidney R. Waldman, Acting Chairman 

Lecturer Zelbert MooREft 

Visiting Lecturer Tadeusz K. Krauze f 

Visiting Lecturer Murray S. LEViNft 

Diplomat-in-Residence with the rank of Professor 

Norman B. Hannah 

The poHtical science curriculum is designed to give students an 
understanding of political organization and political forces in modern 
society, to provide knowledge and a basis for insight and judgment 
on the problems involved in the relationship of the individual to 
government, and of governments to one another. The broad areas 
of study include: analysis of political theory in relation to its insti- 
tutional environment, comparison and appraisal of different types of 
governments and political organization, American political behavior 
and institutions, and problems of international relations. 

The courses are designed primarily for a liberal arts education and 
are intended to create intelligent and lasting interest and participation 
in the formulation of public policy. The training will also serve the 
needs of men contemplating scholarship and teaching in political 
science, as well as other professional careers such as law, journahsm, 
and the public service. 

In advanced courses, emphasis is placed upon individual research 
and analysis — • practice in concept formation, location, organization, 
and presentation of data - — and upon independent judgment. 

Majors in political science are expected to understand the relationship 
of this field to other social studies, as well as to the purposes and 
methods of the social sciences as a whole. They are thus expected to 
take supporting courses in economics, history, sociology, and psychology. 



*'''On leave, second semester, 1970-71. 

tOn appointment first semester 1970-71. 
ttOn appointment second semester 1970-71. 

136 



MAJOR REQUIREMENTS "U 

To enter the Department: Political Science 151a or 152b, and one other course Q 

in the 100 series. Departmental studies: Political Science 391a, 392b, and six _ 

other courses in political science, distributed among three of the four areas of JZ 

study: 1) comparative politics, 2) American politics, 3) international relations, J 

and 4) poHtical theory and political philosophy. ^^ 

Four approved semester courses in other social sciences. fj 

A general examination synthesizing major studies, including a special field ^ 
chosen from among the four areas of study indicated. p- 

In the senior year majors vv'ill enroll in the Senior Seminar in Political Studies 
(391a), and in Research and Writing on Political Problems (392b). Association ||j 
in Teaching (371a or 372b) is open to selected seniors. rt 

HONORS ni 

The award of Departmental Honors is determined on the basis of a thesis, an 2 
oral examination, the quality of course work, and performance in the general m 
examination. *• 

in 

151a, 152b POLITICS: POLITICAL ANALYSIS AND PUBLIC POLICY 

Staff and Student Associates in Teaching 
Case studies in political affairs, focusing on problems of contemporary im- 
portance, illustrating principles of political activity and techniques of analysis. 
Examples of topics considered: The Politics of Selective Service; Governing 
the University; Politics and Policy in Education; Pressure Politics: Oil; The 
Urban Crisis; the New York Teachers' Strike; The Cuban Missile Crisis; 
Revolution in China; Political Development and Decay: Nigeria; Decoloniza- 
tion and Peacekeeping in the Congo. 
Open to freshmen and sophomores only. 

Political Science 151a and 152b provide the student with a basic understand- 
ing of the major elements of the political process; either one is a prerequisite 
for further work in political science. 

154b THE POLITICAL LEADER Mr. Mortimer 

Examination of the interaction between the political leader and his society; 
impact of leadership styles on the polity, as well as impact of the exercise of 
power on leadership; personality, ideology and institutions as determinants 
of leadership. Case studies of selected leaders in Europe and the "Third 
World" (e.g., De Gaulle, Senghor, Bourguiba), bearing on the leader as 
political thinker and actor. Prerequisite: Political Science 151a or 152b or 
consent of the instructor. Enrollment limited. 
Open to freshmen and sophomores only. 

156b POLITICAL THEORY: THE CITIZEN AND THE STATE Miss Shumer 
Selected problems involved in the question of the individual's relationship to 
the polity: liberty and authority, obligation and civil disobedience, political 
thought and action. Examination of classical and contemporary theorists, 
such as Plato, Machiavelli, Rousseau and Marx. Prerequisite: Political 
Science 151a or 152b or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited. 
Open to freshmen and sophomores only. 

137 



158b THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY AND THE BUREAUCRACY 

Mr. Waldman 
Examination of the institution of the Presidency in the past few decades, 
focusing on the ways the President relates to Congress, his own staff, the 
executive bureaucracy, his party, the media and the public. Special attention 
to the executive bureaucracy and its relations with Congress and interest 
groups. Prerequisite: Political Science 151a or 152b and permission of the 
instructor. Enrollment limited. 
Open to freshmen and sophomores only. 

160b PROBLEMS IN AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY Mr. Hansen 

Examination of important substantive questions of policy in order to 
illuminate major trends and premises evolved since World War II. Case 
studies, such as: Berlin and Germany, Formosa and Communist China, re- 
lations with India, foreign aid. Attention to policy-making processes. Pre- 
requisite: Political Science 151a or 152b or permission of the instructor. 
Enrollment limited. 

Open to freshmen and sophomores only. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

162b SCIENCE AND POLITICS Mr. Hansen 

Survey of the impact of science and technology on American society and 
politics. Emphasis on the impact of the growth of knowledge on the develop- 
ment of social skills and stratification and on the consequences for the allo- 
cation of political resources. Case studies, such as: the military-industrial 
estabUshment, the space program, application of science and technology to 
contemporary social problems. Prerequisite: Political Science 151a or 152b 
or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited. 
Open to freshmen and sophomores only. 
Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

203a GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS IN EAST ASIA Mr. Steslicke 

A comparative examination of East Asian political systems with special 
emphasis on modern Japanese government and politics. 
Offered at Bryn Mawr. 

205a GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS IN WESTERN EUROPE Mr. Frye 
A comparative analysis of the contemporary political systems of Great 
Britain, France, and Germany or Scandinavia, with special reference to 
factors making for stable and effective democracy. 
Offered at Bryn Mawr. 



208b INTRODUCTION TO LATIN AMERICAN POLITICS 

A comparative analysis of political systems of Latin America. 
Offered at Bryn Mawr. 



A 



209b WESTERN POLITICAL THOUGHT Mr. Salkever' 

A study of the fundamental problems of modern Western political thought, 
based on an analysis of the writings of the leading theorists. 
Offered at Bryn Mawr. 

138 



210a THE SOVIET SYSTEM Mr. Hunter 

(See Economics 210a) 

Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

216a AFRICAN CIVILIZATION Messrs. Glickman or Mortimer or McGaffey 
(See Social Science 216a — General Courses) 

218a URBAN POLITICS Mr. Ross 

Rise of cities, urban groups, forms of political organization in urban areas, 
current problems of cities. Cross-cultural comparisons. 
Offered at Bryn Mawr. 

219b AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL LAW Miss Leighton 

An analysis of some of the basic principles and processes of American public 
law. Attention is centered on decisions and opinions of the Supreme Court 
as they relate to the formation of public policy and to value patterns of 
American liberal democracy. 
Offered at Bryn Mawr. 

220a INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS Mr. Hansen 

Examination of major theoretical problems, as well as substantive trends, in 
international politics. Particular use of systems theory in illuminating case 
studies drawn from the international arena of the years after World War II, 
including the Soviet-American confrontation, the emergence of the "Third 
World," and the revolution in weapons technology. Prerequisite: Political 
Science 151a or 152b or consent of the instructor. Enrollment limited. 

221a INTERNATIONAL LAW Miss Leighton 

An examination of the doctrines and practices of international law. Tradi- 
tional material is considered in the context of the contemporary political 
process, with some emphasis on methodological problems. 
Offered at Bryn Mawr. 

113a AMERICAN POLITICAL PROCESS: PARTIES, THE CONGRESS, 
AND THE PRESIDENT Mr. Waldman 

A functional and behavioral analysis of the policy-making process. Political 
parties, legislative behavior, and powers and the interactions between the 
President and Congress will be examined. Prerequisite: Political Science 
151a or 152b and consent of instructor. Enrollment limited. 

225b COMPARATIVE POLITICS: POLITICAL DEVELOPMENT 

Mr. Glickman 
A study of the theory and processes of political modernization in new states. 
Problems include the impact of the West on traditional societies, the growth 
and effects of nationalism, institutional transfer, political reconstruction and 
development policy. Prerequisite: Political Science 151a or 152b or consent 
of the instructor. 

226b INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION Mr. Hansen 

Examination of underlying patterns of community in international political 
systems and the possibilities for an emerging social consensus; survey of 

139 



international organizations, such as the United Nations and regional group- 
ings. Attention to internationally organized processes such as peaceful settle- 
ment of disputes, diplomatic practice, negotiation. Prerequisite: Political 
Science 220a or consent of the instructor. Enrollment limited. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

227a AMERICAN POLITICAL THEORY Miss Shumer 

The study of the foundations of American politics through an exploration 
of the roots and development of American political thought and institutions 
and an analysis of their theoretical assumptions and implications. Pre- 
requisite: Political Science 151a or 152b or consent of the instructor. 

228b PUBLIC OPINION, PRIVATE INTERESTS, AND THE POLITICAL 
SYSTEM Mr. Waldman 

An in-depth analysis of the formation of political attitudes, the functions of 
public opinion in shaping public policy, and the impact of interest groups on 
that policy. Prerequisite: Political Science 151a or 152b and consent of 
instructor. Enrollment limited. 
Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

229b PROBLEMS IN CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN POLITICAL 

THEORY Miss Shumer 

A study of selected issues which pose fundamental problems to the American 
political system, such as the decline of pluralism, mass society, bureaucracy, 
technology and violence. Prerequisite: Political Science 151a or 152b or 
consent of the instructor; 223a and 227a are recommended. 

231a RECENT POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: SOURCES AND VARIETY 

Mr. Salkever 
Examination of alternative ways of formulating and answering basic ques- 
tions in 20th century political philosophy. Attention given first to 19th 
century theorists, e.g., Marx and Mill. Issues considered: value of liberty, 
justification of democracy, articulation of personal autonomy, political obliga- 
tion as discussed by modern authors such as Dewey, Niebuhr, Ortega, 
Oakeshott, Wolff, Camus, Arendt and Strauss. Prerequisite: Political Science 
299b or either Philosophy 101 or 201. 
Offered at Bryn Mawr. 

232b LAW AND EDUCATION Mr. Wofford 

An exploration of the principle of persuasion in the United States Constitu- 
tion and the common law, with special attention to the educational implica- 
tions of the First Amendment and to the theory and practice — uses and 
abuses — of civil disobedience. Reading will include legal cases and com- 
mentaries as well as some basic literature in political theory. Enrollment 
limited. 
Offered at Bryn Mawr. 

252b RATIONALITY, PURPOSE AND COLLECTIVE WELFARE 

Mr. Waldman 

An examination of the problems involved in defining "the public good." 
Focus on recent attempts by political economists to bridge the gap between 

140 



I 



individual rationality and welfare on the one hand, and collective rationality 
on the other. Investigation of alternative models of individual and collective 
rationality and their implications for definitions of social welfare. Prerequi- 
site: Political Science 151a or 152b and consent of the instructor. Enrollment 
limited. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

258b PUBLIC POLICY: CIVIL RIGHTS AND POVERTY Miss Shumer 

An historical and analytical inquiry into the scope and nature of the prob- 
lems in the selected policy area of civil rights and poverty, and the systematic 
analysis of the capacity of the present political system (including the govern- 
ment and non-governmental groups) to deal effectively with these problems. 
Prerequisite: Political Science 151a or 152b or consent of the instructor; 
223a and 227a are recommended. 
Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

262b THE AFRO-AMERICAN EXPERIENCE Mr. Moore 

(See Social Science 262b — General Courses) 

263a IMPERIALISM, NATIONALISM AND DECOLONIZATION 

Mr. Mortimer 
Examination of forces in international politics leading to the decline of em- 
pires and the rise of new states in the "Third World" in recent years. Em- 
phasis on the connections between domestic and external politics; comparison 
of foreign policies; role of ideologies. Prerequisite: Political Science 151a 
or 152b or consent of the instructor. Enrollment limited. 
Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

266b POLITICS AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS IN THE MIDDLE 
EAST AND NORTH AFRICA Mr. Mortimer 

Examination of the main currents of internal political change and interstate 
relations. Emphasis on the interaction of ideologies, leadership and social 
transformations. Prerequisite: Political Science 151a or 152b or consent of 
the instructor. Enrollment limited. 

268b AFRICAN POLITICS Mr. Glickman 

Organization, distribution, aims and uses of power in selected areas of 
tropical and southern Africa today. Prerequisite: Political Science 151a or 
152b or consent of the instructor. Enrollment limited. 
Offered in 1972-73 and alternate years. 

272b THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY PHILOSOPHES 

{Also called French Civilization 242b.) 
Not offered in 1970-71. 

301a LAW AND SOCIETY Miss Leighton 

An introduction to the nature of legal obhgation and its relation to selected 
social institutions. Typical legal problems pertaining to the family, poverty, 
and government are discussed. 
Offered at Bryn Mawr. 

141 



304b WEST EUROPEAN INTEGRATION Mr. Frye 

An analysis of postwar moves toward integration in Western Europe, with 
special emphasis upon the factors behind integration and upon the impact 
of integration upon member societies. 
Offered at Bryn Mawr, not in 1970-71. 

316b URBAN AFFAIRS Mr. Ross 

Seminar on selected topics in urban politics today. Field work. 
Offered at Bryn Mawr. 

320a POLITICAL MODERNIZATION IN BRITAIN AND JAPAN 

Mr. Steslicke 
A critical examination of the concept "'political modernization" and a survey 
of the relevant scholarly literature with particular reference to the experience 
of Britain and Japan during the past century. 
Offered at Bryn Mawr. 

351a COMPARATIVE POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY Mr. Glickman 

Explorations in general political and social theory: problems of authority, 
conflict, participation, integration and development. Emphasis on writings of 
major social theorists and experiences of selected political systems in the 
19th and 20th centuries. Prerequisite: Political Science 151a or 152b or 
consent of the instructor. Enrollment limited. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

352b INTERNATIONAL POLITICS OF COMMUNISM Mr. Hansen 

Examination of some of the major dimensions of international politics as 
practiced between Communist powers, and between Communist and non- 
Communist states. The influence of differing ideological perspectives such as 
Titoism, Maoism and Castroism will be explored, as well as common per- 
spectives derived from various historical forms of Marxism. Illustrative case 
studies from the relations of the Soviet Union with the Arab states, Yugo- 
slavia and China. Prerequisite: Political Science 151a or 152b or consent of 
the instructor. Enrollment limited. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

354b LAW AND POLITICS Mr. Levin 

An investigation of the relationship between law and politics in order to 
discover how political power is exercised in the legal system. Consideration 
of legal and political theory, the legal process and historic and contemporary 
case studies. Distinguished visitors. Prerf^quisite: Political Science 151a or 
152b or consent of the instructor. Limited enrollment, with preference to 
Political Science majors. 

355a MATHEMATICS OF POLITICAL AND SOCIAL CONFLICT 

Mr. Krauze 

Introduction to mathematical models of political phenomena. Consideration 
of voting behavior, coalition-formation, collective decision-making and the 
strategy of conflict. No prerequisites; acquaintance with mathematical reason- 
ing desirable. Limited enrollment. 
Not open to freshmen. 

142 



357a RESEARCH SEMINAR IN POLITICAL ANTHROPOLOGY 

(See Sociology 357a) 

371a, 372b POLITICAL ANALYSIS: ASSOCIATION IN TEACHING Staff 
Student association with staff in Political Science 151a, 152b or, sometimes, 
in other 100-level Political Science courses. Open to selected senior majors 
only. 

391a SENIOR SEMINAR IN POLITICAL STUDIES 

Staff and Special Examiner 
Main themes in contemporary political thought and analysis. Discussions, 
papers, culminating in senior general examination. 

392b RESEARCH AND WRITING ON POLITICAL PROBLEMS Staff 

Tutorials, research projects, culminating in a senior thesis. 
Open to Political Science seniors only. 

48 If, 482i INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

Individual consultation; supervised independent reading and research 
Research papers and oral reports on special topics based upon the individual 
interests of advanced students. Enrollment only by permission of the in- 
structor. 

483a, 484b TOPICS IN POLITICAL THEORY AND ANALYSIS Staff 

Student-organized and student-conducted courses, with faculty supervision. 
Topics chosen in the past: Student Rebellions; Conflict Theory, Strategy, 
and Political Gaming. Minimum group of eight students and consent of the 
Chairman of the Political Science Department required. Prerequisite: two 
courses in Political Science. Registration one time only. 



143 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Professor Sidney I. Perloe, Chairman 

Professor Douglas H. Heath** 

Associate Professor Thomas D'Andrea 

Assistant Professor Preston B. Rowe, Jr. 

The Psychology curriculum consists of three levels of courses and a 
special Senior Program. The first or general level includes courses 
which aim at providing students with the experience of how psychol- 
ogists use their knowledge and skills to understand issues of con- 
temporary concern. Although the courses will not attempt to survey 
the field, it is hoped that the examination of a few problems in some 
depth and the carrying out of research projects will also allow the 
student to encounter methods and concepts in related areas of the 
discipline. The second, intermediate level courses are oriented primarily 
toward the systematic treatment of basic concepts, methods and data 
in four broad areas of psychology. Advanced courses focus in greater 
detail and with greater sophistication on topics drawn from the areas 
covered at the second level. Several of the second and third level 
courses carry practicums which involve the student in experiments and 
field observation. The senior program is described below. Students are 
encouraged to examine the program of the Bryn Mawr Psychology 
Department for additional courses. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

The major program will include the following intermediate courses: 223a, 
Personality Theory; 130b, Animal Learning and Ethology; 136b, Social Psychology; 
and 235a, Perception and Cognition. Psychology 351a, Research Topics in Psy- 
chology, may be substituted for one of the intermediate courses carrying an 
associated practicum. Psychology 153d, e, g, the Social Science Statistics half- 
course, will normally be taken along with one of the intermediate level courses. 
Maiors will also be expected to take two advanced courses (other than 480) as 
well as the Senior Program. The advanced courses may be taken at Haverford or 
Bryn Mawr. Students expecting to go on to graduate school in Psychology should 
take Psychology 351a. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

The award of Departmental Honors signifies that a student has maintained a 
consistently high standard of performance in the work of his major program, and 
has done distinguished work on an independent empirical research project as 
well as in the Senior Program. Honors candidates should plan to take Psychology 
351a during the senior year; they may also be given an oral examination. 



■=On leave, second semester, 1970-71. 

144 



GENERAL COURSES T1 

These courses are intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores. Normally, JU 
students will take only one general course, but additional courses may be taken 
for credit with the permission of the instructor. 



■< 

n 



012b AGGRESSION Mr. Perloe 

A consideration of the physiological, behavioral and social determinants of 
aggression as it occurs in lower animals, normal and pathological humans, and Q 
in relations among groups. Basic psychological concepts from a variety of 
areas will be introduced throughout the course to provide a general view of 



r 



how psychologists approach the study of behavior and experience. Regular Q 
class meeting will be supplemented by small discussion and project groups. « 
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 25. "' 

015a CONTEMPORARY PSYCHOLOGICAL TOPICS: ALIENATION AND "^ 
THE EDUCATIONAL PROCESS Mr. Heath 

The course has two purposes: fl) to provide students with the experience of 
how psychologists use their knowledge and skills to understand issues of 
contemporary concern. We will begin by canvassing the meanings of aliena- 
tion, identifying and examining in some depth the psychological assumptions 
involved, and designing and conducting research about selected aspects of 
alienation. Subsequent topics of study will be determined by the class and 
might include racial differences in intelligence, the effects of the mass media, 
technology and leisure on personality development. (2) To explore different 
types of educational procedures that may reduce alienation and facilitate 
educational involvement. Members of the seminar will share in the teaching 
and evaluation processes of the course. Enrollment limited to 20 freshmen. 

018a,b GAMES, DECISIONS AND ACTIONS Mr. Rowe 

An analysis of how a psychologist studies processes of thinking and acting. 
Students will begin by examining both subjective and objective features of 
their own problem-solving behavior. Various theoretical positions concerning 
thinking will then be considered. In the second part of the course, the student 
will again provide himself with data concerning his participation and decisions 
while playing games and solving problems within a group. Some attention 
will be paid to such variables as trust, threat and competition. The student 
will be guided to achieve some synthesis of his course work by considering 
the variety of factors entering his decisions for action and the relationship 
between knowledge and action based upon it. No prerequisite. Enrollment 
limited to 25. 

INTERMEDIATE COURSES 

121a THE INDIVIDUAL IN SOCIETY Mr. Perloe 

A consideration of the forces operating on individuals by virtue of their 
participation in groups and larger social structures. Topics to be covered are: 
the determinants of group cohesiveness, social influence and conformity, 
crowds, role theory and role conflict, the impact of social systems and cul- 
ture on personality and the relation between psychology and ethics. No 
prerequisite. 
Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

145 



130b ANIMAL LEARNING AND ETHOLOGY Mr. D'Andrea 

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory 

A study of the controlled laboratory investigation of learning and condition- 
ing of animals and the ethological approach to animal behavior. Theories of 
learning will be critically examined in view of experimental and naturalistic 
observations of animal behavior. Students will do experimental work in the 
animal laboratory and write an ethogram based on some naturalistic observa- 
tion of a species. Prerequisite: Psychology 153d,e,g, the Social Science Sta- 
tistics which may be taken concurrently, or permission of the instructor. 

136b SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY Mr. Perloe 

Three hours of lecture and three hours of research 

A study of the perceptual, motivational and learning processes involved in 
social behavior. Topics to be considered are: the judgment of social stimuli, 
forming impressions of other people, evaluating one's abilities, opinions and 
emotions, social exchange, achievement and failure motivation and imitation. 
A research practicum will accompany the course. Prerequisite: Psychology 
153d, e, g, the Social Science Statistics, or permission of the instructor. 

153d,e,g SOCIAL SCIENCE STATISTICS Staff 

{See General Courses 153d,e,g) 

201a COMPARATIVE PSYCHOLOGY Mr. Gonzalez 

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory 

The evolution of behavior: sensory and motor capacities, instinctive activities, 
motivation, learning, group processes, social behavior. Prerequisite: Psy- 
chology 130b. 
Offered at Bryn Mawr. 

201b ANIMAL LEARNING Mr. Gonzalez 

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory 

Comparative studies of conditioning and selective learning; theories of 
learning; the evolution of intelligence. Prerequisite: Psychology 130b. 
Offered at Bryn Mawr. 

202a MOTIVATION Messrs. Hoffman and Gonzalez 

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory 

The activation and regulation of goal-directed behavior: affectional processes, 
psychological drives, incentives, frustration, conflict, punishment, and anxiety. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 130b. 
Offered at Bryn Mawr in 1971-72 and thereafter. 

llZa. THEORIES OF PERSONALITY Mr. Heath 

Although the course will cover the major personality theorists, it will go 
most intensively into Freudian, Rogerian, and existentialist views of per- 
sonality. Reading in original sources will be extensive. Emphasis will be 
placed on mastering the theoretical concepts and relationships. Research 
issues and methods associated with each theoretical approach will be high- 
lighted. The course material will be supplemented by case study material and 

146 



the opportunity to do a minor research project in lieu of a major paper. 
Prerequisite: One course in psychology or the permission of the instructor. 
Enrollment limited to 30. 

235a PERCEPTION AND COGNITION Mr. Rowe 

Evidence and hypotheses in psychology concerning the way we represent our 
environments. Topics will include the act of perceiving, visual and auditory 
memories, categorization and hypothesis testing in representation processes, 
and computer simulation of perception and cognition. In the second part of 
the course students will work together on a research project practicum in 
the areas of perception, conceptuaHzation, or problem solving. Option: Those 
students who do not choose to take the research practicum part of this course 
may elect instead to participate in Psychology 34 le. Prerequisite: Psychology 
153d, e, g, which may be taken concurrently, or permission of the instructor. 
Not open to freshmen. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

238b PSYCHOLOGY OF LANGUAGE Mr. D'Andrea 

The course will concentrate on the development of modem psycholinguistics. 
Such topics as semantics, the interpretation of language in terms of associa- 
tion theories, the relation between language and thinking, and the implica- 
tions of recent work in generative grammars for a psychology of language 
will be discussed. Students will have the opportunity to pursue their particular 
interests, whether they be in the philosophical or mathematical theories of 
language, in culture and language, or in more conventional linguistics. Pre- 
requisite: One general course in Psychology or permission of the instructor. 

ADVANCED COURSES 

301a PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY Mr. Thomas 

Three hours of lecture and one laboratory period 

An examination of the physiological basis of a wide range of psychological 
phenomena, including the role of the nervous system in learning, emotion, 
motivation, perception and thought. Prerequisite: Psychology 130b. Students 
wishing to take part in the laboratory must secure permission of the instructor. 
Offered at Bryn Mawr. 

307a SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY OF ATTITUDES Mr. Perloe 

Three hours of seminar and three hours of research 

A detailed coverage of recent psychological research on the determinants of 
attitude formation and change. After examining the personal and social 
sources of attitudes, the course will turn to a consideration of the effects of 
the following variables upon attitude change: the nature of the communicator, 
the use of emotional appeals, the structure of persuasive communications, 
the personalities of communication recipients, and the occurrence of incon- 
sistencies between communication and action. The consequences of gross 
situational changes such as "brain washing" will also be discussed. A research 
practicum will accompany the course. Prerequisite: One intermediate course 
in Psychology or permission of the instructor; Psychology 153d, e, g 
strongly recommended. 

147 



b 



340b MATHEMATICAL THINKING PSYCHOLOGY Mr. Rowe 

The first part of the course will cover mathematical models of psychological 
processes, theory construction, and various mathematical tools such as 
information theory, utihty theory, logic and set theory, and theory of re- 
lations and graphs. The second part of the course will consider the human as 
a decision-making system. Topics will include models of control systems 
within the individual, brain decisions, the will and the mind, and control by 
symbol systems. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

341e BRAIN, BEHAVIOR, AND EXPERIENCE {V2 credit) Mr. Rowe 

An introduction to some of the recent neurophysiological evidence and 
theorizing about brain function and states as they relate to psychological 
constructs such as percepts, images, emotions, intention, choice, and attention. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or one intermediate course, which 
may be taken concurrently. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

344b DEVELOPMENT THROUGH THE LIFE SPAN Mr. Heath 

Developmental problems of infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood 
will be viewed from different perspectives, including psychosexual, Erikson's 
psychosocial and Piaget's cognitive theories. Emphasis will be placed on the 
healthy mastery of problems like sexuality, identity, responsibility, marriage, 
religion, and death. There will be a weekly practicum experience with children 
in a local nursery or elementary school. Student reports, discussion, and 
occasional lectures will be supplemented by demonstrations, some role- 
playing, and other experiential forms of learning. Prerequisite: Psychology 
223a and permission of the instructor. 

345a ANALYSIS OF BEHAVIOR Mr. D'Andrea 

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratoiy 

The course systematically formulates and analyzes the problems of scientific 
method, learning, motivation, and emotion, in terms of the principles of 
operant conditioning. Detailed analysis will be made of such problems as 
primary and conditioned reinforcement, reinforcement schedules, and avoid- 
ance conditioning. Lectures will emphasize the systematic principles and their 
application to a variety of human behaviors. The laboratory will involve the 
study of an individual animal's behavior (e.g., acquisition, extinction, dis- 
crimination). Students will also do independent research projects. Prerequi- 
site: Psychology 130b or permission of the instructor. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

346b ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY Mr. Heath 

Three hours of seminar and three hours of fieldwork 

The course has two purposes: 1) to introduce a student to the principal 
forms of psychopathology and deviancy, etiological controversies, methods of 
personality assessment and therapy, and the meaning of abnormality and its 
relation to socio-cultural values; 2) to sensitize a student to the subtleties of 

148 



interpersonal dynamics as they are related to understanding psychopathology. 
Intensive case analyses, work with a hospitalized patient, and guided experi- 
ential encounters with others will supplement the formal course work. Field- 
work will be at a neighboring mental hospital. Prerequisite: Psychology 
223a and permission of the instructor. 

351a RESEARCH TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY Staff 

This course will involve students, at an advanced level, in the problems of 
hypothesis formation and definition, experimental design, data analysis, and 
report writing by means of closely supervised experimental research projects. 
Students must have selected the problem on which they wish to work during 
the spring of the previous year. They may enroll in Psychology 480 for half- 
credit as a means of preparing for their research project. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of the instructor under whom one intends to work. 

480 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

Students should normally plan to take this course for half-credit. 

399 THE SENIOR PROGRAM 

The senior program is designed to build upon the systematic basis established 
at the intermediate level and to help the student gain an overview of the 
theoretical and applied aspects of psychology. It also aims at increasing the 
understanding of the processes through which psychological knowledge is 
accumulated and the methods by which it can be communicated to non- 
psychologists. The program has three aspects. The first is a series of case 
studies of problems drawn from all areas of the discipline, with particular 
emphasis placed on the ways in which problems and concepts have developed. 
The second is a series of visitors, each of whom will meet intensively with the 
seniors. Most of the visitors will be chosen because of their involvement with 
the problems treated in the case studies. The selection of cases and visitors 
will be based in part upon the suggestions made by majors toward the end 
of the junior year. The third aspect of the program provides an opportunity 
for students to participate in communicating psychology and supervising 
student research in general and intermediate courses. Grades of 70 or above 
in each semester of the program will satisfy the senior comprehensive 
requirement. 



149 



RELIGION 

Associate Professor Richard G. Luman, Chairman 

Professor Gerhard E. Spiegler 

Assistant Professor J. Bruce Long 

Assistant Professor Craig L. Stark 

Lecturer Samuel T. Lachs 

At Bryn Mawr College 
Professor Howard C. Kee 

The Department of Religion is concerned with the historical study of 
religious tradition in the Judeo-Christian-Islamic West; with the his- 
torical-phenomenological study of archaic, ancient and classical, and 
non-Western religious traditions; and with the philosophical study of 
religious thought, East and West, particularly in its modem forms of 
expression. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

The exact structure of the student's program must be determined in consulta- 
tion with the major adviser (who is chosen by the student from among the 
regular members of the Department) together with the advice of the entire 
Department. The program must include the following courses: 

a. Religion 101a or b, 102a or b, and 399b. 

b. Six additional half-year courses. Two of these courses may be upper-level 
courses in other departments, including languages. Also among the six 
courses must be one of the following sequences: Religion 103a, 104a; 117a, 
118b; 201a, 202b; 225a, 226b, or any year sequence on the scriptures and 
sources of a major religious tradition. 

Each student's program and record will be reviewed annually by the Department. 

Final evaluation of the major program will consist of written and oral exami- 
nations to be administered during the senior year in the context of the work for 
Religion 399b. Specific terms of the synthesis will be reviewed with the majors 
and members of the Department. 

Where necessary for the major program, the Department urges the study of 
the appropriate foreign language (s). 

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

Honors in Religion are awarded on the basis of the oral part of the senior 
evaluation of students whose written work as juniors and seniors has been of a 
consistently high standard. High Honors are awarded on the same basis, special 
consideration being given to work done in project courses. 

101 a,b RELIGION IN TRADITIONAL CULTURE Messrs. Long and Luman 
A study of man's conceptions of himself and society through detailed ex- 
amination of selected myths and rites, found in the traditions of tribal 
Africa, Vedic India, or the Ancient Near East. An introduction to and 

150 



z 



testing of divergent methodologies and theories of religion in the study of TB 

major religious forms and types developed in the Hebrevz-Christian jji 

tradition. Limit: 20 students in each section. iTl 

One-semester course offered in each semester. I 

102a,b RELIGION IN MODERN CULTURE Messrs. Spiegler and Stark Q 

Modern forms of religious expression and critiques of religion will be ■■ 
studied in the work of such men as Kierkegaard, Marx, Freud, T. S. Eliot, Q 
Buber, Bultmann, Tillich, and Camus. No prerequisite. Limit: 20 students in 
each section. 
One-semester course offered in each semester. 

103a, 104a BIBLICAL HISTORY AND LITERATURE Mr. Kee 

Offered at Bryn Mawr as History of Religion 103 

117a, 118b HISTORY OF JEWISH THOUGHT Mr. Lachs 

A systematic survey of the development of Jewish thought from the period of 
the Bible to the present. Fall semester: From the Biblical period to the end 
of the 15th century. Spring semester: From the 16th century to the present. 

119a GREEK CIVILIZATION Mr. Luman 

(Also called History 119a and Classics 119a; for course description see 
History 119a.) 

120b ROMAN CIVILIZATION Mr. Luman 

(Also called History 120b and Classics 120b; for course description see 
History 120b.) 

201a, 202b HISTORY OF WESTERN RELIGIOUS THOUGHT AND 

INSTITUTIONS Mr. Luman 

History of Christian thought and institutions from the first century to the 
fifteenth. Religion 101a, b and 102a, b and/or History 111 desirable. Enroll- 
ment limited to 20 students. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

225a, 226b RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS IN INDIA: ANCIENT AND 

MODERN Mr. Long 

(Also called Philosophy 225a, 226b) 

A study of the various religious traditions in India (Hindu, Buddhist, Islamic, 
and tribal) from the earliest developments in the Vedas, Brahmanas, and 
Upanishads, through the two Indian epics, the Puranas, and the Agamas. 
Special emphasis will be placed upon tracing the persistence of certain forms 
of religious belief and worship throughout the course of Indian history. 
Prerequisite: Religion 101a or b or consent of the instructor. 

229a RELIGION AND THE CONTEMPORARY IMAGINATION Mr. Long 
(Also called Philosophy 229a) 

An introductory study of the basic ideas and issues in contemporary theology 
and literature, designed to help the student bring into sharper focus the 
religious dimensions or implications of modern literature — fiction, drama, 
and poetry. Lectures and discussions will be devoted to close literary analysis 

151 



and theological interpretation of selected works of Kafka, Sartre, Camus, 
Beckett, Auden, Eliot, Kierkegaard, Tillich, and others. Prerequisite: Religion 
102a or b or consent of the instructor. 
Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

236b THE PROTESTANT REFORMATION Mr. Luman 

(Also called History 236b) 

A study of the rise and development of the Protestant Reformation during 
the sixteenth century, its history and thought, with special attention to the 
work and thought of Luther and Calvin. Prerequisites: Consent of the in- 
structor, and either Religion 101a or b and 102a or b or History 111. 

240b HISTORY AND PRINCIPLES OF QUAKERISM Mr. Bronner 

(See History 240b) 

326a MYSTICISM: EAST AND WEST Mr. Long 

An investigation into the more central traits of religious and secular mys- 
ticism in the history of religions. Readings will be drawn from the following 
traditions: Hindu (Upanishads, Patanjali, Sahkara and Aurobindo), Islamic 
(various Sufi poets), Judaic (Kabbalah), and Christian (Meister Eckhart, 
St. John of the Cross, and George Fox). Prerequisite: Consent of the instruc- 
tor. Enrollment limited. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

337a RELIGIOUS ETHICS Mr. Stark 

(Also called Philosophy 337a) 

An examination of conflicting approaches to such topics as freedom and 
order, love and justice, vocation and avocation, church and state, just-war 
theory and nonviolent resistance, population control, and personal responsi- 
bility in the uses of power. Reports, lectures, and discussions. Prerequisite: 
Religion 102a or b or consent of the instructor. Enrollment limited. 

338a PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION Mr. Stark 

(Also called Philosophy 338a) 

A study of classical and contemporary treatments of such topics as faith and 
knowledge, theology and history, science and religion, the nature and exist- 
ence of God, evil and life after death, and problems concerning truth-claims 
and meaningfulness in religious discourse. Lectures, reports, and class dis- 
cussions. Prerequisite: Religion 102a or b or one course in Philosophy. 

343a SEMINAR IN RELIGIOUS THOUGHT Messrs. Spiegler and Stark 

(Also called Philosophy 343a) 

Specialized study of the works of some major philosopher or theologian, or 
work on a major theological problem. May be repeated for credit with change 
of content. Fall semester 1970-71: Hegel (Messrs. Spiegler and Bernstein). 
Prerequisite: reading knowledge of German or French and consent of the in- 
structor. 



152 



i 



350b SEMINAR IN HISTORY OF RELIGIONS Mr. Long 

Intensive study of some period or set of problems in the field. Topic for 
1970-71: Mythologies of Death and the Afterlife. Prerequisite: Consent of 
the instructor. 

345a SEMINAR IN WESTERN RELIGIOUS HISTORY Mr. Luman 

(Also called History 345a) 

Intensive study of a major thinker or movement in the history of Chris- 
tianity. May be repeated for credit with change of content. Prerequisite: 
consent of the instructor. 
Not offered in 1970-71. 

355a ANTHROPOLOGY OF RELIGION Mr. MacGaffey 

(See Sociology 355a) 

399b MODERN TRENDS IN RELIGION Staff 

Advanced study of topics in the field. Required of senior majors and open 
to other qualified seniors with consent of the instructor. 

480a,b INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

Individual consultation; independent reading and research. 



OFFERED UNDER HISTORY OF RELIGION AT BRYN MAWR 

001 ELEMENTARY HEBREW _ Mr. Lachs 

103 BIBLICAL HISTORY AND LITERATURE Mr. Kee 

207a THE HISTORICAL lESUS AND THE GOSPEL TRADITION Mr. Kee 

208b PAUL AND THE RISE OF GENTILE CHRISTIANITY Mr. Kee 

303a READINGS IN THE GREEK NEW TESTAMENT Mr. Kee 

303b MYTH AND HISTORY: A STUDY OF THE GOSPEL OF JOHN, ITS 
SOURCES, ITS USE OF JEWISH, HELLENISTIC, AND GNOSTIC 
CONCEPTS Mr. Kee 



153 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

Professor Marcel M. Gutwirth, Chairman 

Professor Manuel J. Asensio 

Associate Professor Bradford Cook 

Assistant Professor Patrick McCarthy 

Admission of new students to all French and Spanish courses except 
French 001 and Spanish 001 is contingent upon placement examinations 
administered by the Department prior to the opening of such courses. 

Students who complete French 001, Spanish 001 or Spanish 003 with 
distinction are given opportunity to advance rapidly into higher courses 
by passing a special examination in September on a prescribed program 
of vacation study. 

Residence in the French and Spanish Houses and participation in 
the Cercle Frangais and Club Espaiiol afford an opportunity for sup- 
plementary oral practice. 

Students who might profitably spend their junior year in France or 
Spain are encouraged by the Department to apply for admission to the 
institutions sponsoring foreign study groups. 

Students majoring in a Romance language are encouraged to spend a 
summer in France or in a Spanish-speaking country. Foreign summer 
schools and projects sponsored by the American Friends Service Com- 
mittee and other organizations offer exceptional opportunities in this 
regard. 

FRENCH 



The program in French is designed to give the student some facility 
in handling the French language, by elucidation and review of funda- 
mentals, by a progressive course of reading, and constant practice in 
hearing, speaking, and writing French. Close scrutiny of style and 
structure, of moral and artistic intentions, orients the study of the 
masterpieces of French literature, which the student is then ready to 
approach, toward a heightening of his perception of artistic achieve- 
ment, an enlargement of his understanding of both heart and mind. 
Reading in the original of the works of major figures such as Pascal, 
MoHere, Balzac, Flaubert, Proust, moreover, will perfect his acquaint- 
ance with some of the best in his own heritage, the culture of the West. 

154 



MAJOR REQUIREMENTS Jl 

French 202a, 202b, 203a, 203b, 301a, 301b, and 490b. Q 

Supporting courses to be arranged in individual conference with the major ^ 



supervisor. 

Comprehensive examination. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 



> 

2 


Honors in French will be awarded on the basis of consistently distinguished Pfj 
work in the literature courses — including at least one project course — and of 

a grade of 90 or better on the comprehensive examinations. High Honors will j^ 

be determined by a further oral examination. W 

001 INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH LANGUAGE AND THOUGHT ^ 

Staff ^ 

Pronunciation and intonation; grammar, with oral and written exercises. Ul 

Reading, in the second semester, of easy texts of literary merit. f 

This course is not open to freshmen who have had more than two years J" 

of high-school French. P 

101 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH Staff C) 

Training in the language is pursued on the basis of a sampling of works ni 

designed to acquaint the student with the range of French thought and in 

letters, from Francois Villon to the present. Grammar review, dictees, short *' 
written compositions, classes conducted in French. Prerequisite: French 001 
or satisfactory performance on a placement test. 

201a DICTION AND COMPOSITION IN FRENCH Mr. McCarthy 

Intensive language work in a small class. Grammar review, compositions, 
pronunciation drill, oral reports. The work will be centered on literary 
topics (e.g., the contemporary theatre), but the emphasis will be on perfect- 
ing linguistic performance. Prerequisite: permission of the Department. 

201b EXPLICATION DE TEXTES Mr. McCarthy 

An introduction to the study of French literature by the method of intensive 
analysis of style and structure applied to the several genres. Prose and poetry, 
essay and fiction drawn from a variety of periods will come under scrutiny. 
Prerequisite: French 201a or the equivalent. 

202a THE CLASSICAL AGE 

Reading in the French 17th century, from Pascal's Pensees to La Bruyere's 
Caracteres, with special attention to the flowering of the classical drama. 
Prerequisite: French 201b or the equivalent. 
Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

202b THE TWENTIETH CENTURY 

Three generations, those of Gide, Malraux, and Sartre, will be examined 
in representative novels, plays, essays, and poems. Prerequisite: French 201b 
or the equivalent. 
Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

155 



203a NINETEENTH CENTURY LYRIC POETRY Mr. Cook 

The lyrical rebirth of the 19th century: Vigny, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, 
Mallarme. Prerequisite: French 201b or the equivalent. 
Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

203b THE NOVEL FROM LACLOS TO PROUST Mr. Gutwirth 

The rise of the modern novel in France from the late 18th to the early 20th 
century with particular attention to Balzac, Stendhal, Flaubert, Zola, and 
Proust. Prerequisite: French 201b or the equivalent. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

301a ADVANCED TOPICS IN FRENCH LITERATURE Mr. Gutwirth 

1970-71: Rabelais. A close reading of the first four books of the Gargantua 
and Pantagruel adventures in light of recent views concerning the humanist 
movement, verbal exuberance, and the comic spirit. Prerequisite: consent of 
the instructor. 

301b ADVANCED TOPICS IN FRENCH LITERATURE Mr. Cook 

1970-71: Flaubert, Mallarme. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

480a,b INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

This course offers the student of French literature an opportunity to probe 
more deeply and more independently into a problem or into an area in 
which he is particularly interested. The nature of the course will therefore 
vary to suit the needs of the individual student. 

490b SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES Staff 

Masterworks from the Renaissance to the present. A representative sample 
of major works by twelve writers of the first rank is assigned in this course, 
together with a recent scholarly appraisal of each writer, to allow the 
student to form a view of the high points of the literary tradition against 
a background of authoritative, up-to-date assessment. From Montaigne 
to Proust the readings cover a span of four centuries, and they range 
from Voltaire's polemic wit to Baudelaire's aesthetic detachment. The 
object of the course is to cap the student's acquaintance with French litera- 
ture by a reconsideration of some of its main achievements. Among the 
writers presented are: Pascal, Moliere, Racine, Flaubert, Gide. Prerequisite: 
senior standing or permission of the Department. 



FRENCH CIVILIZATION 

241a THE IMPRESSIONIST ERA Mr. McCarthy 

(Also called History 241a) 

A study of late 19th century French civilization: painting, literature and 
history. Examination of the Impressionist and post-Impressionist painters 
(with slides and guest lectures). Readings from Flaubert, Zola, Maupassant 
and the poets. Study of selected topics from the history of the Third Republic. 
Particular attention will be paid to the links among the various cultural and 
social phenomena. A knowledge of French is not required. 

156 



242b THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY PHILOSOPHES 

(Also called Political Science 272b) 

Montesquieu, Voltaire, Rousseau, Diderot. Readings in English from the 

works of these four major figures of the European Enlightenment, whose 

contribution to sociology, political theory, and theory of education singularly 

broadened the idea of the writer's function in society. Some attention will 

also be given to Helvetius, Condillac, and the Encyclopedie. 

Not offered in 1970-71. 

243b CONTEMPORARY FRANCE Mr. McCarthy 

(Also called History 243b) 

An examination of the main political, social and cultural trends of con- 
temporary France. Selected topics in French history from 1940 to the May 
riots and the resignation of De Gaulle. Discussion of cun^ent events. Study 
of the structure of French family life, of the educational system, etc. Read- 
ings from such authors as Celine, Camus, Sartre, Robbe-Grillet and Cayrol. 
A knowledge of French is desirable but not required. 

COURSES OFFERED AT BRYN MAWR 

305a BALZAC Mr. Serodes 

305b AUTOBIOGRAPHY: CHATEAUBRIAND TO SARTRE Mr. Maurin 

SPANISH 

The courses offered in Spanish are designed to give the students a 
thorough knowledge of the Spanish language and an understanding of 
Spanish and Spanish-American thought and culture. Elementary Spanish 
and Intermediate Spanish are primarily language courses, with emphasis 
on grammar, reading, and conversation. Even in these elementary 
courses the approach corresponds to the liberal tradition of the College, 
placing emphasis on the human value of the language, and its impor- 
tance in international and continental solidarity and understanding. The 
elementary courses are followed by general courses in civilization and 
literature, as the basis for the more advanced courses covering special 
periods, works, and authors in Spanish and Spanish-American litera- 
tures. Interested students should consider, in addition to the courses 
listed below, the offerings in Spanish at Bryn Mawr College. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

Spanish 101, 201, 303a, 401a or 401b, 490. 

Histoiy of Spain and Spanish America, as a background for literature. 
Supporting courses to be arranged in individual conference with the major 
supervisor. 

Comprehensive examination. 

Spanish majors are advised to take Spanish 202 (Spanish Readings and Com- 
position) at Bryn Mawr College. 

157 



REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

Honors in Spanish are awarded to students who consistently show high-quality 
work in their literature courses and undertake study beyond the normal require- 
ments. Every Honors student must complete at least one project course. A 
minimum grade of 88 is required in the comprehensive examinations. High Honors 
are awarded on the basis of a further oral examination. 

001 ELEMENTARY SPANISH Mr. Asensio 

Grammar, with written and oral exercises; reading; thorough drill in con- 
versation. 

003 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH Mr. Asensio 

Review of grammar, with written and oral exercises; composition, reading, 
and conversation. Prerequisite: Spanish 001 or the equivalent. 

101 INTRODUCTION TO SPANISH LITERATURE Mr. Asensio 

A survey of Spanish literature from the beginnings to modern times; lectures, 
written and oral reports. Prerequisite: Spanish 003 or the equivalent. 

201 INTRODUCTION TO LATIN-AMERICAN LITERATURE Mr. Asensio 

A survey of Latin-American literature from the Colonial period to modern 

times; lectures, written and oral reports. Prerequisite: Spanish 003 or the 

equivalent. 

Not offered in 1970-71. 

203 INTRODUCTION TO HISPANIC CIVILIZATION Mr. Asensio 

Geographic, cultural, and historical background. Emphasis is laid on basic 
attitudes underlying the Spanish and Spanish-American culture pattern and 
contrasting with characteristic American attitudes. Lectures, reading, discus- 
sion, written reports. Prerequisite: Spanish 003 or the equivalent. 
Not offered in 1970-71. 

303a THE AGE OF CERVANTES Mr. Asensio 

The development of Cervantes' art in the drama, the short story, and the 
novel with special attention to Don Quixote. 

301a, 301b SPECIAL TOPICS IN SPANISH LITERATURE Mr. Asensio 

Reading and lectures, written and oral reports. This course may be repeated, 
with change of content, for full credit. 

401a INDEPENDENT STUDY Mr. Asensio 

490 SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES Mr. Asensio 



158 



RUSSIAN JJ 

Professor F.^.CHSoeGKA.PP,C..>.«„« g 

Instructor Frederick Schulze iL 

At Bryn Mawr College _ 

Associate Professor Ruth C. Pearce y 

2 

The courses in Russian are designed to offer the students the oppor- 
tunity to learn to read and speak Russian and to achieve an under- 
standing of the thought and culture of pre-revolutionary as well as 
contemporary Russia. Russian 001 and 101 are primarily language 
courses. The elementary course teaches the basic grammar and enough 
vocabulary to enable the student to speak and understand simple Rus- 
sian. The intermediate course introduces the student to the Russian 
literary language; also some newspaper articles and other contemporary 
material are read. 

Students who have completed Russian 101 can continue with the 
more advanced courses offered at Bryn Mawr College. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

(Courses numbered above 200 are offered at Bryn Mawr College). Students 
majoring in this field will be required to take: Eight semester courses in Russian 
language and literature: 001, 101, 200 or 201, a 300-level course, either 302 or 
303 in addition to the Comprehensive Conference. 

Three semester courses in Russian history and institutions: History 244 (Rus- 
sian History); Political Science 210a (The Soviet System). Other related courses, 
including Russian 200 (Advanced Training in the Russian language), and Russian 
203 (Russian Literature in Translation), are recommended. 

A comprehensive examination in the Russian language and a special period of 
Russian literature. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

Honors in Russian will be awarded on the basis of consistently high quality 
work in literature, and a research paper. High Honors will be awarded on the 
basis of further oral examination. 

001 ELEMENTARY RUSSIAN Mr. Schulze 

Five periods a week 
j Russian grammar, conversation and reading. This course meets five times a 
I week with corresponding reduction in outside preparation; three hours credit. 

|*0n sabbatical leave first semester, 1970-71. 

159 



101 INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN Mrs. Pearce 

Four periods a week 

Grammar review, reading in Russian classics and contemporary materials, 
conversation; three hours credit. Prerequisite: a grade of 70 or higher in 
Russian 001, or the equivalent. 

490 COMPREHENSIVE CONFERENCE 

COURSES OFFERED AT BRYN MAWR 

200 ADVANCED TRAINING IN THE RUSSIAN LANGUAGE Mr. Segall 

201 READINGS IN RUSSIAN LITERATURE Miss Nagurski 

203 RUSSIAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION Miss Nagurski 

Not offered in 1970-71. 

302 PUSHKIN AND HIS TIME Mrs. O'Connor, Miss de Graaff 

303 RUSSIAN LITERATURE OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY 

Miss de Graaff 



SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 

Associate Professor Wyatt MacGaffey, Chairman'^** 

Assistant Professor William Hohenstein, Acting Chairman 

Professor A. Paul Hare 

Lecturer Laura BLANKERTZf 

Lecturer Paul E. Wehr 

Sociology at Bryn Mawr 

Professor Eugene V. Schneider 

Sociology courses at Bryn Mawr and Haverford are intended to be 
complementary. Students interested in sociology should consult the Bryn 
Mawr College calendar. 

A student majoring in sociology selects a member of the full-time 
staff as his adviser and develops a program of study acceptable to the 
adviser as fulfilling the college's general educational aims and as includ- 
ing a coherent and relatively intensive exploration in the discipline of 
sociology. The department expects such a program to lead to an under- 
standing of past and present theories of social behavior, of their appli- 
cation to concrete examples of interpersonal relations, institutional 
structure, social conflict and change, and of the methods of sociological j 

='=**0n sabbatical leave, 1970-71. ' 

tOn appointment first semester 1970-71. 

160 



research. As soon as possible in his work in this Department the student yj 
should take at least the first part of the elementary methods course, « 
Sociology 153d, e, g. In their senior year, all majors participate in the 
Departmental Studies, Sociology 450b. Programs will include appropri- 



n 



ate courses from other departments such as languages, psychology, Q 

biology and philosophy. A brief written explanation of each student's |. 

program becomes part of the student's advising file, copies bemg sent |ii| 

to the chairman of the department and the Associate Dean at the time •• 

of course registration. Each semester, after the results of the previous ul 

semester's work are complete and before registration for the next ^^ 
semester, additions are made to the program in the form of remarks 
on progress and the reason for changes. 

Students intending to specialize in social psychology should see 
Mr. Hare; in institutional analysis and the classical sociological writers, 
Mr. Hohenstein; in social anthropology, Mr. MacGaffey. The attention 
of those interested in anthropology is also drawn to the departmental 
offerings at Bryn Mawr, Swarthmore and the University of Pennsylvania. 
Majors are encouraged to include in their programs a semester's involve- 
ment in one of the off-campus programs offered by the Center for 
Nonviolent Resolution of Conflict. 

Candidates for Honors in sociology and anthropology are expected 
to demonstrate high competence and seriousness of purpose in their 
major courses, to complete a research paper, and to pass the compre- 
hensive review with distinction. 

055a SOCIAL CONFLICT Mr. Wehr 

Various theoretical approaches will be applied to analysis of contemporary 
instances of conflict between groups, organizations and states. The seminar will 
draw heavily on the works of Lorenz, Coser, Boulding, Dahrendorf, Coleman 
and Burton. Enrollment limited to fifteen. Prerequisite: consent of the 
instructor. 

Not offered in 1970-71. 

056b HISTORY AND THEORY OF NONVIOLENCE Mr. Wehr 

An examination of the philosophical and tactical origins of nonviolence, its 
development as a change-oriented ideology, and social movements that have 
developed around it. Thoreau, Tolstoy, Gandhi, King, and certain Quaker 
pacifists are among the authors to be read and related to contemporary non- 
violent movements. Enrollment limited to fifteen. 

121a THE INDIVIDUAL IN SOCIETY Mr. Perloe 

(See Psychology 121a) 

161 



152b AFRICAN SOCIETY Mr. MacGaffey 

An introduction to social anthropology through the study of Subsaharan 
African peoples. Special attention to kinship and economic institutions, re- 
lating patterns of exchange to social structure. Enrollment limited to 30. Not 
open to seniors. 

153d,e,g SOCIAL SCIENCE STATISTICS Staff 

{See General Courses 153d,e,g) 

155a FOUNDATIONS OF SOCIOLOGY Mr. Hohenstein 

An introduction to the key questions addressed by the major figures in the 
sociological traditions. In particular the concepts of freedom, responsibility, 
alienation, class, power, and progress will be examined for their relevance to 
an understanding of contemporary societies. 

159a SOCIOLOGY OF THE FAMILY Mr. Hohenstein 

The course will examine the family as an ongoing social institution. Consid- 
eration will be given to forces such as culture, social class, religion, and 
education which affect family structure. Special attention will be paid to 
changes and conflicts stemming from difficulties in sex and age role-adjust- 
ment. Comparison will be made between the family structures of America 
and Sweden. 

162b ANALYSIS OF INTERPERSONAL BEHAVIOR Mr. Hare 

The aim of the course is to improve the student's abilities to observe, analyze, 
and understand his own behavior and that of others in everyday interpersonal 
situations. The class constitutes a self-analytic training group in which the 
student is expected to demonstrate his abilities by effective participation in 
the group as well as in periodic written analysis. Problems for analysis are 
drawn from events in the group. 

216a AFRICAN CIVILIZATION Messrs. Glickman or Mortimer or MacGaffey 
(See General Courses — Social Science 216a) 

25 la SOCIOLOGY OF CRIME Mr. Hohenstein 

Consideration will be given to: historical overview of criminological theory 
from Lombroso to the present; social class, race, age, and sex as factors in 
crime; the place of statistical and individual case studies in the development 
of theory; and contemporary trends in treating the offender. 

252b SOCIAL CHANGE Mr. Hohenstein 

Major theories of social change current in contemporary sociology will be 
considered. Readings include Marion Levy, Herbert Marcuse, Robert Nisbet, 
Ralf Dahrendorf and Philip Rieff. 

162 



253a SOCIOLOGY OF SMALL GROUPS Mr. Hare 

Theoretical and experimental analysis of the structure and process of inter- 
action in small discussion, therapy, or work groups. The effects of variables 
such as leadership, group size, members' personalities, and the communication 
network will be examined. Class members will conduct and observe experi- 
mental groups in the laboratory and use the computer to simulate observed 
interpersonal behavior. 

254b SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY Mr. MacGaffey 

History, theory and method in social anthropology, showing how funda- 
mental assumptions about human nature and social process affect the collec- 
tion and interpretation of ethnographic data. Outline of fieldwork techniques 
and experiences. Not open to freshmen. 

Students interested in field research practice are invited to take additional 
half-course (480) in a suitable individual program. 

257a DYNAMICS OF NONVIOLENCE Mr. Hare 

A review of social-psychological theories and other theories of nonviolent 
direct action. Class discussion will be based on written case material and 
field observation. 

349a SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY OF ATTITUDES Mr. Perioe 

(See Psychology 349a) 

352b DATA PROCESSING AND COMPUTER TECHNIQUES Mr. Hare 
An advanced course in sociological research methods with emphasis on 
computer processing of survey data. Students learn to write programs in the 
FORTRAN computer language and to use basic computer programs for 
statistical analysis. Problems will include: research design, sampling, scale 
construction, and the use of statistical tests. Data from actual surveys will be 
prepared for the computer and analyzed by members of the class using the 
library of programs at the Computing Center. Prerequisite: Sociology 153d, 
e, g or the equivalent with the permission of the instructor. 

354b SOCIOLOGY OF KNOWLEDGE Mr. Hohenstein 

An analysis of European and American theories of the social factors which 
influence and affect the development of knowledge. Emphasis will be placed 
on the writings of Karl Marx, Emil Durkheim, Karl Mannheim, and Talcott 
Parsons. Particular consideration will be given to the role of the intellectual 
in contemporary America and to the epistemological assumptions behind 
procedural rules in the social sciences. Prerequisite: Sociology 155a, or 
equivalent with permission of the instructor. 
Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

355a ANTHROPOLOGY OF RELIGION Mr. MacGaffey 

(Also called Religion 355a) 
Contemporary ethnographic work in the field of religion considered in 

163 



relation to the most important theoretical contributions, particularly those of 
French authors. A knowledge of French is helpful but not essential. Not open 
to freshmen. 

356b SEMINAR IN SOCIAL THEORY Mr. Hohenstein 

A comparison of the theoretical positions of Karl Marx, Max Weber, and 
Talcott Parsons. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 
Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 



357a POLITICAL ANTHROPOLOGY 

(A Iso called Political Science 357a) 



Mr. MacGaffey 



Selected topics in the comparative study of government and law, including 
insurrectionary phenomena such as revolution, rebellion, and messianism. 



450b SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL STUDIES 

Required of majors in their senior year. 



Staff 



480d, e, g, h INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

Research papers and reading courses on special topics based upon the indi- 
vidual interests of advanced students. Prerequisite: approval of a research or 
reading proposal by the instructor. 



SPANISH 

(See Romance Languages) 



164 



PECIAL PROGRAMS 
OF INSTRUCTION 




FRESHMAN SEMINARS 

EDUCATIONAL INVOLVEMENT 

URBAN STUDIES 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



FRESHMAN SEMINARS 

Administrative Staff 

Professor Edgar S. Rose, Chairman 

Professor Frank J. Quinn 

Associate Dean David Potter 

(See Guidelines for Liberal Education) 

Freshmen will take one seminar each semester, which they will 
choose in consultation with the faculty member teaching the seminar. 
In most cases the professor who teaches it will be the academic adviser 
of the students in the seminar so that the seminar will become the focal 
point of the freshman year from the standpoint of creative advising as 
well as of intellectual exploration. 

Class size is normally limited to twelve students, although there may 
be some experimentation with classes of 24 students and two faculty 
members. 

In addition to group seminar meetings, there will be tutorial sessions 
with smaller groups of students and frequent occasions for writing short 
papers and discussing the work of other students. It is expected that 
there will be an atmosphere in which there is freedom to experiment 
with a variety of educational forms. 

Grading consists of a brief written evaluation. 

The two-year sequence Humanities 101, 102 [see General Courses) 
may be substituted for the Freshman Seminar. 

I-A WE WEAR THE MASK Mr. Aswell 

A study of the ways in which both black and white authors have depicted the 
voluntary and involuntary roles assumed by black men. Aspects of the 
problem to be examined include: the black as "invisible man;" the act of 
writing as a form of role-playing; the independent, autonomous life of myths 
and stereotypes; the interplay between the self-protective and self-deceptive 
functions of masks. Certain contemporary works will be studied to try to 
determine whether the purpose and effect of the black man's role-playing 
have changed. Reading will include works by Wright, Ellison, Fanon, Genet, 
Melville, LeRoi Jones, James Weldon Johnson. 

I-B THE DIALOGUE: ANCIENT AND MODERN Mr. Clay 

A study of the nature of the dialogue in its Greek origins and of its use as a 
current term in the language of modern social and political thought. The 
speeches of epic and history (Homer, Herodotus, Thucydides) lead to the 
Platonic dialogue which is the main concern of the seminar — especially the 

166 



Phaednis which is the Platonic dialogue on the dialogue. The dialogue of TPI 
pastoral poetry (TTieocritus, Vergil) follows; then the "Aristotelian" dialogue 
illustrated by Cicero, On the Nature of the Gods; Galileo, Dialogue Con 



•n 



cerning the Two Chief World Systems; and Hume, Dialogues on Natural fH 



Religion. The last dialogues to be taken up — ^Plato, Symposium and Castig 
lione, Courtier — offer the contrast between the ancient and the early modem 
dialogue. I 



(0 



UNSOLVED AND UNSOLVABLE PROBLEMS FROM GREEK ^ 

MATHEMATICS Mr. Connolly ^ 

A study of some of the problems left unsolved by Greek mathematicians such ■■ 

as the angle trisection problem, the N-sided polygon problem, and the £ 
attempts to prove Euclid's fifth postulate. The effect that these unanswered 

questions have had on modern mathematics will be investigated, especially UJ 

the way in which wholly new theories have blossomed in the successful 111 

attempts to solve them. Rudimentary Galois Theory will get particular _ 

attention. Some historical material will be presented. Readings will include ^ 

Boyer, A History of Mathematics; Rapport and Wright, Mathematics; Rade- ^ 

macher and Toeplitz, Enjoyment of Mathematics. ^ 



> 
(D 



I-D UTOPIAS AND COMMUNAL SOCIETIES Mr. D'Andrea 

An examination of Utopias and communal societies which will seek answers ]J 
to questions such as the following: 

What are the characteristics of Utopian societies? What features of society 
have been emphasized or eliminated from Utopias? How have some of these 
ideas worked in planned communities? A study of the psychological and 
sociological investigations of planned communities (e.g., the kibbutzim) will 
be made. Students will be invited to help plan the course. Reading will 
include: Huxley, Brave New World; Lewis, The Story of Utopias; More, 
Utopia; Plato, The Republic; Skinner, Walden Two; Zamiatin, We. 

I-E LITERATURE AND SOCIETY IN REVOLUTIONARY RUSSIA 

Mrs. Gerstein 
A study in which literary evidence will be considered in an attempt to under- 
stand the effect of European experience on a traditional society. Reading 
will include works by Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Turgenev, Chekhov, Bunin, 
Gorky, and end with the Revolution of 1917 seen through the works of 
Babel and Pilniak. While the historical and sociological approach will be 
important to this study, the emphasis will be on the treatment of the novels 
as imaginative literature. 

I-F LITERATURE OF THE GHETTO Mr. Kannerstein 

A study concentrated on the experience of black people and Jews in 
American ghettoes. The chief aim of the course will be to make clear the 
ways in which various writers have portrayed the ghettoes, and to achieve an 
understanding of the individuals who live in them. Reading will include: 
Cleaver, Soul on Ice; DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk; Washington, Up From 
Slavery; Paton, Cry the Beloved Country; Oliver, The Meaning of the Blues; 
H. Roth, Call It Sleep; Abrahams, Deep Down in the Jungle; P. Roth, 
selections from Portnoy's Complaint. 

167 



I-G THE SELF Mr. Kosman 

A study of various theories and views concerning the nature of the self and 
self-knowledge. Readings will be from literature, psychology, and philosophy, 
including, among others, works by Plato, Jung, Sartre, and Hesse. 

I-H THE CONDITION OF MAN Mr. Lester 

A study of some recent views of man which have helped to make us what 
we are; an examination of how we view ourselves and of our guesses as to 
the future. Readings will engage with evolutionary theory and its implications 
as seen in imaginative literature, the faith of the existentialist, and selected 
science fiction. 

I-I THE PHENOMENON OF MAN Mr. Loewy 

A historical and analytical study of man as he emerges from his primate 
ancestry, a tool-making, social, self-conscious being, moving through a series 
of socio-technical revolutions into an uncertain future. Besides creating an 
awareness of man as a major ecological phenomenon capable of producing 
far-reaching changes in the economy of our planet, this seminar is concerned 
with the interrelationship between commitment and analysis in human 
thought and in social action. Readings will include: Lynd, Knowledge for 
What; Gaylord Simpson, The Meaning of Evolution; LeGros Clark, History 
of the Primates; Morris, The Naked Ape; Howell, Early Man; Vercors, You 
Shall Know Them; Childe, Man Makes Himself; Turnbull, The Forest 
People; Ruesch, Top of the World; Kramer, History Begins at Sumer; Lorenz, 
On Aggression; Ehrlich, The Population Bomb; Ehrenfeld, Biological Con- 
servation; de Chardin, The Phenomenon of Man. 

I-J THE INDIVIDUAL AND HIS SOCIETY IN THE MODERN NOVEL 

Mrs. Quinn 
An examination of the individual's responsibility to his society and society's 
responsibility to the individual. Questions such as the following will be 
examined: To what extent should the individual accept or reject the values 
of his society? What should be the basis of his acceptance or rejection? What 
is the individual's responsibility to the social, religious and political life of 
his society? What is the eflFect of society's pressures on the individual? What 
is the effect of the absence of society's restraints on the individual? What is 
the value of the rebel in society? Is man prepared to accept the responsibili- 
ties that go with freedom? Readings will include: Camus, The Plague; 
Conrad, Heart of Darkness; Ellison, Invisible Man; Faulkner, Light in 
August; Kafka, The Trial; Malraux, Man's Fate. 

I-K MUSICAL DRAMA Mr. Reese 

An examination of selected operas, in whole or in part, with a two-fold 
purpose: (1) to deal with the basic concepts of text, music and dramatic 
action, determining the extent to which a synthesis of these concepts has 
been achieved by the composers in each work, (2) to investigate the role of 
tragedy and comedy in the works studied. The seminar does not pretend to 
offer a history of opera nor to follow a chronological pattern of presentation. 
Representative works and some writings of the following composers will be 
included in the course of study: Monteverdi, Gluck, Beethoven, Verdi, 
Wagner, Debussy, Richard Strauss, Berg, Britten. 

168 



I-L THE HEROIC EPIC Mr. Russo 

A reading of such masterpieces of "primary" epic as Gilgamesh, Beowulf, 
Song of Roland, and Icelandic saga, and comparison with Homer's Iliad and 
Odyssey. Discussion and tutorial reports will focus on those qualities that 
distinguish heroic epic from other kinds of epic and the epic hero from the 
hero of other literary forms; on the role played by archetypal and universal 
folk-tale patterns in these epics; and on certain qualities that seem to set the 
Homeric poems apart from the heroic epic tradition in which they originate. 

I-M GIANTS OF RUSSIAN FICTION Mr. Satterthwaite 

A study of Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov and Tolstoy's War and 
Peace, two disparate yet similiar views of the world. 

IN SOME ROOTS OF RADICALISM IN AMERICA Miss Shumer 

A study of the development of the early labor movement in the U.S. from 
the 1880's to the 1930's. The seminar will deal with, (1) the social conditions 
that gave rise to union organizing, (2) the ideas and strategy of various 
organizing attempts, both radical and moderate, and (3) the response of the 
government and society. Some consideration will be given to contemporary 
radicalism. Readings will include: Sinclair, The Jungle; Dos Passes, 1919; 
Preston, Aliens and Dissenters; Marine, Black Panthers Reports to the Com- 
mission to Study Violence and Civil Disorders in America. 

I-O MODERN EUROPEAN DRAMA Mr. Cary 

A study, with occasional dramatic readings, of plays by Ibsen, Chekhov, 
Shaw, Brecht, Eliot, Strindberg, Pirandello, Sartre, lonesco, Beckett, Pinter, 
Frisch, and Diirrenmatt. 

I-P THE ENVIRONMENTAL CRISIS Mr. Trela 

A study of selected aspects of the interaction between man and his physical 
environment. The major emphasis will be on global and long-range problems 
rather than local and short-term problems. There will also be opportunities, 
through the use of outside speakers who are specialists in these areas, to 
examine some political, economic, social and moral aspects of the environ- 
mental question. Readings will include: Novick, The Careless Atom; de Bell, 
ed. The Environmental Handbook; Ehrlich, The Population Bomb; Dubos, 
Man Adapting; Ewald, ed. Environment for Man: The Next Fifty Years; 
I Wagner, The Human Use of the Earth. 

FRESHMAN SEMINARS TO BE OFFERED IN SECOND SEMESTER 
1970-71, AND IN 1971-72, WILL BE ANNOUNCED. 



169 



EDUCATIONAL INVOLVEMENT PROGRAM 

For students seeking an academic experience in which they can both 
learn about and contribute to the solution of urban problems, the Edu- 
cational Involvement Program provides both full and part-time projects 
which can be integrated with their academic program. Full-time partici- 
pants live for a semester in a Philadelphia lower-income neighborhood. 
While there, they do field-work with community-based organizations, 
take an on-site seminar taught by Haverford and Bryn Mawr faculty, 
and participate in an on-campus seminar. The project is counted as 
one of a student's eight semesters needed for graduation. Two inner-city 
projects are currently in operation. 

Community Organization Assistants Project. Community Organization 
Assistants live and work in the Germantown section and are assigned 
to various community agencies and action groups. Working under the 
supervision of a coordinator, they work in a variety of assignments that 
range from organizing lower-income tenants in pursuit of their rights, 
to block- work with neighborhood renewal programs. 

The academic component of this project consists of two seminars: 

161a,b TOPICS IN COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION 

Mr. Elder (first semester), Mr. Galper (second semester) 

A weekly on-site seminar built around field-work of participants in the 
project. Theories of community organization and social change are discussed, 
illustrated and criticized in the light of field-work experience. Participation 
limited to students in the project. 

SEMINAR ON URBAN PROBLEMS 

Students participating in the Community Organization Assistants and School- 
Community Assistants projects meet regularly with interested faculty and 
on-campus students in a forum-seminar to discuss issues emerging from 
field-work experience in the projects. Topic areas are defined by the group, 
with each faculty participant involved in a block of sessions calling on his 
particular expertise, and with appropriate readings suggested by him and the 
field experience of students. Foci for discussion include anti-poverty programs, 
poverty law, social medicine, social and economic factors in pupil perform- 
ance, and financing urban education. 

This seminar does not ordinarily confer separate academic credit, but on- 
campus students may, by arrangement with their departmental chairman, take 
it for a half or whole course credit in the department concerned. 

School-Community Assistants Project. School-Community Assistants 
live and work in a North Philadelphia community where, as employees 
of a neighborhood school corporation, they work as teaching assistants 

170 I 



in two elementary schools. Field-work activity includes in-service J|| 

teacher training, the teaching of basic reading and mathematical skills, ri 

and the initiation of projects of special interest to School-Community mm 

Assistants and the corporation. •" 

n 

The academic component of this project consists of two seminars: ^ 
162a,b TOPICS IN URBAN EDUCATION Mr. Wehr 



A weekly on-site seminar built around field-work of participants in the -^ 
project. The several sections focus on 1) basic teaching techniques, 2) an |J 



Forum-Seminar SEMINAR ON URBAN PROBLEMS (See description under 
Community Organization Assistants project.) 



H 

5 

z 



analysis of the Philadelphia school system, 3) theories of innovative educa- 
tion, and 4) general problems of urban education with an emphasis on the 
black child. Readings on innovative education, teaching, and the black D 
experience and resource persons from the community and the school system ■«■ 
provide a basis for discussion of problems observed in field-work assignments. 
Participation limited to students in the project. "■ 

Z 

< 



r 
< 



Suburban Involvement Project. Part-time involvement in the Educa- 
tional Involvement Program centers around nearby suburban commu- 
nities. A Suburban Involvement Coordinator assists students returning 
from inner-city projects, and other interested students, in affiliating with ill 
suburban institutions and action organizations concerned with problems ^ 
of racism, economic injustice, and urban violence. Students work as 
teaching assistants in public schools, and with religious organizations 
and action groups working for changes in racial attitudes and for oppor- 



m 

Z 



tunities for minorities in metropolitan Philadelphia. T 

This part-time involvement is often the basis for independent and 
group study taken for academic credit. 

The Educational Involvement Program provides work-study oppor- 
tunities for three specific groups of students: 1) black students who 
wish to relate their academic program more closely to their participation 
in the political and economic development of the black community, 
2) social science majors, and 3) other students interested in a thorough 
understanding of urban problems and the suburban role in their solution. 

Anyone interested in participating in Educational Involvement Pro- 
gram projects should see Mr. Wehr or Miss Dickson at the Center for 
Nonviolent Conflict Resolution located in Yarnall House. 



171 



URBAN STUDIES 

Assistant Professor Samuel Gubins, Adviser 

The program in Urban Studies is designed to permit the student to 
acquire a background of data, methods, and experience relevant to the 
problems which face cities and to encourage students to focus their 
studies on these problems and their possible solutions. 

Utilizing courses currently offered in several departments, students 
will focus the methodology and content of various disciplines on urban 
life. The program is designed to create lasting interest in and concern 
with the urban milieu. In addition, the program will serve those students 
contemplating graduate work in history or the social sciences as well 
as the areas of law, business, journalism, planning, and public service. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

Major requirements and the overall course of study will be agreed upon in 
consultation with the adviser, taking account of the student's special strengths and 
interests. In planning his schedule a student should anticipate the following 
requirements: 

An introductory course in two of the following fields: economics, political 
science, psychology, and sociology. 

A disciplinary base will be established by taking one of the following sequences 
of courses: 

Economics 101a, b, 209a, 214b, 301a, 304b or 305a. 

Political Science 151a or 151b, 223a or 252b, 225b or 220a, 218a, 316b, 258b. 
Psychology 136b, 130b, 223a, 235a. 
Sociology 153d,e,g, 155a, 159a, 251a, 252b: 
A course on quantitative methods; 

A senior thesis based on empirical, field or theoretical work; 
A senior evaluation. Each student will choose one faculty member to associate 
with the Urban Studies Adviser in supervising the thesis and the senior evaluation; 
Four additional courses which may be chosen from those listed below as well 
as others offered at the University of Pennsylvania and Swarthmore College. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONORS 

The award of Honors will be determined on the basis of the senior evaluation, 
course work, and an outstanding paper. 

COURSES AT HAVERFORD AND BRYN MAWR COLLEGES 

Economics 101a,b INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS Staff 

Economics 208b PUBLIC FINANCE AND FISCAL Mr. Hubbard 

POLICY 

Offered at Bryn Mawr 

172 



I 



Economics 209a 
Economics 214b 
Economics 300b 

Economics 301a 

Economics 302b 

Economics 304b 
Mathematics 118b 
Mathematics 119a 
Political Science 151a,b 

Political Science 218a 

Political Science 316b 

Political Science 252b 

Political Science 258b 

Psychology 015a 

Psychology 223 a 
Psychology 235a 
Psychology 130b 

Psychology 307a 

Social Science 262b 

Sociology 153d,e,g 

Sociology 155a 

Sociology 159a 

Sociology 251a 

Sociology 252b 

Sociology 352b 

Sociology 354b 
Sociology 357a 



ECONOMICS OF URBAN POVERTY Mr. Gubins 
ECONOMICS OF MINORITIES 

RESEARCH SEMINAR ON Mr. Gubins 

HUMAN RESOURCES, POVERTY, 
AND URBAN ECONOMICS 

STATISTICAL METHODS IN Mrs. Hunter 

ECONOMICS 

INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRICS 

Mrs. Hunter 

MICROECONOMIC THEORY Mr. Gubins 

PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS Staff 

CALCULUS AND ANALYSIS Mr. Rosenzweig 

POLITICS: POLITICAL ANALYSIS AND Staff 
PUBLIC POLICY 

URBAN POLITICS Mr. Ross 

Offered at Bryn Mawr 

URBAN AFFAIRS Mr. Ross 

Offered at Bryn Mawr 

RATIONALITY, PURPOSE Mr. Waldman 

AND COLLECTIVE WELFARE 

PUBLIC POLICY: CIVIL RIGHTS Miss Shumer 
AND POVERTY 

CONTEMPORARY PSYCHOLOGICAL Mr. Heath 
TOPICS: ALIENATION AND THE 
EDUCATIONAL PROCESS 

THEORIES OF PERSONALITY 

PERCEPTION AND COGNITION 

ANIMAL LEARNING AND 
ETHOLOGY 

SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY OF 
ATTITUDES 

THE AFRO-AMERICAN 

EXPERIENCE: SOUTH AMERICA 
AND THE CARIBBEAN 

STATISTICS FOR THE SOCIAL SCIENCES Staff 

FOUNDATIONS OF SOCIOLOGY Mr. Hohenstein 

SOCIOLOGY OF THE FAMILY 

SOCIOLOGY OF CRIME 

SOCIAL CHANGE 

DATA PROCESSING AND 
COMPUTER TECHNIQUES 

SOCIOLOGY OF KNOWLEDGE 

POLITICAL ANTHROPOLOGY 



Mr. Heath 

Mr. Rowe 

Mr. D'Andrea 

Mr. Perloe 

Mr. Moore 



Mr. Hohenstein 

Mr. Hohenstein 

Mr. Hohenstein 

Mr. Hare 



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01 

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2 

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Mr. Hohenstein 
Mr. MacGaffey 



173 



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PHYSICAL EDUCATION -p 

Dana W. Swan, II, Director of Athletics and Chairman a 

Professor William Docherty, Jr. ffj 

Richard O. Morsch — 

Anthony J. Zanin d 

Ron Barnes S 

Assistants: Francis E. Dunbar r 

R. Henri Gordon 
Frederick Hartmann 
George Leute 
Joseph McQuillan 
James Mills 

Howard Price S 

Frederick C. Schulze, Jr. j 

Oliver G. Swan, Jr. -■ 

John B. Wilson Q 

College Physician: William W. Lander, M.D. Z 

The Physical Education Department stresses three elements in its 
program: the promotion of physical fitness as beneficial to physical and 
mental health, the attainment of proficiency in sports with lifelong 
participation value, especially in group endeavor, and the development 
of sportsmanship and community spirit through intramural and inter- 
collegiate competition. 

The Department aims to guide the student to activities which are 
commensurate with his level of physical development, while teaching 
him the physiological and psychological advantages of physical activity. 

The Department places special emphasis on providing facilities for, 
and instruction in, sports with lifelong participation value. Haverford's 
courses in physical education seek to insure that each student will 
develop both interest and proficiency in a sport which he can continue 
after graduation. 

The intramural program offers a variety of individual and team 
activities from which the student may derive the rewards and satisfac- 
tions of working with others and of sharing responsibility in a group 
endeavor. Intramurals also provide an important component in the 
recreational offerings of the College. 

The athletic program as a whole, from basic instruction to intercol- 

175 



legiate competition, is concerned with the individual student's develop- 
ment and enjoyment. The sports selected are determined mainly by 
current student interest. 

PROGRAM 

The intercollegiate program consists of schedules in 13 sports. Par- 
ticipation in these sports may be substituted for the physical education 
requirement. The following table summarizes the sports and physical 
education activities available. Special programs may be arranged with 
the permission of the Department. 

Instructional 
Intercollegiate and Intramural 



Fall: 


Football 


Cross 


Golf 


* Tennis 




Soccer 


Country 


* Soccer 


Weight training 




Cricket 


Sailing 


Sailing 
* Touch Football 


** Modern dance 


Winter 


: Basketbal 


Swimming 


Badminton 


Karate 




Fencing 


Wrestling 


*Basketball 
Handball 


*Volleyball 
Weight training 
** Modern dance 


Spring: 


Baseball 


Sailing 


Golf 


* Tennis 




Cricket 


Tennis 


Lacrosse 


** Modern dance 




Golf 


Track 


Soccer 
* Softball 


Special physical 
activities 



* Intramural competition available. 
**At Bryn Mawr College. 

Evidence of satisfactory physical condition is required by the Depart- 
ment before a student is permitted to participate in any aspect of the 
program. A swimming test is given to all entering students. This test 
must be passed by all students before graduation. Swimming instruction 
is given in the gymnasium pool during the fall and spring. 



176 



I 



The outdoor facilities include: Walton Field for football and track 
with a 440-yard oval and a 220-yard eight-lane straight-away cinder 
track; 4V^-mile cross country course within the campus limits; the 
Class of '88 - '22 and Merion Fields — which are used for soccer in 
the fall and softball and lacrosse in the spring; a skating pond, Cope 
Field for cricket, the Class of '16 Field used for practice football in the 
fall and baseball in the spring; fifteen tennis courts, six of which are 
all-weather; a driving range with green and sandtraps for golf practice, 
and the privileges of Merion West Course for the varsity golf team. 

Indoor facilities include the Gymnasium and Alumni Field House. 
The basement of the Gymnasium contains dressing rooms, showers, 
lockers, a swimming pool, wrestling room, and training room. Through 
the generosity of the Class of 1928 it has been possible to provide addi- 
tional locker and dressing facilities, a new stock room, and a laundry 
and drying room. A regulation basketball court is on the main floor, 
with handball and badminton courts. 

Alumni Field House, donated by alumni and friends of the College 
in 1957, provides extensive facilities for additional athletic activities. 
Included are a 7-lap-mile track and areas for field events, a 120' by 120' 
indoor dirt "playing field," a batting cage for baseball and cricket, nets 
for golf, two basketball courts, and two tennis courts. Spectator seating 
capacity exceeds 1000. 



177 



STUDEIMT 



AND 
ACTIVITIES 




HEALTH PROGRAM 

The Haverford College health program is under the direction of the 
College physician, who holds office hours at the Infirmary at stated 
hours and is available in any emergency. The advice and help of expert 
medical consultants may be obtained readily at the Bryn Mawr Hospital. 
When necessary, additional consultants are obtained from one of the 
university hospitals in Philadelphia. A College nurse is on duty at the 
Infirmary at all times. 

Each student is required to have a complete physical examination 
by his own physician before entering the College and each year before 
returning to campus. A report of this examination, on a form supplied 
by the College and signed by the student's physician, must be submitted 
to the College physician not later than October 1 each year. Follow-up 
examinations are given when indicated by the College physician. In- 
fluenza vaccine is recommended and given to the entire student body 
each year, at no additional cost to the student. Immunization against 
smallpox, tetanus, poliomyelitis, and typhoid fever is required before 
entering the College. Pre-entrance chest X-ray examination is strongly 
recommended. 

Each student is entitled to unlimited dispensary service, at stated 
hours, and emergency service at any time. 

In case of illness, each student is entitled to two weeks of residence 
in the Morris Infirmary each semester, ordinary medicine, diagnostic 
laboratory work, X-rays needed for diagnosis, and the services of the 
College physician and resident nurse. 

Students will be charged $5 a day for residence in the Infirmary after 
their first two weeks. Day students will be charged for board in addition, 
while in the Infirmary. 

Each student is also covered by a blanket accident policy which pays 
actual expenses resulting from any accident up to a limit of $1000 for 
each accident. The expenses covered include X-rays, medicine, surgical 
appliances, hospital bills, nursing care, physician's fee, surgeon's fee, 
and also dentist's bills for repair or replacement of natural teeth as a 
result of an accident, subject to the approval of the College physician. 
The coverage is in force from 12:01 a.m. Standard Time three days 
before the date when registration of entering students begins until 
midnight three days after Commencement Day. 

All of these services and benefits are covered by the unit fee which 
is paid by all students. 

180 



COUNSELING SERVICES 

The College offers counseling for personal, educational, or vocational 
problems, under the direction of two clinical psychologists and a con- 
sultant psychiatrist. When warranted, referral is made to outside sources 
for psychotherapy in private practice. All student communications with 
the counseling staff are held in strict professional confidence, as are the 
names of students counseled. 

An important part of the broader function of the counselors is to 
lead and provide supervision for the "Interact" group program which, 
in a manner similar to "sensitivity training," seeks to deal with broader 
concerns of facilitating interpersonal communication, important to com- 
munity life at Haverford as well as to individual growth. "Interact" 
groups are open to a limited number of students each year. The goals 
of the program are to broaden the spectrum of emotional experiences; 
to provide training in open, honest, but also empathic confrontation of 
others; to enhance a spirit of group responsibility for each individual; 
and to promote growth in interpersonal perception. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

The Students' Association is made up of all students enrolled at 
Haverford College. The College has delegated to the Students' Associa- 
tion — and the Association has accepted — the responsibility for nearly 
all aspects of student conduct and of student organizations on the cam- 
pus. The Students' Association in turn delegates authority to the Stu- 
dents' Council and to the Honor Council to carry on its executive, 
legislative, and judicial functions. 

The Students' Council consists of the five officers composing the 
Executive Committee of the Students' Association (who are chosen in 
campus-wide elections) and the Hall Representatives Council. 

The Students' Council manages extracurricular activities, exclusive of 
athletics, and allocates to each organization a percentage of the unit fee. 
Through its several committees, the Council is involved in almost every 
facet of student life. 

The First Vice-President of the Students' Association presides over 
the Honor Council, which is composed of three representatives elected 
by each class. However, the President and the First Vice-President of 
the Students' Association are automatically among their classes' repre- 
sentatives. 

181 



The Honor Council administers all aspects of the honor system and 
has the responsibility of interpreting specific matters pertaining to the 
honor system. 

HONOR SYSTEM 

The honor system at Haverford is based on the belief that students 
can successfully take the responsibility of establishing and maintaining 
standards in social and academic life. In the academic area the honor 
system stipulates that one should distinguish clearly between one's own 
work and material from any other source. Since examinations are not 
proctored at Haverford, suitable conduct is required by accepted code. 
In the social area the guiding principle is respect for women guests and 
for the College commimity. 

The honor pledge is called to the attention of each applicant for 
admission to Haverford College: 

"I hereby accept the Haverford College honor system, 
realizing that it is my responsibility to safeguard, uphold, 
and preserve each part of the honor system and the atti- 
tude of personal and collective honor upon which it is 
based." 

Specifically, each student who enters Haverford pledges himself to 
uphold three responsibilities under the honor system: (1) to govern 
his own conduct according to the principles which have been adopted 
by the Students' Association; (2) in case of a breach of the honor 
system to report himself to the Honor Council; (3) if he becomes 
aware of a violation by another student, to ask the oifender to fulfill 
his pledge by reporting himself. If the offender refuses, the student 
is pledged to report the matter to the Honor Council. In this manner 
each individual becomes personally responsible for the successful opera- 
tion of the entire honor system. 

There are several ways in which the honor system contributes to the 
quality of student life at Haverford. There is educational value in 
considering carefully the factors which make standards necessary and 
in deciding as a group what standards and regulations are needed in 
the College. It follows that a large degree of self-government is made 
possible, since students are willing to respect those standards which 
they themselves have set up. 

Each entering student must feel confident before selecting Haverford 
that he can give his active support to the honor system. He should 

182 



realize that its success, which is of great importance to him personally 
and to the whole student body, and indeed to the College itself, depends 
upon his willingness to give it his complete support. 

Because of the honor system, students at Haverford can schedule 
their own midyear and final examinations within the period of time 
set aside for them. The inequities which result when the examination 
schedule is arranged impersonally are thus eliminated. The system is 
administered by a student committee cooperating with the recorder, 
and is perpetuated by serious student commitment to academic respon- 
sibility and the honor system. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS 

Haverford students participate in a wide variety of cultural and social 
activities. The extracurricular life here is less formalized than that of 
many other colleges. There are many activities and organizations which 
continue to function year after year and others which flourish when 
there is sufficient student interest. At Haverford every student is encour- 
aged to join with others in pursuing mutual interests, with the under- 
standing that in this way he will be making the kind of contributions 
which are so necessary if this small community is to maintain diversity 
and to provide a rich experience for all its members. 

Many of the organizations, such as the Drama Club, various musical 
groups, and the Modern Dance Club, cooperate with organizations at 
Bryn Mawr College. Others are more exclusively composed of Haver- 
ford students. 

A program for chamber music was instituted in 1969 in conjunction 
with the appointment of the De Pasquale String Quartet and Sylvia 
Glickman, pianist, as artists-in-residence. The artists-in-residence offer 
a series of public performances during the year as well as a program 
of chamber-music coaching. Any student with sufficient instrumental 
background is eligible to participate. 

Publications include the Haverjord-Bryn Mawr College News, the 
campus newspaper which appears weekly and semi- weekly on occasion; 
the Haverford College Handbook, published each fall with the help of 
the Students' Council; and the Record, a yearbook. Several literary 
magazines have, over the past decade, provided an opportunity for 
publication of literary works by Haverford and Bryn Mawr students. 
Opportunities for participation by all interested students are available 
on business and editorial staff's of these publications. 

183 



All organizations on the Haverford campus hope to attract committed 
and imaginative participants. It is also hoped that each student will 
endeavor to participate in those activities which interest him and to feel 
especially free to explore new interests while on campus. 

COMMUNITY CONCERN 

Haverford College has traditionally been concerned with the larger 
community. In recent years, many students have demonstrated a desire 
for greater involvement in community concerns during their undergradu- 
ate years. There are many ways a Haverford student can find this 
involvement. He may do it through one of the curriculum-related 
involvement programs, which may include course work or individual 
projects. He may participate in Students' Council committees which are 
involved with both local communities and broader outside concerns. 
Examples are the Community Relations Committee, which carries on 
tutoring and recreation programs, and the Social Action Committee, 
which unites all civil rights, civil liberties, peace, and other groups in a 
single organization. He may work with the Serendipity Day Camp, 
which members of the College and local communities operate during 
the summer for neighborhood children. Haverford students can gain a 
great deal from working with individuals and groups in ofT-campus 
communities, and students, faculty, and administration are continually 
seeking new avenues for meaningful involvement. 



184 



FELLO\A/SHIPS, 
SCHOLARSHIPS 

AIMD 
PRIZES 









V 



gUif-'*^ III 



HUPWfm"^ 







ENDOWED FELLOWSHIPS FOR HAVERFORD GRADUATES 

Clementine Cope Fellowships, established in 1899 by Clementine 
Cope, granddaughter of Thomas P. Cope, member of the Board of 
Managers from 1830 to 1849. 

These fellowships are to "assist worthy and promising graduates of 
Haverford College in continuing their studies at Haverford or at some 
other institute, in this country or abroad, approved by the Board of 
Managers." 

First and Second Cope Fellows are nominated by the faculty, and 
selected by the Board of Managers. Individual stipends, not to exceed 
$1,000, are determined by the Board. 

Letters of application, accompanied by relevant statements of extra- 
curricular activities, must be in the hands of the President by March 1. 

Augustus Taber Murray Research Fellowships, established in 
1964 by two anonymous friends "in recognition of the scholarly attain- 
ments of Augustus Taber Murray, a distinguished alumnus of Haverford 
College of the Class of 1885." 

These fellowships are for further study in English literature or 
philology, the classics, or German literature or philology, in other 
institutions, toward the degree of Doctor of Philosophy or its future 
equivalent. 

Only unmarried students are eligible. Further considerations are the 
candidate's promise of success in graduate work and the availability of 
other financial assistance in his proposed field of study. 

Usually one Augustus Taber Murray Research Fellow is nominated 
by the faculty, on recommendation of the Committee on Student Stand- 
ing and Programs. Individual stipend is $900. The same student may be 
awarded the fellowship for two or three years. 

Letters of application must be in the hands of the President by 
March 1. 

ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS 

(// is not necessary for applicants to mention specific scholarships in 
their applications except in those cases where they meet the special condi- 
tions stated for the award.) 

1 890 Memorial Scholarship Fund — Established by a member of 
the Class of 1923 in memory of his father, of the Class of 1890, and in 
recognition of his father's friendship with the members of his class. The 

186 



income from this fund is to be awarded as a scholarship by the College 
to a deserving student. 

M. A. Ajzenberg Scholarship Fund — Established in 1962 in 
memory of M. A. Ajzenberg, for students planning to major or majoring 
in physics or astronomy, preferably graduates of public schools in New 
Jersey or New York City. 

Joseph C. and Anne N. Birdsall Scholarships — Scholarships, 
awarded at the discretion of the faculty to some student or students 
preparing for medicine, the selection to be based on character, scholar- 
ship, and financial need. 

Caroline Chase Scholarship Fund — Established December 10, 
1951, by Caroline Chase, daughter of Thomas Chase, one-time President 
of the College. This fund is an expression of Thomas Chase's enthusi- 
astic appreciation for the College's high standards of scholarship in 
Greek, Latin, and English literature. 

Class of 1904 Scholarship Fund — Established June 4, 1954, in 
commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of the Class of 1904. The 
income from this fund, which was contributed by the class and the 
families of its deceased members, will provide one scholarship. 

Class of 1912 Scholarship Fund — The fund was given in com- 
memoration of the 50th Anniversary of the Class of 1912. The income 
is to be used for scholarship purposes, such scholarship being awarded 
preferably to an African or Asian student, but if no such recipient is 
available this scholarship may be assigned to some other deserving 
student. 

Class of 1913 Scholarship — One scholarship, preference to be 
given to descendants of members of the Class of 1913 who may apply 
and who meet the usual requirements of the College. 

Class of 1917 Scholarship — One scholarship, preference to be 
given to descendants of members of the Class of 1917 who may apply 
and who meet the usual requirements of the College. 

Class of 1936 Scholarship Fund — Established in 1961 by the 
Class of 1936 as a 25th Anniversary Gift, the income is to be used for 
scholarship aid without restriction. 

W. W. Comfort Fund — This fund was established in 1947 by the 
Haverford Society of Maryland. Grants from this fund are made with 
the understanding that the recipient shall, at an unstated time after 

187 



leaving College, repay to the fund the amount which he received while 
an undergraduate. 

J. Horace Cook Fund — Established in 1955 by a bequest under 
the will of J. Horace Cook, of the Class of 1881, for a scholarship, 
one to be awarded each year so that there will be a student in each 
class receiving his tuition from this fund. 

Howard M. Cooper Scholarship — Upon her death, on April 11, 
1966, a gift of part of the residue from a Deed of Trust created by 
Emily Cooper Johnson, a friend of the College, became effective. This 
fund is for the estabhshment of the "Howard M. Cooper Scholarship," 
the use of which is intended for such students as need assistance to 
acquire education, preference being given to members of the Religious 
Society of Friends and especially to those affiliated with Newton 
Preparative Meeting of Friends of Camden, New Jersey, of which 
Howard M. Cooper was a life-long member. 

Thomas P. Cope Scholarship — One scholarship. 

Daniel E. Davis, Jr. Memorial Scholarship — One scholarship, 
awarded at the discretion of the faculty, "on the basis of character, 
scholarship, and financial need." 

Kathleen H. and Martin M. Decker Foundation Scholarship 
— Established in 1958, the Kathleen H. and Martin M. Decker Foun- 
dation Scholarship is awarded annually to young men preparing them- 
selves in the fields of physics, mathematics, chemistry, and biology. The 
Scholarship Committee, in making their selections, will have regard for 
candidates who rank high in scholarship, leadership, and character. At 
least one scholarship will be given each year with a maximum grant 
of $1000. The actual amount of the stipend will be determined by the 
financial need of the candidate. 

Jonathan and Rachel Cope Evans Fund — Founded in 1952 by 
the children and grandchildren of Jonathan and Rachel Cope Evans, 
one half of the income of this fund is to be used for scholarships. 

The F of X Scholarship — Established by the bequest of Legh Wilber 
Reid, who died April 3, 1961 and who was the esteemed professor of 
mathematics at the College from 1900 to 1934. His wiH provides that 
the scholarship is to be known as The F of x Scholarship. The scholar- 
ship is to be awarded to a student in the sophomore, junior, or senior 
class who has successfully completed the freshman course in mathe- 
matics at Haverford College, who has shown a real interest in mathe- 

188 



matics and who has given promise for the future of his work in that 
subject. 

Christian Febiger Memorial Scholarship — One scholarship, 
estabhshed June 13, 1946, by Mrs. Madeleine Seabury Febiger in 
memory of her husband, Christian Febiger, of the Class of 1900. The 
income of this fund is applied in paying tuition and other College 
expenses of worthy, needy students. 

Elihu Grant Memorial Scholarship Fund — Two or more 
scholarships, established February 2, 1944, by Mrs. Elihu Grant to 
commemorate the service to Haverford College of Dr. Elihu Grant, 
from 1917 to 1938 a member of the College faculty. The income from 
this fund is applied to scholarship assistance to students in humanistic 
studies, primarily those specializing in the study of Biblical Literature 
and Oriental subjects. In special circumstances the income may be 
utilized to assist those working for a postgraduate degree at Haverford 
College. 

Roy Thurlby Griffith Memorial Fund — Estabhshed in June 
1952, by Grace H. Griffith, in memory of Roy Thurlby Griffith of the 
Class of 1919. The income from this fund is to be awarded as a scholar- 
ship by the College, preference to be given to boys who have no father 
and who are in need of financial assistance. 

Samuel E. Hilles Memorial Scholarship — One scholarship. 

Sarah Tatum Hilles Memorial Scholarship Fund — Founded 
November 1, 1954, by bequest of $75,534.58 from Joseph T. Hilles, 
Class of 1888, in memory of his mother, Sarah Tatum Hilles; to pro- 
vide for such number of annual scholarships of $250 each as such 
income shall be sufficient to create; to be awarded by the Managers to 
needy and deserving students; and to be known as Sarah Tatum Hilles 
Memorial Scholarships. 

Isaac Thorne Johnson Scholarship — One scholarship, estab- 
hshed in 1916 by a member of the Class of 1881 "to assist worthy young 
men of Wilmington (Ohio) Yearly Meeting or of the Central West to 
enjoy the privileges of Haverford College." 

Mary M. Johnson Scholarship — One scholarship. 

Jacob P. Jones Endowment Fund — This fund was established in 
1897. The donor stated: "My hope is that under the blessing and favor 
of God there will come from this source a revenue which shall be 

189 



productive of growth and vigor in the institution as well as help at 
this critical period of their lives to many deserving young men of 
slender patrimony." 

Richard T. Jones Scholarship — One scholarship. 

RuFUS Matthew^ Jones Scholarship Fund — Established in 1959 
by Clarence E. Tobias, Jr., as a testimonial to Rufus Jones "and in 
gratitude for the excellent educational facilities Haverford provided for 
me and my son." The principal and income of this fund are to be used 
for scholarships or loans to students majoring in philosophy. Preference 
is to be given to seniors. The recipient will be selected by the chairman 
of the Philosophy Department in consultation, if he desires, with his 
departmental associates and in accord with the usual scholarship 
practice of the College. The donor welcomes additions to the fund from 
any who might be interested. 

George Kerbaugh Scholarship — This fund was estabhshed in 
1960 in recognition and appreciation of the leadership and personal 
generosity of George Kerbaugh, Class of 1910, who headed the efforts 
of the Triangle Society to provide additional stands for Walton Field. 

George Kerbaugh's many services to the College include his chair- 
manship of the committee which raised the funds of the Library addition 
built in the 1930's. The Board of Managers then expressed to him 
"its heartfelt appreciation and its sense of great obligation for a notable 
achievement." 

C. Prescott Knight, Jr. Scholarship — Established by the Haver- 
ford Society of New England for a New England boy from a New 
England school. In the award of this scholarship a committee, com- 
posed of alumni of the New England area, will consider character and 
personal qualities as well as the scholastic record and need of the 
applicant. 

Morris Leeds Scholarships — Established in 1953 by the Board 
of Managers of the College in memory of Morris E. Leeds, a member 
of the Class of 1888 and chairman of the Board from 1928 to 1945. 

Max Leuchter Memorial Scholarship — Established in December 
1949, in memory of Max Leuchter, father of Ben Z. Leuchter of the 
Class of 1946. One scholarship, awarded at the discretion of the faculty, 
on the basis of character, scholarship, and financial need. 

Archibald Macintosh Scholarship Fund — This fund was estab- 

190 



_ 



lished in 1959 and later increased by admirers and friends of Archibald 
Macintosh, and is used preferably for scholarship purposes. 

Joseph L. Markley Memorial Scholarship — One scholarship, 
awarded at the discretion of the faculty, on the basis of character, 
scholarship, and financial need. 

Sarah Marshall Scholarship — One scholarship. 

Charles McCaul Fund — Established in 1951 by Mary N. Weath- 
erly. One or more scholarships which shall be awarded to students who 
show special interest in the field of religion and the social sciences. 

William Maul Measey Trust — Established in 1952 by the late 
William Maul Measey, a friend of the College, who was deeply inter- 
ested in education and who wished to help students of high quality in 
the pursuit of their education. 

J. Kennedy Moorhouse Memorial Scholarship — One scholar- 
ship, intended for the member of the freshman class who shall appear 
best fitted to uphold at Haverford the standard of character and conduct 
typified by the late J. Kennedy Moorhouse of the Class of 1900 — "a 
man modest, loyal, courageous, reverent without sanctimony; a lover of 
hard play and honest work; a leader in clean and joyous living." 

W. LaCoste Neilson Scholarship — Established in 1957 by the 
family and friends of W. LaCoste Neilson, Class of 1901, in his memory. 
The income is to be used for the payment of one or more scholarships 
at the discretion of the College, preference if possible being given to 
students taking scientific or practical courses rather than those in the 
field of the arts. 

Scholarship of the New York Haverford Society — Established 
in 1963 for a resident of the New York area who is a member of the 
freshman class. 

Paul W. Newhall Memorial Scholarship — One scholarship. 

Inazo Nitobe Scholarship Fund — Established in November, 1955, 
under the will of Anna H. Chace, the income to be used and applied 
for the education at Haverford College of a Japanese student who shall 
be a resident of Japan at the time of his appointment to such scholar- 
ship and for his traveling expenses from and to Japan and his living 
expenses during the period he shall hold such scholarship. 

The Jose Padin Puerto Rican Scholarship Fund — The fund was 

191 



established in October 1966 by a gift from Paulina A. Padm in memory 
of her husband, Dr. Jose Padin, of the Class of 1907. As both Dr. and 
Mrs. Padin had their origins in Puerto Rico, the donor desires that this 
fund should benefit deserving students from that island. The amount of 
the scholarships, their number and the method of locating such deserv- 
ing students is to be in the hands of the administration of the College. 
It is the principal wish of the donor that Puerto Rico should profit by 
the education of its students at Haverford College and that this fund 
should be a perpetual memorial for Jose Padin, who during his lifetime 
did so much for education in his native land. 

Louis Jaquette Palmer Memorial Scholarship — This scholar- 
ship is awarded on application, preferably to a member of the freshman 
class who, in the opinion of a committee representing the donors and 
the President of the College, shall give evidence of possessmg the 
qualities of leadership and constructive interest in student and com- 
munity welfare which his friends observed in Louis Jaquette Palmer of 
the Class of 1894. 

Reader's Digest Foundation Scholarship Fund — This fund was 
established in July 1965 by a grant of $2500 from the Reader's Digest 
Foundation, and substantially increased in 1966 and 1967. The income 
only is to be used for scholarship purposes. 

Scott Award — Established in 1955 by the Scott Paper Company 
Foundation. A two-year scholarship award for the junior and senior 
years, to be given to that student who is planning to embark upon a 
business career and who is judged by both students and faculty as an 
outstanding member of the sophomore class. 

Geoffrey Silver Memorial Scholarship^ — One scholarship, avail- 
able to a public school graduate in this general area who may enter 
Haverford. 

Daniel B. Smith Scholarship — One scholarship, awarded in the 
discretion of the faculty, as an annual scholarship for some young man 
needing financial aid in his college course. Preference is to be given to 
a descendant of Benjamin R. Smith, if any such should apply. 

Jonathan M. Steere Scholarship Fund — Established in Decern- ^ 
ber, 1948, by Jonathan M. Steere of the Class of 1890. The scholarship | 
is intended primarily for a graduate of Moses Brown School, Provi- 
dence, R. L, who shall be a member of the Society of Friends. 

Summerfield Foundation Scholarship Fund — Established in 

192 



li 



February, 1956. One scholarship, awarded at the discretion of the 
faculty, on the basis of character, scholarship, and financial need. 

William Graham Tyler Memorial Scholarship — Founded in 
1949 in memory of William Graham Tyler of the Class of 1858. Prefer- 
ence shall be given to students from Oskaloosa, Iowa, or from William 
Penn College, on the basis of character, scholarship, and financial need. 

A. Clement Wild Scholarship — Established May 14, 1951, by 
Mrs. Gertrude T. Wild in memory of her husband, A. Clement Wild of 
the Class of 1899. The income from this fund is to be awarded as a 
scholarship by the College to a deserving student. Preference shall be 
given to an English exchange student or someone in a similar category. 

Isaiah V. Williamson Scholarship — Three scholarships, usually 
awarded to members of the senior and junior classes. 

Caspar Wistar Memorial Scholarship — One scholarship, avail- 
able preferably for sons of parents engaged in Christian service (in- 
cluding secretaries of Young Men's Christian Associations) or students 
desiring to prepare for similar service in America or other countries. 

GiFFORD K. Wright Scholarship Fund — Established in December, 
1955, in memory of Gifford K. Wright of the Class of 1893. 

Edward Yarnall Scholarship — One scholarship. 

Robert Martin Zuckert Memorial Scholarships — Two or 
more scholarships, preference to be given to a native of New York or 
Connecticut who now resides in one of those states. 

PRIZES AND AWARDS 

Alumni Prize for Composition and Oratory — A prize of $50 
was established by the Alumni Association in 1875 to be awarded 
annually for excellence in composition and oratory. Competition is open 
to freshmen and sophomores, but the same man may not receive the 
prize twice. The competition for this prize is administered by the 
Department of English. 

John B. Garrett Prizes for Systematic Reading — A first prize 
of $150 and a second prize of $75 will be given at the end of the 
sophomore, junior, or senior year to the two students who, besides 
creditably pursuing their regular course of study, shall have carried on 
the most profitable program of reading in a comprehensive topic during 
a full college year. 

193 



Candidates for these prizes must register with the chairman of the 
department under whose supervision the work will be performed. The 
department is responsible for guiding the work and, not later than 
April 15, for reporting the achievement to the Committee on Student 
Standing and Programs, for final judgment. Either or both of these 
prizes may be omitted if, in the judgment of the committee, the work 
does not justify an award. 

Interested students should apply directly to a relevant department 
for information. 

Class of 1896 Prizes in Latin and Mathematics — Two prizes 
of $10 each, in books, to be known as the Class of 1896 Prizes in Latin 
and Mathematics, were established by the bequest of Paul D. L Maier 
of the Class of 1896. They are awarded at the end of the sophomore 
year to the students who have done the best work in the departments 
concerned. 

Lyman Beecher Hall Prize in Chemistry — An annual prize of 
$100 was established by the Class of 1898 on the 25th anniversary of 
its graduation, in honor of Lyman Beecher Hall, Professor of Chemistry 
at Haverford College from 1880 to 1917. 

This prize may be awarded to a student who has attained a high 
degree of proficiency in chemistry and who shows promise of contribut- 
ing substantially to the advancement of that science. It may be awarded 
to a junior, to a senior, or to a graduate of Haverford College within 
three years after graduation. It may be awarded more than once to the 
same student, or it may be withheld. 

Class of 1902 Prize in Latin — A prize of $10, in books, is offered 
annually by the Class of 1902 to the freshman whose work in Latin, in 
recitation and examinations combined, shall be the most satisfactory. At 
the discretion of the professor in charge of the department, this prize 
may be omitted in any year. 

Department Prize in Mathematics — A first prize of $30 and a 
second prize of $20 are awarded on the basis of a three-hour examina- 
tion on selected topics in freshman mathematics. The examination is 
held annually on the first Monday after the spring recess, and is open 
to freshmen only. 

Elliston p. Morris and Elizabeth P. Smith Peace Prizes — 

These have been combined into a single competition offering three 

194 



awards of $400, $200 and $100 respectively. It is open to all under- 
graduates and to graduate students. 

The prizes are awarded for the best essays bearing on the general 
topic of "Means of Achieving International Peace." Essays should be 
deposited with the Recorder not later than May 1. The judges shall be 
appointed by the President of the College. Prizes will not be awarded, 
if, in the opinion of the judges, a sufficiently high standard of merit has 
not been attained. 

Prizes in Philosophy and Biblical Literature — A first prize of 
$40 and a second prize of $25, in books, are offered annually to the 
students who, in the judgment of the professor in charge, do the most 
satisfactory outside reading in philosophy in connection with the courses 
in that department. 

A first prize of $40 and a second prize of $25, in books, are offered 
annually to the students who, in the judgment of the professor in charge, 
do the most satisfactory reading on the Bible and related subjects. 

Scholarship Improvement Prizes — A first prize of $50 and a 
second prize of $45 are awarded at the end of the senior year to the 
two students who, in the opinion of the judges appointed by the Presi- 
dent of the College, show the most steady and marked improvement in 
scholarship during their college course. 

Founders Club Prize — A prize of $25 is awarded annually by 
the Founders Club to the freshman who is judged to have shown the 
best attitude toward College activities and scholastic work. 

S. P. LiPPiNCOTT Prize in History — A prize of $100 is offered 
annually for competition in the Department of History under the 
following general provisions: 

First — Competition is open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who 
have taken or are taking work in the Department of History. 

Second — The prize shall not be awarded twice to the same student. 

Third — The prize may be withheld in any year if, in the opinion of 
the judges, a sufficiently high standard of merit has not been attained. 

Fourth — An essay of not less than 5000 words, written in con- 
nection with course or honors work in history, or independently of 
course work, treating a subject selected with the approval of a member 
of the History Department, shall be submitted as evidence of scholarly 

195 



ability in the collection and presentation of historical material. It shall 
be typewritten and deposited with the Recorder not later than May 1. 

Newton Prize in English Literature — A prize of $50 estab- 
Hshed by A. Edward Newton may be awarded annually on the basis of 
final honors in English, provided that the work of the leading candidate, 
in the judgment of the English Department, merits this award. 

William Ellis Scull Prize — A prize of $50, established in 1929 
by William Ellis Scull, Class of 1883, is awarded annually to the upper- 
classman who shall have shown the greatest achievement in voice and 
in the articulation of the English language. This prize is administered 
by the English Department. 

George Peirce Prize in Chemistry or Mathematics — A prize 
of $50 in memory of Dr. George Peirce, Class of 1903, is offered annu- 
ally to a student of chemistry or mathematics who has shown marked 
proficiency in either or both of these studies and who intends to follow 
a profession which calls for such preparation. Preference is to be given 
to a student who has elected organic chemistry, and failing such a 
student, to one who has elected mathematics or some branch of chem- 
istry other than organic. Should there be two students of equal promise, 
the one who is proficient in Greek shall be given preference. The prize 
is offered, however, exclusively for students who have expressed the 
intention of engaging in research. 

Edmund J. Lee Memorial Award — Classmates of Edmund Jen- 
nings Lee, Class of 1942, who lost his life in the service of his country, 
have established in his memory a fund, the income from which is to be 
given annually to that recognized undergraduate organization which has 
contributed most toward the furtherance of academic pursuits, extra- 
curricular activities, spiritual growth, or college spirit in individuals or 
in the College as a whole during the year. The award is to be used in 
continuing to render such service. 

William W. Baker Prize in Greek — A prize of $25, in books, 
established in 1954 in memory of William W. Baker, professor of 
Greek at Haverford College from 1904 to 1917, is given in the study 
of Greek, and is administered by the Classics Department. 

KuRZMAN Prize in Political Science — A prize of $125, estab- 
lished in 1958 by Harold P. Kurzman, is awarded annually for the 
senior who has performed best and most creatively in political science, 
except when in the judgment of the department no student has done 
work of sufficient merit to warrant such award. 

196 



Hamilton Watch Award — A Hamilton watch is awarded to that 
senior, majoring in one of the natural sciences, mathematics, or engi- 
neering, who has most successfully combined proficiency in his major 
field of study with achievements, either academic or extracurricular or 
both, in the social sciences or humanities. 

John G. Wallace Class Night Award — A silver cup to be 
awarded annually to the best actor in the Class Night performances. 

Prizes for Excellence in the French Language — The French 
Department may recommend to the Associate Dean the names of two 
students in French 022 who, in its opinion, are worthy of the award 
of a full scholarship to the Summer in Avignon Program of Bryn Mawr 
College (covering all but transportation). These two scholarships will 
be awarded upon approval of the Associate Dean and acceptance of 
the applicant by Bryn Mawr College, as the First and Second Prize for 
Excellence in the French Language. 

The Varsity Cup — An award given to the member of the Senior 
Class who excels in leadership, sportsmanship, and athletic ability. 

Stephen H. Miller Memorial Award — His friends have estab- 
lished in his memory an award which is to be given to that graduating 
political science major who best exemplifies the ideal of political in- 
volvement and social service expressed in the life and career of 
Stephen H. Miller, 1962, who lost his life while serving his country 
and his fellow man, taking part in village development in Vietnam. 



197 



^. 




IIMDEX 



IIMDEX 



PAGE 

Academic Buildings 35-37 

Academic Council 27 

Academic Flexibility 55 

Accident Insurance 42, 180 

Administration 20-22 

Admission 40-41 

Admission — Advanced Standing .. 41 

Admission — Early Decision 41 

Admission — Examinations 40 

Admission — Requirements for ... 40 
Admission — Transfer Students ... 41 

Advanced Standing 41 

African Studies 64 

Alumni Association 200 

Alumni Clubs 201-204 

Alumni Representatives . . 41, 205-212 

Anthropology 160-164 

Application for Admission 40 

Applied Science 95-97 

Arboretum 32 

Art Collection 39 

Artists-in-Residence 183 

Arts, Fine 105-107 

Astronomy 37, 71-73 

Athletic Facilities 177 

Audited Courses 60 

Autograph Collection, 

Charles Roberts 35 

Bachelor's Degree 49-54 

Barclay Hall 38 

Biology 37, 74-79 

Board of Managers 6-9 

Board Fees 42-43 

Bookstore 39 

Borton Wing 33 

Brown, Mary Farnum, Fund 26 

Brown, Thomas Wistar, Library . . 32 
Bryn Mawr College, 

Cooperation with ... 50-51, 59, 63 



Buildings 35-39 

Business Office 39 

Calendar 4-5 

Campus 31-39 

Campus Map Inside rear cover 

Center for Nonviolent 

Resolution of Conflict 64-65 

Chase Hall 35 

Chemistry 36, 81-85 

Classical Civilization 89 

Classics 87-89 

Collections, Library 32-35 

College Calendar 4-5 

College Entrance Board Tests . .40-41 

College History 31 

College Honors 54-55 

College Purpose 30 

College Responsibility 43 

Comfort Hall 38 

Committees — Board of Managers 8-9 

Committees — Faculty 27 

Community Concern 184 

Community Relations Committee 184 

Comprehensive Examination 53 

Computing Center 37-38 

Concentrated Program 56 

Conflicting Courses 59 

Cope Field 177 

Correspondence Directory 218 

Corporation — Officers of 6 

Corporation — Standing 

Nominating Committee 6 

Counseling Services 181 

Course Changes 60 

Course Intensification 50 

Course Load 50, 57 

Course Numbering System 70 

Courses of Instruction 67-177 

Crawford Mezzanine 33 



214 



\ 



PAGE 

Curriculum 45-67 

Degree, Bachelor's 49 

Developmental Reading 58 

Diets, Special 43 

Dining Center 39 

Diplomat-in-Residence 136 

Distribution Requirement 50-51 

Dormitories 38-39 

Drama Club 183 

Drinker, Henry S., Music Center . . 36 

Dropped Course 61 

Early-Decision — Admission .... 41 

Economics 90-93 

Educational Involvement 

Program 170-171 

Electives, Free 51 

Electives, Non-Academic 51 

Endowed Fellowships for 

Haverford Graduates 186 

Endowed Scholarships 186-193 

Endowment 43 

Engineering and 

Applied Science 95-97 

English 99-104 

Enrichment and 

Independent Study 56 

Evaluation of Academic 

Performance 60-62 

Examinations for Admission . . . 40-41 

Expenses 42-43 

Faculty, Members of 12-20 

Faculty, Standing Committees of . . 27 

Fees and Special Charges 40-43 

Fellowships, Scholarships 

and Prizes 186-197 

Fellowships, T. Wistar Brown .... 66 

Field House 177 

Fifth Day Meeting 31 

Final Honors 54-55 



Financial Aid 43-44, 186-193 

Fine Arts 105-107 

Five- Year Program 58 

Flexibility Program 55-58 

Foreign Languages. . 45-46, 51, 63-64 

Founders Club 67 

Founders Hall 35-39 

Free Electives 51 

French 154-157 

French Drama Collection 35 

French House 39 

Freshman Inquiry 48 

Freshman Program 47-48 

Freshman Seminars . . 47-48, 166-169 

General Courses 109-110 

German 110-113 

Gest Center for Religion 65-66 

Government, Student 181-183 

Grades, Courses Taken Without ... 62 

Grades, Policy on Release 61 

Graduate Fellowships 66, 186 

Greek 88 

Guidelines for Liberal 

Education 45-46 

Gummere Hall 38 

Gummere-Morley Room 33 

Gymnasium 177 

Hall, Lyman Beecher, Building ... 36 

Handbook 183 

Harris, J. Rendel, Collection 35 

Harvey Peace Research Room ... 33 
Haverford-Bryn Mawr News .... 183 

Health Program 180 

Hilles Laboratory 36, 39 

Hires Room 33 

History 115-118 

History of College 31 

Honor Pledge 182 



215 



PAGE 

Honor Societies 66-67 

Honor System 30, 181-183 

Honors 54-55 

Housing 38-39, 42-43 

Humanities 109 

Humanities, Social Sciences 

and Natural Sciences 46 

Independent Study 56 

Independent Study Courses 54 

Infirmary 39, 180 

Intercollegiate Cooperation 63 

Intercollegiate Sports 176 

Interdepartmental Program 56 

Jones Hall 38 

Jones, Rufus M., Collection on 

Mysticism 34 

Jones, Rufus M., Study 33 

Junior- Year Language Program 63-64 

Laboratory Courses 60 

Language Program, Junior- Year 63-64 
Languages, Foreign 45-46, 51, 63-64 

Late Papers 62 

Latin 88-89 

Lecture and Laboratory Courses . . 60 
Lectures and Lectureships . .23-26, 64 

Leeds Hall 38 

Library 32-35 

Library Collections 34-35 

Library Staff 22 

Lincoln Family Foundation Fund. . 26 

Linguistics 109 

Lloyd Hall 38 

Loan Fund, Student 43-44 

Location, College 31-32 

Lockwood, Dean P., Collection ... 35 

Lunt Hall 38-39 

Lyman Beecher Hall Building .... 36 
Magill, James P., Library 32 



PAGE 

Major Concentration 52-54 

Managers, Board of 6-9 

Mathematics 46, 1 19-121 

Medical Staff 21-22 

Meeting, Friends 31 

Microforms Room 33 

Modern Dance Club 183 

Monthly Payment of College Bills . . 43 

Morley, Christopher, Alcove 33 

Morley, Christopher, Collection . . 35 
Morris Cricket Library 

and Collection 33 

Music 39, 123-125, 183 

Music Center, 

Henry S. Drinker 36 

Music Collection 39 

Non-Academic Requirements 

and Electives 51, 174, 176 

Numbering System 70 

Observatory 37 

Organizations, Student 183-184 

Painting 106-107 

Phi Beta Kappa Society 66 

Philips Collection 35 

Philips Visitors (Fund) . . . 23-25, 64 

Philips Wing 33 

Philosophy 127-131 

Photography 106 

Physical Education 175-177 

Physics 36, 132-135 

Placement Service 44 

Political Science 136-143 

Post-Baccalaureate 

Fellowship Program 66 

Princeton University, 

Language Study at 63-64 

Prizes and Awards 193-197 

Professions, Preparation for . . . 58-59 



216 



4 



PAGE 

Psychology 37, 144-149 

Publications, Student 183 

Quaker Collection 34 

Radio Station WHRC 39 

Record 183 

Regulations, Academic 59-62 

Religion 150-153 

Residence Fee 42-43 

Residence Halls 38-39 

Resources 32-39 

Rhoads Fund 26 

Roberts Autograph Collection .... 35 

Roberts Hall 39 

Romance Languages 154-158 

Room and Board 42-43 

Russian 159-160 

Scholarships, 

Application for 43-44, 186 

Scholarships, List of 186-193 

Science Facilities 36-37 

Sculpture 106-107 

Serendipity Day Camp 184 

Sharpless Gallery 33 

Sharpless Hall 36-37 

Shipley Lectures (Fund) 26 

Snack Bar 39 

Social Action Committee 184 

Social Science General Courses . . 110 

Society of Friends 30-31 

Sociology and Anthropology 160-164 

Spanish 157-158 

Special Appointments 19-20 

Special Diets 43 

Special Programs 166-177 

Sports, Intercollegiate 176 

Staff, Administrative 20-22 

Standing Committees of the 

Board of Managers 8-9 



PAGE 

Standing Committees of the 

Faculty 27 

Stokes Hall 36 

Strawbridge Memorial 

Observatory 37 

Strawbridge Seminar Room 33 

Student Activities (Unit) Fee 42 

Student Aid 43-44 

Students' Association 181 

Students' Council 181 

Student Government 181-183 

Student Organizations 

and Publications 183-184 

Student Services and Activities 179-184 

Study Abroad 63 

Swarthmore College, 

Cooperation with 63 

"Term Away" 57 

Thesis Program 56 

Tobias Collection 34 

Transfer Students 41 

Treasure Room, Library 33-34 

Tuition 42-43 

Union 39 

Unit Fee 42 

University of Pennsylvania, 

Cooperation with 63 

University of Pennsylvania, 

Language Study at 64 

Urban Studies 172-173 

Varsity Sports 176 

Visiting Committee 9 

Visiting Faculty on 

Special Funds 23-26 

Visitors and Lectures 64 

Walton Field 166 

Williams House 39 

Woolman Walk 32 

Yarnall House 36 



217 



CORRESPONDENCE DIRECTORY 

For information on: Write to: 

Academic and Faculty Affairs Gerhard E. Spiegler 

Provost and Dean of the Faculty 

Academic Student Affairs David Potter 

Associate Dean of the College 

Admissions and Catalog Requests William W. Ambler 

Director of Admissions 

Alumni Affairs William E. Sheppard 

Director of Alumni Affairs 

Athletics Dana W. Swan, II 

Director of Athletics 

Business Affairs Charles W. Smith 

Vice President for Business Affairs 

Gifts and Bequests Stephen G. Gary 

Vice President for Development 

Medical Matters William W. Lander, M.D. 

College Physician 

Non-Academic Student Affairs James W. Lyons 

Dean of Students 

Public Relations and Press Relations William F. Balthaser 

Director of Public Relations 

Purchasing and Personnel Stephen P. Theophilos 

Assistant Business Manager 

Records and Transcripts Delores Davis 

Recorder 

Scholarships and Loans Wilham W. Ambler 

Director of Admissions 

Student Bills and Scholarship Accounting Marie Stefan 

Accountant 

218 



NOTES 



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Haverford College • Haverford. Pennsylvania 19041 • C215] 649-96 




Haver ford College 



TREASURER'S REPORT 

1970-71 



TREASURER'S REPORT 1970-1971 HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

CONTENTS PAGE 

Report of the Treasurer 4 

Auditor's Report 9 

Balance Sheet 10 

Statement of Changes in Fund Balances and Unexpected Gifts, Grants and Income... 12 

Statement of Operations 14 

Notes to Financial Statements 15 

Statement of Income 16 

Statement of Expenditures 18 

Report on Consolidated Funds 22 

Report on Non-Consolidated Funds 28 

Summary of Consolidated and Non-Consolidated Funds 29 

Classification of Investments 30 

Computation of Market Value of Units 31 

Additions to Funds 32 

William Maul Measey Trust Auditor ' s Report 4.33 

William Maul Measey Trust Statement of Cash Transactions and Book Value 34 



STATED MEETINGS OF THE CORPORATION AND THE MANAGERS 

The annual meeting of The Corporation of Haverford College is held in Tenth Month at 
such time and place as the Board of Managers may determine. The stated meetings of the 
managers will be held on the fourth Sixth-day of First, Third, Fifth, Ninth and 
Eleventh months. 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

PRESENTED AT THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE CORPORATION OF 
HAVERFORD COLLEGE 



October 29, 1971 
TO THE CORPORATION AND THE BOARD OF MANAGERS: 

This year, aside from a brief statement of our operations, 
I propose a somev/hat different annual report dealing with the long 
range view of our financial affairs and going back for several years. 

I regret that I am not able to accompany my report with 
the usual audit statement of Price Vaterhouse and Company. Since 
they have not been able to complete their examination, due primarily 
to the fact that Charles Smith our Vice President for Business 
Affairs, as you know, was on a well deserved leave of absence 
during the summer. I might add that I do not anticipate serious 
difficulties! 

OPERATING STATENENT 

Again this year the college operations for the year 
ending June 30th, showed a deficit of $579,469, of which $466,003 
Mas attributed to interest on borrowed funds and the capital 
payment to the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) 
leaving $113 f 466 attributable to operations at the college; of 
this latter amount $50,000 resulted from the increase in the cost 
of fuel and $43»000 by reason of additional student aid payable 
from our general funds. 

One item of interest in connection with our invested 
funds is the increase in the unit value (market value) of our 
Consolidated Funds to $29.51, from a year ago when it was $26.17. 
There was also a modest, in fact very modest, increase in the unit 
value of income of ^i to $1.35. 



REVIEW OF FINANCIAL PICTURE 

Twenty-five years ago we were for the most part satisfied 
with our operations. Ve frankly considered ourselves, and were 
considered by others, a wealthy institution; we had adequate 
endowment for our enrollment, some four and a half million dollars, 
and for the most part we operated with a small annual surplus, 
or a minor deficit, which latter would be wiped out oy the next 
year's operations. Even as late as 1958, we had no need for a 
very active annual giving campaign, though we permitted Alumni 
to contribute to Alumni Sustaining Fund, which in that year 
amounted to $14,700, obviously a minor part of a total budget 
of one and a quarter million dollars. Also, by that year, our 
endowment, thanks largely to the bequests of Morris E. Leeds 
and William Pyle Philips, amounted to $14,660,582. 

As a result of a campaign in 1954 and 1955, we raised 
the amount needed for the construction of Leeds Hall, the first 
new dormitory for many years, and for the Field House. 

The financial turning point of the college might almost 
be pinpointed to the year ending in the summer of 1963. Continually 
rising salaries and increased costs of operations had caught up 
with us and even after using all of the $70,000 of accumulated 
income, in a total budget of two million dollars, we had a deficit 
of $30,000. 

Also that year marked the end of a three year campaign 
during which there had been raised almost enough for the completion 
of Stokes Hall and a complete renovation of Sharpless Hall, made 
necessary by the growing biology and psychology departments and 
the removal of the physics department to Stokes. 

That year marked two important decisions; first that we 
must in the future look to annual giving as a substantial 



and very necessary part of our income, and second, that we must 
implement decision to expand, by the construction of more dormitories 
In fact in November of 1963 the agreement with HUD was signed for 
the financing by Federal Funds of Gummere Hall. I might add a 
nostalgic note — at the rate of 3 5/8^. 

The removal of the Chemistry Department to Stokes Hall 
required a complete renovation of the Lyman Beecher Hall Chemistry 
Building into faculty offices — also a fairly expensive procedure. 

Again, by reason of the planned increase of the student 
body, the college was faced with the need for further dormitories 
after Gummere Hall. The students were consulted as they had been 
in the case of the previous dormitories, and approved the plan 
for the suite system which, as you know, we have long had at 
Haverford. Lunt, Comfort and Jones Halls were in due course erected. 
HUD funds had been curtailed by the government and were not available 
for these dormitories and it was decided to raise the necessary funds 
through capital gifts, but unfortunately a falling market severely 
curtailed major gifts and the funds were not forthcoming. As a 
matter of fact a considerable part of the cost of over two million 
dollars had been pledged but the cash was not then in evidence. 
The funds for the construction were provided by a loan from the 
Provident National Bank, I am glad to say at the prime rate — and 
without the need for collateral. 

Meanwhile, a quiet, efficient and most successful drive 
under the leadership of James P. Magill had raised over $2,000,000 
for the complete renovation and enlargement of the library, greatly 
enhancing its beauty and usefulness. 

Another "must" due to the increasing student body, and 
also due to the utter inadequacy of the old dining hall for more 
than 450 students, was an entirely new dining facility. Due to 
the interest and great generosity of T. Kite Stiarpless the funds 

for this approximately $2,500,000 were made available by a gift 

of stock of his company, Technitrol, Inc. Most unfortunately, due 
to the fact that the shares were what is known as ownership stock, 
we were unable to sell it on the market for at least two 



years except by a public offering in accordance with SEC rules 
with its various requirements. Also, unfortunately Technitrol 
just at the time was involved in a serious strike bringing about 
a deficit; the effect, of course, was that the stock ceased to 
be considered a growth stock and rapidly declined to a price of 
approximately $3, from which it has not so far recovered. Here 
I should like to add, emphatically, that these events occurred 
after Kite Sharpless' death and were in no way his fault, and 
further, that for the short time he was a member of the Board 
his interest and sound advice were much valued by the college. 

Thus this large sum had to be assumed by the college 
and we sold securities to raise it. We did this intentionally 
as we, in effect borrowed from ourselves rather than to forever 
mark off some of our unrestricted Funds. I was loath to eliminate 
such Funds from our books, since for the most part, they represented 
gifts of our most devoted and generous donors, and others, whose 
generosity and vision were largely responsible for the progress 
of the college and whose names and Funds, I think we ought to 
perpetuate in our financial reports. We, of course, have to 
pay ourselves interest on the amounts borrowed in order to 
fairly reflect income from all of our Fvinds. It also seemed to 
the Finance Committee that this was a more prudent method of 
procedure than increasing our loan at the bank at a much higher 
interest rate. 

On the brighter side, I am happy to report that as a 
result of strongly led annual giving campaigns, we have each year 
raised larger amounts of money, and this past year total contrib- 
utions amounted to $345,018, the largest amount yet raised and 
almost $50,000 more than last year, also we had the largest number 
of donors contributing. The Board has determined on a strenous 
campaign for $5,000,000 over the next three years to be raised 
from a relatively small group of Alumni and friends, coupled with 
further efforts to increase ajmual giving especially this year 
by a rather exciting challenge program to raise an additional 
$100,000. 



In line with the foregoing decision, the administration 
is undertaking a hard look at our annual budget figures so that we 
may have a truly balanced budget. 

As an example of this realistic financial approach, we 
are proceeding with the construction in the basement of the Dining 
Hall of a student center only so far as we have contributions in hand. 
The same is true for the Founders Annex renovation, financed through 
the generosity of Miriam Thrall. The funds for the Barclay renovation, 
about $624,000 are almost in hand. 

THE COMMON FUND 

One item of special interest this year was the decision 
of the Finance Committee and of the Board to entrust part of our 
funds to The Common Fund. This Fund was started at the instigation 
of the Ford Foundation, for the management of monies turned over 
to it by schools, colleges and universities. The limit is currently 
set at $250,000,000. The Ford Foundation is to pay, during at 
least three years, all costs of administration, custody and financial 
advisors' fees. The Fund opened its accounts as of June 30th of 
this year. We then placed $3,500,000 with the Fund. ($2,000,000 
by the transfer of securities). It appiears to be a good investment 
for at least three reasons: I believe the Ford Foundation wants 
it to succeed, I think the mangement is good, under John Meek, the 
very able Vice President of Dartmouth College, who is Chairman of 
the Board, and the Investment Advisors selected are, I understand, 
among the best in the country. 

Finally I would like to express on behalf of the College 
appreciation for the substantial increases in annual giving, to 
which I have referred, during the past year and urge that we do 
even better this year for we must get ourselves on a firm financial, 
basis. 

Respectfully submitted. 



Price ^\!aterhouse & Co. 

Independence Maj-l West 
Philadeuphia 19106 

October 22, 1971 



To the Board of Managers 

The Corporation of Haverford College 



We have examined the balance sheet of the Corporation of 
Haverford College as of June 30, 1971 and the related statements of 
operations and changes in fund balances and unexpended gifts, grants 
and income for the year then ended. Our examination was made in 
accordance with generally accepted auditing standards and accordingly 
included such tests of the accounting records and such other auditing 
procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances, including 
confirmation of marketable securities by correspondence with the 
depositary. It was impracticable for us to extend our examination of 
contributions received beyond accounting for amounts so recorded. 

The College follows the practice of writing off property 
and plant additions as their cost is funded. Accordingly, the cost 
of College property, other than certain residences which are included 
in endowment fund assets and unfunded construction costs, is not 
reflected in the accompanying statements. 

In our opinion, except that the cost of College property is 
not fully reflected, as described in the preceding paragraph, the 
accompanying financial statements present fairly the financial posi- 
tion of the Corporation of Haverford College at June 30, 1971 and the 
results of its operations and changes in fund balances and unexpended 
gifts, grants and income for the year, in conformity with generally 
accepted accounting principles applied on a basis consistent with that 
of the preceding year. 



\j^;Clc«^VK^fc^<'^-'<^ '^^ 



^ 



¥ 



Assets 



General fund 



THE CORPORATIOM 
Bal; 
June 30, 



1971 



1970 



Cash 



$ 111,140 $ 651,496 



Accounts receivable - Faculty and students 116,220 129,125 
- Others 36,137 54,377 



Bookstore inventory, at cost 



28,794 



24,281 



Prepaid expenses and other assets 



85,200 



18,437 



Deferred charges 



Loan funds - Note 2 

Cash 

Accrued interest receivable 

Loans to students 



Endowment fund 

Marketable securities, at cost (market 
value $13,856,048 in 1971, $15,128,214 
in 1970) 

The Common Fund, at cost 

Mortgages 

College real estate - at cost less amor- 
tization of $257,624 in 1971 and 
$236,712 in 1970 

Other investments 

Advances to other funds - Note 3 
General fund 
Loan fund 
Plant fund 



Plant fund 



44,138 



39,744 



Unfunded costs of completed construction 
Construction in progress (additional 

commitments approximate $340,000) 
Joint Computer Center 



? 


421,629 


$ 


917,460 


$ 


2,372 

15,437 

425,121 


$ 


38 

12,939 

354,440 


$ 


442,930 


$ 


367,417 



$13,487,928 $17,167,000 
3,528,091 

367,792 375,525 



1,136,504 
71,536 



1,139,528 
60,146 



18,591,851 18,742,199 

1,278,522 1,149,268 

298,150 224,195 

4,850,512 3,992,728 

.6,427,184 5,366,191 

$25,019,035 $24,108,390 



$ 7,782,206 $ 7,456,986 



11,699 
191,607 



142,379 
188,363 



$ 7,985,512 $ 7,787,728 
$33,869,106 $33,180,995 



10: 



ERFORD COLLEGE 



Liabilities and Fund Balances 



General fund 



Liabilities 

Accounts payable 
Accrued expenses 
Advance receipts 
Advance from endovment fund 



Note 3 



Unexpended gifts, grants and income - Note 1 
Donations for special purposes 
Special purpose endowment income 
Post-baccalaureate program 
Faculty and sponsored research 

General fund balance 
Restricted 
Income reserve (deficit) 



Loan funds 

Advance from endowment fund - Note 3 

Loan fund balances - Note 2 
Endowment fund 



June 30, 



1971 



1970 



99,406 $ 200,641 

189,240 185,841 

47,541 29,628 

1,278,522 1,149,268 

1,614,709 1.565,378 



612,996 

51,215 

41,560 

(268,808) 



325,647 
80,888 
25,263 

(46,775) 



436,963 



385,023 



59,791 77,423 

(1,689,834) (1,110,364 ) 

(1,630,043) (1,032.941 ) 

$ 421,629 $ 917,460 

$ 298,150 $ 224,195 

144,780 143,222 

$ 442,930 $ 367,417 



Endowment fund principal (including 
realized gains on non-consolidated 
investments) 



$16,990,079 $17,097,207 



Undistributed gains on consolidated investments 



8,005,756 6,987,983 
24,995,835 24,085,190 



Funds functioning as endowment 



Plant fund 



23,200 



23,200 



Demand notes payable to banks at prime and 

l/27o above prime rate 
3-5/8°/, Housing and Home Finance Agency 

dormitory mortgage bonds, due through 2013 
Advance from endowment fund - Note 3 



$25,019,035 $24,108,390 

$ 2,325,000 $ 2,975,000 

810,000 820,000 

4.850.512 3,992.728 

$ 7,985,512 $ 7,787,728 

$33,869,106 $33,180,995 



11 



THE CORPORATION OF HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

Statement of Changes in Fund Balances and Unexpended 
Gifts, Grants and Income 

Year Ended June 30, 1971 



Restricted 
fund 
balance 



Income 

reserve 

(deficit) 



Donations 
for special 
purposes 



Balance - July 1, 1970 

Net decrease from 
operations 

Restricted gifts, grants 
and income - development 
program 

- other 

Realized gains (net) 

Donations and transfers 
to principal 

Interfund transfers 

Restricted gifts, grants 
and endowment income 
expended in current year 

Net interest income 

(expense) for the year 

Life interest payments 

Special purpose funds 

liquidated or transferred 

Miscellaneous transfers 

Applied to unfunded 
construction 

Computer center capital 
costs 

Transfer of computer 

center cost to plant fund 

Balance - June 30, 1971 



$ 77,423 



(20,209) 



2,577 



$(1,110,364) 
(579,470) 



$325,647 



152,416 

905,971 



(5,009) 
(457,005) 



12,712 
(321,736) 



$ 59,791 $(1,689,834) $612,996 



12 



General Fund 



Special purpose 

endowment 

income 



$ 80,888 



Post-Bacca- 
laureate 
program 

(Note 1) 

$ 25,263 



Faculty and Loan Endowment 
sponsored fund fund 
research balance principal 



$ (46,775) $143,222 $24,085,190 



419,849 



(13,399) 



243,395 



317,553 



905,682 
72,276 



5,009 



(413,898) 



(227,098) 



(539,586) 



(64,861) 



(3,451) 



42,804 
(168) 



(67,313) 



3,244 
(3.244) 



$ 51,215 



$ 41,560 



$(268,808) $144,780 $24,995,835 



13 



THE CORPORATION OF HAVERFORD COLLEGE 



Statement of Operations 










Year ended 


June 30, 








1971 




1970 




General 


Restricted 








sources 


sources 


Total 


Total 




(Note 1) 




Income 










Student fees 


$1,729,805 




$1,729,805 


$1,491,276 


Endowments and trusts 


838,372 


$ 413,898 


1,252,270 


1,278,207 


Gifts and grants 


240,605 


991,624 


1,232,229 


1,165,427 


Auxiliary enterprises 


1,060,658 




1,060,658 


909,617 


Rental of facilities 










and other 


153,625 


25,176 


178,801 


183,655 


Post- baccalaureate 










program - Note 1 








196,726 




4,023,065 


1,430,698 


5,453,763 


5,224,908 


Expenses 










Educational and general 










Administration 


306,388 


72,166 


378,554 


377,357 


Student services 


244,880 


9,120 


254,000 


242,743 


Staff benefits 


309,215 


27,288 


336,503 


318,642 


General institutional 


160,397 


79,629 


240,026 


288,292 


Instruction 


1,154,920 


161,845 


1,316,765 


1,187,996 


Libraries 


175,840 


127,978 


303,818 


273,814 


Maintenance and 










operations 


608,817 


3,859 


612,676 


572,558 


Sponsored research 


5,000 


563,423 


568,423 


550,742 


Computer center 


30,817 


4,967 


35,784 


73,532 




2,996,274 


1,050,275 


4,046,549 


3,885,676 


Auxiliary enterprises 


1,034,740 


3,017 


1,037,757 


852,295 


Student aid 


105,518 


377,406 


482,924 


433,154 


Post- baccalaureate 










program - Note 1 








196,726 




4,136,532 


1,430,698 


5,567,230 


5,367,851 


Net deficit resulting 










from college operations 


(113,467) 




(113,467) 


(142,943) 


Interest expense - 










general and plant 










funds - Note 3 


(456,003) 




(456,003) 


(425,311) 


Amortization of mortgage 










principal 


(10,000) 




(10,000) 


(10,000) 


Net decrease in general 










fund balance - Note 1 


$ (579,470) 




$ (579,470) 


$ (578.254) 



14 



THE CORPORATION OF HAVERFORD COLLEGE 



Notes to Financial Statements 



Note 1 - Unexpended gifts, grants and income 

The College follows the practice of reflecting restricted 
gifts, grants and endowment income in the statement of operations 
only to the extent of expenditures from such funds during the year. 
The unexpended balances are increased or decreased by the differences 
between restricted amounts received and those actually expended in 
each year. This method of reporting is generally acceptable for 
colleges . 

In 1971, the College ceased to administer the Post- 
Baccalaureate program and, accordingly, the funds expended during the 
year ended June 30, 1971 are not included in the statement of operations, 

Note 2 - Loan funds 

Loan funds comprise the Class of 1934 Revolving Loan Fund, 
established in 1959 by gifts from the Class of 1934 (100% participation) 
in the amount of $10,784, and the Haverford College Loan Fund 
established in 1926. At June 30, 1971 pertinent information 
as to each fund is as follows: 



Student loans outstanding 
Advance from endowment fund 
Fund balance 

The student loans outstanding bear interest at varying rates 
and are payable ten years after the student completes his formal 
education. Of the total loans outstanding at June 30, 1971 , balances 
aggregating $45,811 are currently payable. 

Note 3 - Interest expense 

Interest is charged on interfund advances from the 
endowment to the general and plant funds at 4-l/27o which approximates 
the average rate of return on endowment fund investments. The 
advance to the loan fund bears interest at the rate of 4%. 

The College follows the practice of capitalizing interest 
relating to income -producing properties while such properties are 
under construction or renovation. Accordingly, interest charges of 
$10,000 and $65,000 have been capitalized in 1971 and 1970 respectively. 

15 



Class of 
1934 


1926 
fund 

$316,154 


Total 


$108,967 


$425,121 


68,376 


229,774 


298,150 


42,865 


101,915 


144,780 



THE CORPORATION OF HAVERFORD COLLEGE 
Detailed Report of the College 



Statement of Income 



30 June 1971 



Unrestricted 



Restricted 



1. Educational and General 



$1,232,747.15 

132,834.79 

72,625.56 

148.095.00 



$1,586,302.50 

124,382.50 

19.119.64 



$1,729,804.64 



A. Student Fees 

Tuition 

Cash 

Scholarship and 
General Funds 

Wm. Maul Measey Trust 

Donations 

Unit Fee 
Other Fees 
Total Student Fees 

B. Endowment Income 

From Unrestricted Funds 
From Restricted Funds 

Library 

Special 
Stock. Dividends 
Total Endowment Income 

C. Gifts and Grants 

Alumni 

Business Corporations 

Foundations 

Other 

Donations 

Sponsored Research 
Total Gifts and Grants 

D. Organized Activity 

Computer Center 

E. Other Sources 

Rental of Facilities 
and Miscellaneous 

Total Educational and General $2,962,407.01 



$ 833,463.64 



4.908.01 



$ 838,371.65 



$ 214,473.21 
26,132.43 



$ 240,605.64 



$ 4.742.47 



$ 148.882.61 



$ 35,252.57 
162,378.72 



$ 197,631.29 



$ 19,525.00 
113,761.42 

297,939.20 
540, 045. 4> 



$ 971,271.07 



Total 



$1,232,747.15 

132,834.79 

72,625.56 

148.095.00 



$1,586,302.50 

124,382.50 

19.119.64 



$1,729,804.64 



$ 833,463.64 

35,252.57 

162,378.72 

4.908.01 



$1,036,002.94 



$ 214,473.21 

45,657.43 

113.761.42 

297,939.20 
540.045.45 



$1,211,876.71 



>6, 967.00 $ 9.709,47 



20,209.44 $ 169,092.05 



$1,194,078.80 



$4,156,485.81 



16 



Statement of Income (Continued) 



30 June 1971 



11. Auxiliary Enterprises 

Athletics 

Dormitories and Dining 
Room 

Faculty Housing 

Bookstore 

Infirmary 

Coop 

Total Auxiliary Enterprises 

Ul. Student Aid 

Scholarships and Fellow- 
ships 

Prizes 

Employment - Work Study 

Total Student Aid 



TOTAL INCOME 



Unrestricted 

$ 252.50 

808.814.76 
95,877.90 

153,006.45 
1,606.79 
1.100.00 



Restricted 



$1,060,658.40 



$4,023,065.41 



$ 213,493.77 

2,773.00 

20,352.68 



$ 236,619.45 



$1,430,698.25 



Total 

252.50 

808,814.76 
95,877.90 

153,006.45 
1,606.79 
1.100.00 



$1,060,658.40 



$ 213,493.77 

2,773.00 

20,352.68 



$ 236,619.45 



$5,453,763.66 



17 



Statement of Expenditures 



30 June 1971 



Educational and General 
Administration 

A-1. Aditdnistratlon 

President's Office 
Provost's Office 
Ad Hoc Committee 

A-2. Financial 

Treasurer's Office 
Development Office 
Business Office 
Total Administration 

B. General Expenses 
B-1. Student Services 
Admissions 
Registrar 
Dean of College 
Dean of Students 
Buildings and Grounds 
Guidance Counsellor 
Student Activities 
Total Student Services 

B-2. Staff Benefits 

Faculty 

TIAA 

Social Security 
Medical Plan 
Disability Insurance 
Tuition Grants 
Moving Expenses 
House Allowances 
Mon-Faculty 
TIAA 

Social Security 
Medical Plan 
Tuition Grants 



Unrestricted 



70,152.86 

40,210.22 

2,235.14 

30,657.21 

45,919.91 

117.212.56 



$ 306,387.90 



69,941.16 
16,719.84 
22,838.70 
30,477.65 
23,254.62 
25,541.37 
56.106.52 



$ 244,879.86 



123,229.38 

36,274.43 

14,269.66 

3,791.28 

14,082.26 

3,276.19 

6,000.00 

48,218.60 

34,938.23 

6,559.69 

4,053.34 



Restricted 



$ 10,142.28 



62,023.71 



$ 72,165.98 



420.10 



7,500.00 



1.200.00 



9,120.10 



5,058.00 

1,888.32 

132.00 



Total 



80,295.14 

40,210.22 

2,235.14 

30,657.21 
107.943.62 
117.212.56 



$ 378,553.89 



70,361.26 
16,719.84 
22,838.70 
30,477.65 
30.754.62 
25,541.37 
57.306.52 



$ 253,999.96 



128.287.38 

38,162.75 

14,401.66 

3.791.28 

14.082.26 

3,276.19 

6,000.00 

48.218.60 

34,938.23 

6.559.69 

4,053.34 



18 



Stateneot of Expenditures (Continued ) 

Unrestricted 
Pensions 

Disability Insurance 
House Allowances 
Total Staff Benefits 



30 June 1971 



$ 12,187.A0 
1,135.19 
1,200.00 



$309,215.65 



General Institutional 
Expenses 

Alumni Association 

Alunnl Office 

Public Relations Office 

Coinmencement and Parents 
Day 

Printing 

Subscriptions and 
Memberships 

Mail and Switchboard 
Service 

Insurance (General) 

Speakers 

Entertainment 

Addressograph Room 

Visiting Committee 

Other Expenses 

Total General Institu- 
tional Expwises 

Total General Expenses 

Instruction 
Salaries 

Supplies and Services 
Faculty Secretaries 



Telephone and 
Telegraph 

New Programs 

F»xd Program in the 
Humanities 

Total Instruction 



7,940.90 
26,827.13 
35,481.73 

9,132.88 
25,178.09 

9,654.90 

15,582.67 

17,974.31 

533.77 

2,636.77 

5,827.77 



^1,016,445.10 
68,082.13 
41,401.01 

10,582.81 
4,402.00 

14,006.41 



Restricted 

$ 20,209.44 



$ 27,287.'76 



$ 7,662.02 

2,000.00 
39,851.99 



$ 103,745.02 
44,069.23 



24.80 



14,006.40 



Total 
$ 32,396.84 
1,135.19 
1,200.00 



$ 336,503.41 



7,940.90 
26,827.13 
35,481.73 

9,132.88 
32,840.11 

9,654.90 

17,582.67 

17,974.31 

40,385.76- 

2,636.77 

5,827.77 



33.32 
3,592.18 


4,454.42 
25,661.08 




4,487.74 
29,253.26 


$160,396.42 


$ 79,629.51 


$ 


240,025.93 


$714,491.93 


$ 116,037.37 


$ 


830,529.30 



$1,120,190.12 

112,151.36 

41,401.01 

10,607.61 
4,402.00 

28,012.81 



$1,154,919.46 



$ 161,845.45 



$1,316,764.91 



19 



Statement of Expenditures (Continued ) 



30 June 1971 



F. 



Organized Activities 

Computer Center 
Sponsored Research 

General 

African Studies 

Biology 

Chealatry 

Economics 

Astronooy 

Psychology 

Physics 

Political Science 

Sociology 

Faculty Research 

Total Sponsored 
Research 

Libraries 



Unrestricted 



1 ^n,flif^.<sn 



Restricted 



Total 



$ 4.967.00 $ 35>7P3.60 



18,557.70 

1,437.41 

206,996.54 

8,717.59 

6,729.24 

50,303.64 

14,455.28 

23,162.02 

24,874.37 

184,352.62 



18,557.70 

1,437.41 

206,996.54 

8,717.59 

6,729.24 

50,303.64 

14,455.28 

23,162.02 

24,874.37 

184,352.62 



$ 


5,000.00 




23,836.20 




28.836.20 


$ 


5,000.00 


$ 


563,422.61 


$ 


568,422.61 





Salaries 


$ 


147,784.03 


$ 


11,583. 


.06 


$ 


159,367.09 




Operating Expenses 




14,055.96 










14,055.96 




Book Blading and 
Periodicals 

Total Libraries 
Maintenance and Operati 




14,000.00 




116,395. 


,46 




130,395.46 




$ 


175,839.99 


$ 


127,978. 


,52 


$ 


303,818.51 


6. 


on 














C-1. 


Plant 


















Supervision 


$ 


52,932.75 








$ 


52,932.75 




Janitorial Services 




100,631.79 










100,631.79 




Repairs to Buildings 




116,448.13 










116,448.13 




Equipaent 




2,898.52 










2,898.52 




Water, Heat, Light 
Power 




117,003.68 










117,003.68 




Grounds 




78,395.86 


$ 


3,858 


.30 




82,254.16 




WatchMn 
Total Plant 

General 




77.510.39 










77.510.39 




$ 


545,821.12 


$ 


3,858, 


.30 


$ 


549,679.42 


G-2. 


















Property Insurance 


$ 


20,268.12 








$ 


20,268.12 




Auto Service 




15,092.96 










15,092.96 




Social Security 




18,657.40 










18,657.40 



20 



Statement of Expenditures (Continued ) 

Unrestricted 



30 June 1971 



$ 5,106.50 
3,871.74 



$ 62,996.72 



Medical Plan 
TIAA 
Total General 

Total Maintenance an d 

Operations $ 608,817.84 

Total Educational and General 



Administration 

11. Auxiliary Enterprises 
Athletics 
Dormitories 
Dining Room 
Faculty Housing 
Infirmary 
B9okstore 
Coop 

Serendipity Day Camp 
Total Auxiliary Enterprises 



127,454.82 

198,457.10 

429,753.62 

98,661.29 

41,820.48 

132,337.52 

255.12 

6,000.00 



$1,034,739.95 



Restricted 



3,016.98 



3,016.98 



Total 

$ 5,106.50 
3.871.74 



$ 62,996.72 



3,858.30 $ 612,676.14 



$2,996,273.72 $1,050,275.24 $4,046,548.96 



$ 130,471.80 

198,457.10 

429,753.62 

98,661.29 

41,820.48 

132,337.52 

255.12 

6,000.00 



$1,037,756.93 



111. 



Student Aid 

Scholarships 
Fellowships 
Employment 
Prizes 

Total Student Aid 



62,335.84 
6,000.00 

35,657.56 
1,525.00 



$ 105,518.40 



$ 353,555.35 

2,000.00 

20,352.68 

1,498.00 



$ 377,406.03 



$ 415,891.19 

8,000.00 

56,010.24 

3,023.00 



$ 482,924.43 



TOTAL EXPENDITURES 



$4,136,532.07 



$1,A30,698.25 



$5,567,230.32 



21 



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30 



THE CORPORATION OF HAVERFQRD COLLEGE 
COMPUTATION OF MARKET VALUE OF UNITS AT JUfJE 30. 1971 



Market value of Consolidated Investments 6/3O/7I 
To Conunon Fund 



Less: additions to funds 7/1/70 - 6/3O/7I 
income to principal 



$58,876 
12.661 



$16,816,997 
1.940.563 

$18,757,560 



71.537 

$18,686,023 



Units outstanding -6/30/70 
Units increased 

Units decreased 

Market value per unit 6/30/7I 



628,421 

5.748 634,169 

1.031 



633.138 
$29.51 



Income per unit 7/1/70 - 6/30/71 - $1.35 



31 



ADDITIONS TO FUNDS 
1970 - 1971 



GENERAL ENDOWMENT FUND 



From: Solon E. Summerfield Fdn, 
Class of 1943 FUND 

From: Various donors 

LOUIS JAQUETTE PALMER SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

From: Triangle Society $ 530.00 

Charles M. Bancroft, M.D. 200.00 

THE SUMMERFIELD FDN. SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

From: Foundation 

CLINTON P. KNIGHT, JR., NEW ENGLAND 
SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

From: *Bequest of Clinton P. Knight, Jr. 

*of bequest $7,500 to Barclay Renovation 

ARCHIBALD MACINTOSH SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

From: Robert G. Wilson Fdn. 
ALPHONSE N. BERTRAND SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

From: Final distribution of legacy 

THE CLASS OF 1970 TENTH ANNIVERSARY 
SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

From: Various members of the Class of 1970 
DUDLEY W. SUMI^ERS SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

From: Anonymous donor 
CARLISLE k BARBARA K, MOORE FUND 

From: Mr. & Mrs. Carlisle Moore (in securities) 
JACOB & EUGENIE BUCKY MEJ^IORIAL FOUNDATION 

From: Foundation {through Robert C. Thomson, Esq.) 
DAVID R. BO\vTN PREMEDICAL FUND 

From: Lewis H. Bowen 
C. C. MORRIS CRICKET LIBRARY FUND 

From: C. Christopher Morris (in securities) 
THE CLASS OF 1964 FACULTY SALARY FUND 

From: David S. Olton 
THE ALBERT HARRIS WILSON AWARD FUND 

From: Walter Penn Shipley, Jr. 



32 



WILLIAM MAUL MEASE Y TRUST 



This trust was established bv VTilliam Maul Measey by agreement dated 
June 27th, 1952, and supplementary agreement dated April 26th, 1956. 
The trust agreements provide that the income shall be granted as aid 
to students without restriction as to sex, race or religious affil- 
iation, in selected secondary schools or colleges, who on the basis 
of character, scholarship and financial situation, merit assistance 
in continuing their education. In secondary schools aid is to be 
given to students who live in the institutions during school terms, 
and not to day students. The capital of the trust is to be invested 
solely in common or ordinary corporate shares. 



Price W^aterhouse &. Co. independence mao. west 

Philadelphia I9106 

October 22, 1971 

To the Board of Managers 

The Corporation of Haverford College 

In our opinion, the accompanying statement of cash transactions and book 
value of the William Maul Measey Trust presents fairly, on a basis consistent with 
that of the preceding year, the income and principal transactions of the Trust for 
the year ended June 30, 1971 and cash balances and book value at that date in 
accordance with the provisions of the Trust agreement. Our examination of this 
statement was made in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards and 
accordingly included such tests of the accounting records and such other auditing 
procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances including confirmation 
of cash and securities by correspondence with the depositary. 



^\^^'^v^=6dL^.z^, 



33 



WILLIAtl MAUL MEASEY TRUST 



Statement of Cash Transactions and Book Value 



For the Year Ended June 30, 1971 



Book value of Trust at July 1, 1970 $2,187,373.48 

Realized capital gains 146,192.93 

Book value of Trust at June 30, 1971 

including principal cash $2,333 ,566 .41 

Market value of Trust at June 30, 1971 $3.790.060.00 

Cash Statement of Receipts and Expenditures 

Principal 

Cash balance July 1, 1970 $ 8,871.78 

Investments realized 249 ,971 . 76 

$ 258,843.54 

Investments made $ 218,111.57 

Cash balance June 30, 1971 40,731.97 

$ 258,843.54 

Income 

Cash balance July 1, 1970 representing 

prior year income and reserve $ 141,027.33 

Disbursements in year 

To Haverford College for administration 

of Trust $ 13,129.84 

To Haverford College for aid to 67 students 65,649.18 

To secondary schools for aid to 63 students 49 ,600. 00 



Current year income 

Income from investments July 1, 1970 to 

June 30, 1971 136,059.32 

Interest earned on income invested 8,829. 95 



128,379.02 
12,648.31 



144,889.27 



Cash balance June 30, 1971 $ 157,537.58 

In order that the income available from the Trust for aid to students may be known 
at the beginning of each fiscal year, such income is accumulated and not awarded 
nor disbursed until the following year. 



34 



Haver ford 
College 



HAVERFORD, PA. 19041 



I 



i 



i 



i 



SUPPLEMENT 
^TO THE 



^.^1^"%*c 




Haverford College 
Publication 



Haverford College Publication, Vol. 69, No. 4, August, 1971. 
Issued six times a year by Haverford College, Haverford, Pa. 19041 : 
f January, February, May, August, September and December. Entered as 
second-class matter and postage paid at Haverford, Pa. 



Haverford College 



CALENDAR 1971-72 



Freshmen arrive (Customs Week) Fri. 

Other new students and Returning students arrive Tue. 

All student academic course registrations to be 

completed by 5:00 p.m. Wed. 

Upperclassmen register for Physical Education courses . .Tue. 7 and Wed. 

Opening Collection 7:30 p.m. Wed. 

First semester classes begin 8:30 a.m. Thu. 

First faculty meeting 4:15 p.m. Thu. 

Last day for changing courses Thu. 



9 
9 

23 



Last day for dropping a course without penalty Mon. 1 4 

Last day to request no numerical grade option (juniors & seniors) . . Mori. 14 

Winter Term Physical Education courses end Fri. 25 

Registration for Spring Term Physical Education 
Courses Mon. 28 thru Thu. March 2 

AppUcations for Cope and Murray Graduate Fellowships 

due in the President's Office 5:00 p.m. Wed. 1 

Spring Vacation Begins 4:00 p.m. Fri. 10 and ends 8:30 a.m. Mon. 20 



Last day for dropping a course without penalty Thu. 7 O 

Last day to request no numerical grade option (juniors & seniors) . . Thu. 7 C 
Fall Vacation Begins 4:00 p.m. Fri. 22 and end 8:30 a.m. Wed. 27 T. 



Fall term Physical Education courses end Fri. 5 

Registration for Winter Term Physical Education 

courses Mon. 8 through Thu. 1 1 

Swarthmore Day (no classes) Sat. 20 

Thanksgiving Vacation 

Begins 12:30 p.m. Wed. 24 and ends 8:30 a.m. Mon. 29 

Registration for Spring Semester Mon. 29 through Fri. 3 

Midyear examination schedules due in Recorder's 

Office Mon. 29 through Fri. 3 

Last day of classes Tue. 14 ^ 

Review period Wed. 15 through Thu. 16 E 

All papers (except those in lieu of examinations) due by . 4:00 p.m. Thu. 16 C. 
Papers in Heu of examinations (and laboratory notebooks) 

due as scheduled by instructor, but not later than .... 4:00 p.m. Mon. 20 
MIDYEAR EXAMINATIONS Fri. 17 through Wed. 22 

Grades due in Recorder's Office Fri. 7 j 

Second semester classes begin 8:30 a.m. Mon. 17 A 

Last day for changing courses Mon. 31 N. 



N 
O 
V. 



F 

E 
B. 

"m" 

A 
R. 



Sophomore major registration cards due in 

Dean Potter's Office 4:00 p.m. Fri. 7 

Registration for Fall (1972) Semester academic courses .Mon. 10 thru Fri. 14 

Applications for scholarships due in Admissions Office Fri. 14 A 

Prize competition manuscripts due in Recorder's Office . . . 4:00 p.m. Fri. 21 P 
Final Examinations schedules due in Recorder's Office . . Mon. 1 7 thru Fri. 21 R, 

Spring Term Physical Education courses end Fri. 28 

Last day of classes Fri. 28 

Review period Sat. 29 thru Tue. 2 May 

All papers (except those in lieu of examinations) due by . . Noon-12:00 Tue. 2 

Senior Comprehensive examinations Tue. 2 thru Thu. 4 

Final examinations for Seniors Wed. 3 thru 12:00 noon Tue. 9 

Final examinations for all other students . . Wed. 3 thru 12:00 noon Fri. 12 
Papers in lieu of examination (and laboratory notebooks) 
due as scheduled by instructor, but not later than . . . . 4:00 p.m. Tue. 9 

Oral examinations for College Honors Mon. 8, Tue. 9 and Wed. 10 

Final faculty meeting 9:00 a.m. Thu. 1 1 

COMMENCEMENT Tue. 16 



M 
A 
Y 



Parent's Day 
October 16, 1971 



Homecoming Day 
Nov. 20, 1971 



Alumni Day 
May 20, 1972 



This supplement updates information in the 1970-72 Haverford College 
catalog and ^ould be used in conjunction with that catalog. There have been 
many changes at Haverford during the past year; this supplement mainly 
describes those changes that would be of most interest to new or prospective 
students. 

^ The Haverford curriculum is designed to develop in its students the 

^capacity to learn and to understand, to make sound and thoughtful 
judgments. In line with this purpose, the curriculum is continually developing 
and evolving. During the past year, several academic departments have made 
changes in their course offerings or requirements. The English department has 
revised its requirements for students majoring in English; the psychology 
department has changed its major program and has made changes in its 
courses offered. More specific information is available by writing to the 
chairman of the proper department. The engineering department is continu- 
ing its scheduled phase-out, and will no longer accept majors. 

The physical education department has also adjusted its offerings to 
match student interests and college resources. Swimming, for example, will 
not be offered in 1971-72 as a varsity sport. 

One major change of special interest to new students is the introduction 
of freshman English into the Freshman Program (see catalog pages 47-49). 
Beginning in the fall of 1971, each freshman is assigned to either a freshman 

|English section or to the freshman seminar program; for the second semester, 

Pthese assigrmients are reversed. 

The freshman English program emphasizes the development of skills in 
expository writing, since clear writing is not only convincing evidence of clear 
thinking but is a central requirement for most advanced academic work at 
Haverford. A few freshmen who demonstrate mastery of such writing skills 
may be exempted from freshman English. 

Each 12-man section of freshman English meets for two discussion 
periods weekly. In addition, the section divides into four-man tutorials, which 
meet weekly. Each student is expected to write a paper every second week. 
The reading for the course consists of literature covering several genres. 
Grading for the course will be in the form of written evaluations. 

In most cases the teacher of the student's freshman English or freshman 
seminar section will serve as the student's adviser for the first month. 
However, if the student's teacher is new to Haverford, an experienced 
averford teacher will be assigned as adviser. After the first month, the 



/ 



student is free to select a "permanent adviser" from among his experienced 
Haverford teachers. The only factor limiting his choice will be the advising 
load of the faculty member he selects. 

What was formerly called the Freshman Inquiry (see catalog p. 48) is 
now the Freshman Conference. The name was changed to emphasize the 
advisory function of the program. m 

In the spring of his freshman year, each student is required to 
participate in a Freshman Conference. The purpose of the conference is to 
advise the student through a review of his performance and future study 
plans. 

The conference consists of an oral discussion with two faculty members 
and two seniors, representing different divisions of the college. In prepara- 
tion, each participating student must prepare an essay describing his current 
intellectual position and submit a justified plan for his future course of study. 

As with most colleges, rising costs have forced Haverford to raise fees 
for 1971-72. Tuition is now $2,425 for the academic year; room and board is 
$1,450. Weekly maid service is no longer provided. In line with the increased 
fees, the refund for students who withdraw more than four weeks before the 
end of a semester, or who are absent because of illness for more than four 
weeks, has been increased to $25 per week. 



During the past year, the renovation of Barclay Hall dormitory was 
completed. In 1971-72, Barclay will house some 120 students, mostly 
freshmen. In 1971-72, some 113 women students from Bryn Mawr College 
are expected to live in portions of Guiranere, Jones, Leeds, Lloyd and Lunt 
dormitories; an equal number of Haverford students will live at Bryn Mawr. 

If you would like additional information on programs at Haverford, 
you can consult the 1970-72 Haverford catalog or write to the proper person 
as indicated in the Correspondence Directory, page 218 of the 1970-72 
catalog. For information on Academic and Faculty Affairs, write to Thomas 
J. D' Andrea, acting provost and dean of the faculty for 1971-72. 



i 



1152 



I 



FACULTY 

AND 

AD MIIMi STRATI ON 



FACULTY 

John R, Coleman president 

B.A., University of Toronto; M.A. , and Ph.D., University of Chicago; LL.D, 
Beaver College; LL.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Manuel J. Asensio ........ professor of romance languages, emeritus 

B.A. , University of Granada; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Hugh Borton ..... ... president, emeritus 

B.S., Haverford College; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., University of 
Leyden; LL.D., Temple University; LL.D., University of Pennsylvania; LL.D., 
Haverford College. 

Howard Comfort ........ professor of cu^ssics, emeritus 

B.A., Haverford College; A.M. and Ph.D., Princeton University. 

^Thomas E. Drake . professor of American history, emeritus 

A.B., Stanford University; A.M., University of Michigan; Ph.D., Yale University. 

Cu\YTON W. Holmes professor of engineering, emeritus 

B.S. in M.E. and M.E. , University of New Hampshire; M.A. , Haverford College. 

Archibald Macintosh ...... vice president and director of admissions, emeritus 

B.A., Haverford College; A.M., Colvombia University; Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania; LL.D., Haverford college. 

Cletus 0. Oakley ..... professor of mathematics, emeritus 

S.B., University of Texas; S.M. , Brown University; Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Abraham Pepinsky ..... professor of psychology, emeritus 

A.B., and AJl., University of Minnesota; Ph.D., State University of Iowa. 

Harry W. Pfund ....... professor of german, emeritus 

B.A., Haverford College; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Frank J. Quinn .■ professor of English, emeritus 

B.A. , M.A. , and B. Litt. , Oxford University. 

Roy E. Randall professor of physical education and 

director of intercollegiate athletics, emeritus 

^ Ph.B., Brown University. 

Leon H. Rittenhouse professor of engineering, emeritus 

M.E. , Stevens Institute of Technology. 



Ralph F1, Sargent, . , francis b. gummere professor of englisH/ emeritus 

A.B., Carleton College; Ph.D., Yale University, 

Edward D. Snyder professor of englisH/ emeritus 

A.B., Yale University; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Douglas Van Steere t. wistar brown professor of philosophy/ emeritus 

S.B., Michigan State College; B.A. and M.A. , Oxford University; A.M. and Ph.D., 
Harvard University; D.D., Lawrence College; L.H.D. , Oberlin College; L.H.D., 
Earlham College; S.T.D., General Theological Seminary; LL.D., Haverford Colleg^ 

Howard F1. TeaF/ Jr professor of economics, emeritus 

B.S. in Economics, M.A. and Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

PROFESSORS 

Manuel J, Asensio+++ , , , .professor of romance languages 

B.A. , University of Granada; M.A. and Ph.D. , University of Pennsylvania. 

John Ashmead, Jr professor of English 

A.B. , A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Richard' J, Bernstein professor of philosophy 

A.B., University of Chicago, B.S., Columbia University, M.A. and Ph.D., Yale 
University. 

Edwin B, Bronner , professor of history 

A.B., Whittier College; M.A. , Haverford College; Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania. 

Robert H. Butman. ....,.,■.■. director of DRAm with rank of professor 

ON JOINT appointment WITH BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 
B.A. and M.A., University of North Carolina. 

William E. Cadbury, Jr.**** director/ post-baccalaureate I 

FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM AND PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY^ 

B.S. and M.A. , Haverford College; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

John R. Gary professor of german 

B.A. , Haverford College; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 

John P. Chesick professor of chemistry 

B.S., M.S. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Bradford Cook professor of romance languages 

B.A., Williams College; Ph.D., Yale University. 

William C. Davidon professor of physics 

B.S., M.S. and Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

John W. Davison ■ professor of music 

B.A. , Haverford College; A.M., Harvard University; Ph.D., University of 
Rochester. 

Frances De Graaff professor of Russian 

ON joint appo indent with bryn mwR college 

Ph.D., University of Leyden. 



**** On leave of absence, 1971-72 
+++ On appo indent, 1971-72 



Paul J. R. Desjardins . professor of philosophy 

B.A., M.A. and Ph.D., Yale University. 

William Docherty, Jr professor of physical education and 

DIRECTOR of PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
S. B., Temple University. 

Harmon C, Dunathan ..,,.., professor of chemistry 

B.A. , Ohio Wesleyan University; M.S. and Ph.D., Yale University. 

" Irving Finger, professor of biology 

B.A. , Swarthmore College; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Harvey Glickman professor of political science 

A.B., Princeton University;A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Lduis C, Green professor of astronomy. 

and director/ strawbridge memorial observatory 

A.B. ,A.M. and Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Marcel N. Gutwirth***, professor of romance languages 

A.B. , Columbia College;A.M. and Ph.D. , Columbia University. 

A, Paul Hare professor of sociology 

B.A. , Swarthmore College ; B. S. , Iowa State University; M.A. University of Penn- 
sylvania; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

DouGUs H, Heath professor of psychology 

A.B., Amherst College; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Theodore B. Hetzel** professor of engineering 

B.S. , Haver ford College; B.S. in M.E., University of Pennsylvania; M.S. and 
Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 

f Holland Hunter. ... professor of economics 

B.S., Haverford College;A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Dale H. Husemoller professor of mathematics 

B.A. (University of Minnesota; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

John A. Lester, Jr?** professor of English 

B.S. , Haver ford College; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Ariel G. Ldewy professor of biology 

B.S. and M.S., McGill University ; Ph.D. , University of Pennsylvania. 

Colin F. I^cKay professor of chemistry 

B.S. , University of Notre Dame;M.S. and Ph.D. , University of Chicago. 

LjDUIS MaCKEY*+<- VISITING PROFESSOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

A. B., Capital University;M.A. and Ph.D., Yale University. 

Sidney I. Perloe professor of psychology 

B.A. , New York University;Ph.D. (University of Michigan. 

Frank J. QuiNfsH-H- professor of English 

B.A.,M.A. and B.Litt. , Oxford University. 

h WiLLi/w H. Reese . . . professor of music and director of glee club and orchestra 

r A. B., Amherst College; M.A. , Columbia University; Ph.D., University of Berlin. 



**^ a^ sabbatical leave, second semester, 1971-72. 
On sabbatical leave. 



APPOIN-mENT, 19/1-72 



Edgar S. Rose professor of English 

A.B. , Franklin and Marshall College; A.M. , and Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Melvin Santer. ■ . , professor of biology 

B.S., St. John's University; M.S., University of Massachusetts; Ph.D., George 
Washington University. 

Alfred W. Satterthwaite , , professor of English 

A.B. , A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Gerhard E. Spiegler*** provost and professor of religion " 

D.B., M.A., and Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

John P. Spielman, Jr professor of history 

B.A. , University of Montana; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Thomas A, Benham , associate professor of engineering 

B.S. and M.S., Haverford College. 

Thomas J. D'Andrea acting provost and associate professor of psychology 

B.A. and Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Robert K Gavin, Jr associate professor of chemistry 

B.A. , St. John's University; Ph.D., Iowa State University. 

Linda G. Gerstein***, ... associate professor of history 

B.A. and M.A. , Radcliffe College; Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Daniel J. Gillis , associate professor of classics 

B.A., Harvard College; M.A. and Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Dietrich Kessler*** associate professor of biology j 

B.A. , Swarthmore College; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. m 

L. ArYEH KdSMAN ****. .... ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

B.A. and M.A., University of California; Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Roger Lane .associate professor of history 

B.A. , Yale University; Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Richard Luman associate professor of religion 

A.B., A.M. and Ph.D., University of Iowa. 

Wyatt PIacGaffey associate professor of anthropology 

B.A. and M.A., Cambridge University; Ph.D., University of California, Los 
Angeles. 

John W. McKenna. . scull associate professor of 

ENGLISH CONSTITLTTIONAL HISTORY 
B.A. , Amherst College; M.A. , Columbia University; Ph.D., Cambridge University. 

DOUGUS G. NiLLER** ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS 

A.B. , Yale University; Ph.D., University of Rochester. 

R. Bruce Partridge associate professor of astronomy 

on the sloan foundation grant 

B.A., Princeton University; D. Phil., Oxford University. A 

Joseph Russo. . ... associate professor of classics 

B.A. , Brooklyn College; M.A. and Ph.D., Yale University. 



** On sabbatical leave, second semester, 1971-72. 



»*« 



sabbatical leave, 



****0n leave of absence, 1971-72. 



James F. SLIFKER^-H- visiting associate professor of mathematics 

B.S., Loyola College; Ph.D., University of Notre Dame. 

Charles Stegeman assxiate professor of fine arts 

Academie Royale des Beaux-Arts, Brussels. 

JosiAH D, Thompson, Jr associate professor of philosophy 

B.A.,M.A. and Ph.D., Yale University. 

I CU\UDE E. WiNTNER ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY 

' A. B. , Princeton University; M.A. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

KATRIN T. BeAN+++ . ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF GERMAN 

B.A., Rockford College; M.A. , and Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College. 

R. Christopher Cairns assistant professor of fine arts 

A.B. ,Oberlin;M.F.A. , Tulane University. 

DisKiN Clay. . . assistant professor of classics 

B.A. , Reed College; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Washington. 

Vernon Dixon. assistant professor of economics 

B.B.A., Manhattan College; M.S., Columbia University; M.A. , Princeton 
University 

ASOKA GaNGADEAN **** ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PHILDSOPHY 

B.A. , City College of New York; Ph.D., Brandeis University. 

Jerry P. Gollub assistant professor of physics 

A.B.,Oberlin College; A.M., Harvard University; Ph.D., Harvard University. 

assistant professor of economics 

A. B., Reed College; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 

G, Eric Hansen***** assistant professor of political science 

A.B., Lawrence School; A.M., M.A.L.D. and Ph.D., The Fletcher School of Law 
and Diplomacy, Tufts University. 

William F. Hohenstein assistant professor of sociology 

A.B., Maryknoll Seminary; M.A., University of Pennsylvania. 

J. Bruce Ldng assistant professor of religion 

B.A. , Baylor University; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Richard J. Lubarsky assistant professor of English 

B.A., Swarthmore College; M.A. , University of Pennsylvania. 

Elaine FIaimonh-i- assistant professor of English 

B. A., M.A. , and Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Maria flARSHALL+ assistant professor of german 

D_iplom-Psychologin, University of Munich. 

Patrick FIcCarthy assistant professor of romance languages 

A. M. , Harvard University; D. Phil., Oxford University. 

Danielle R. niHRAM+++ assistant professor of romance unguages 

I B.A., University of Sidney;. Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 



**** On leave of absence, 1971-72 

n>, ^j^^^ Qp absence, first SEMESTER 1971-72 



+ On appointment, first semester 1' 
++ On appointment, second semester 
-H-f On appointment, 1971-72 



ii?2 



Robert A, PIortimer assistant professor of political science 

AND DIRECTOR OF AFRICAN STUDIES 
B. A., Wesleyan University; M.A. and Ph.D., Columbia University. 

Joseph Neisendorfer. ........ assistant professor of mathematics 

on the sloan foundation grant 

B.S., University of Chicago; M.A. , Princeton University. 

Doris Quinn. assistant professor of English ^ 

B.A. and M.A. , Oxford University. m 

J. Kemp Randolph assistant professor of physics 

ON THE SLOAN FOUNDATION GRANT 
B.A. , Williams College; Ph.D., Harvard University. 

James C. Ransom assistant professor of English 

B. A., University of New Mexico; M.A. and Ph.D., Yale University. 

Michael K. Showe . assistant professor of biology 

B.A., Haverford College; Ph.D., University of California, San Diego. 

Sara M. Shumer assistant professor of political science 

A.B., Barnard College; M.A., University of California, Berkeley. 

Robert E. Stiefel. assistant professor of german 

A.B., Oberlin College; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Walter J. Treu. assistant professor of physics 

B.S., Brovm University; Ph.D., Stanford University. 

Sidney R. Waldman assistant professor of political science 

A.B., Oberlin College ; Ph. D. , University of North Carolina. 



i 



Andrzej Zabludowski assistant professor of philosophy 

on the sloan foundation grant 

M.A. and Ph.D., University of Warsaw. 

INSTRUCTORS 

Dorothy Borei-hh- , , , , instructor in history 

B.A. , Lycoming College; M.A., State University of New York at Binghampton. 

FrEDERICA W. BrIND instructor in ENGLISH 

A.B. and M.A. , Bryn Mawr College. 

Constant I NE 6. CAFFENTZIS^^^- instructor in philosophy 

B.A. , City College of New York. 

Rosemary Desjardins+ . . instructor in philosophy 

B.A., M.A. , University of Melbourne 

David L. Elder-h- instructor in center for non-violent conflict resolution 

B.A., and M. A., Oberlin College. 

JEFFRY GaLPER+ INSTRXTOR IN CENTER FOR NON-VIOLENT CONFLICT RESOLUTION 

B.A. , Dartmouth College; M.S., Columbia University. 

Daniel Larkin instructor in religion 

B. A., Haverford College; M.A. , University of Chicago. M 



+ On appo indent for first semester, 1971-71 
++ On appointment for^second semester, 1971-7^ 
+++ Oj appointment, 1971-72 



John FIasley-h-i- , , instructor in mathematics 

B.S., University of Notre Dame. * 

James A, SMIT^+^-H- instructor in psychology 

A.B., Harvard College; M.A. , University of Pennsylvania. 

Janet Young-h-h. instructor in economics 

B. A., McGill University. 

LECTUERS 

HaROU: B0ATRITE+++ LECTURER IN MUSIC 

D. Mus., Combs College of Music. 

Wendy Gollub-i-h- . , . , lecturer in center for non-violent conflict resolution 

A.B., Oberlin College; Ed. M. , and Ph.D., Harvard University 

ZeLBERT FIOORE-H- , . LECTURER IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

B.A., and M.A. , University of Oklahoma. 

Temple Painter++ ,.,,., lecturer in music 

B.Mus., Curtis Institute. 

William Paul-+++ visiting lecturer in humanities 

B.A., Columbia College; M.A. , Columbia University 

Paul E. Wehr , lecturer in sociology 

B.A. , University of Connecticut; M.A. , University of North Carolina; Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania. 

Tadeusz Krauze-i-h- lecturer in political science 

M.A., University of Lodz. 

SPECIAL APPQINTOfrS 

John E. Butler assistant in biology 

Thomas Davis assistant in the science division 

Francis De Pasquale. .... member of the resident chamber music group 

Cellist, Philadelphia Orchestra, De Pasquale Quartet. 

Joseph De Pasquale member of the resident chamber music group 

Diploma, Curtis Institute of Music; Violist, Philadelphia Orchestra Member, 
De Pasquale Quartet. 

Robert De Pasquale member of the resident chamber music group 

New School of Music; Violinist, Philadelphia Orchestra; Member, De Pasquale 
Quartet. 

William De Pasquale member of the resident chamber music group 

violinist, Philadelphia Orchestra; Member De Pasquale Quartet; Concert Master, 
Philadelphia Orchestra for Robin Hood Dell Summer Concerts. 

FIarthalyn Dickson student involvement coordinator, 

center for non-violent conflict resolution 

A.B., Asbury College; M.A., Cornell University. 

Sylvia Glickman pianist in residence of the resident chamber music group 

B.S. and M.Sc, Juillard School of Music; L.R.A.M., Royal Academy of Music. 



++ On appointment for second semester, 1971-72 

■H-fON APPOINTMENT, 1971-72 



Elizabeth U, Green , research assxiate in biology 

A.B., M.A. , and Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College. 

I^RY HoxiE Jones. research associate in quaker studies 

A.B., Mount Holyoke College. 

Louise G. Onorato , . laboratory instructor in biology 

B.S., Wilkes College; M.S., Temple University. 

Rudolph ToLBERT community organization assistant field coordinator, J 

center for non'-violent conflict resolution ^ 

James L. Vaughan , director of counseling services 

B.A. Earlham College; B.D., Yale Divinity School; M.S. Yale University. 

Jane Widseth , , . counselor 

B.A., University of Minnesota; M.A. , Boston University. 

APPOINTI^BirS mm SPECIAL GRAMTS 

Carolyn von Allmen research assistant in biology 

B.A., Skidmore College. 

PI^bel N. Chen , , . research assxiate in astronomy 

B.S., The National Taiwan University; M.A. and Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College. 

Linda J. Dilworth. ..■■.......■ research assistant in biology 

Russell Eisenman research associate in center for non- 
violent conflict resolution 

B.A. , Oglethorpe University; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Georgia. 



i 



Carol C. Heller .,....,. research assistant in biology 

B.A. , Wilson College. 

Eleanor K. Kdlchin research assxiate in astronomy 

B.A. , Brooklyn College. 

Philip J. Krape. research assistant in biolxy 

B.A. , University of Pennsylvania. 

Patricia Uuanchy research assistant 

B.S., University of Michigan; M.S., Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn 

Cecily D. Littleton . research associate in astronomy 

B.A. and B.Sc, Oxford University. 

Patricia I^rker research assistant in biology 

Slavica S. Matacic , research associate in biology 

B.S., M.S., and Ph.D., University of Zagreb. 

Ann flEANY . . research assistant in biology 

B.A. , New York State University College at Brockport. 
ViVIANNE T. NAChf^IAS RESEARCH ASSXIATE IN BIOLXY 

B.A., Swarthittore College; M.A. Radcliffe College; M.D. , University of 

Rochester. M 

Dean Peabody research assxiate in center for non- 
violent CONFLICT resolution 

B.A. , Swarthmore College; Ph.D., Harvard University. 



Ursula V. Santer research associate in biology 

B.S., Swarthmore College; M.S. and Ph.D., Yale University. 

Sara Shane research assistant in biology 

B.A. , Swarthmore College. 

Allen G. Shenstone research associate in astronomy 

B.A. , Swarthmore College. 

) Harriet Stone research assistant in biology 

B.A. , Antioch College. 



ADMINISTRATION 

John R. Coleman president 

B.A^, University of Toronto; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Chicago; LL.D., 
Beaver College; LL.D. , University of Pennsylvania. 

William W. Ambler director of admissions 

B.A. , Haverford College. 

William F. Balthaser . director of public relations 

B.S., Temple University. 

Elmer J. Bogart superintendent of buildings and grounds 

Temple University Technical Institute. 

William E. CadburY/ Jr director of post-baccalaureate fellowship program 

B.S. and M.A. , Haverford College; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Stephen G. Gary vice president for development 

B.A. , Haverford College; M.A., Col\ambia University. 

George N. Couch public reutions associate 

B.A., Haverford College. 

Delores R. Davis recorder 

Thomas J. D 'Andrea acting provost and dean of the faculty 

B.A. and Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Janet Henry. ... administrative aide 

Gregory Kannerstein assistant to the president 

B.A. , Haverford College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania. 

James W. Lyons dean of students 

B.A. , Allegheny College; M.S. and Ed.D., Indiana University. 

Wayund Melton assistant dean of students 

B.S., Missouri Valley College. 

Zelbert L. Moore assistant to the president 

B.A. and M.A. , University of Oklahoma. 

Charles Perry associate director of development 

B.A. , Haver ford College. 

David Potter associate dean of the college 

B.A., Haverford College; Ed.M., Temple University. 

WiLLiw^ A. Shafer, Jr assistant director of admissions 

B. A., Haverford College. 



William E. ShepparD/II director of alumni affairs 

B.S., Haverford College. 

Charles W, Smith vice president for business affairs 

F.C.A., Institute of Chartered Accountants'; A.C.I.S., Chartered Institute of 
Secretaries; CPA. 

Gerhard E. Spiegler***, . . provost and dean of the faculty 

D.B., M.A., and Ph.D., University of Chicago. ^ 

Dana W, Swan, II director of athletics " 

B.A., Swarthmore College. 

Stephen P. Theophilos, ■ , , , , assistant business manager 

B.A., and B.D., Hellenic College; M.S., Boston University. 

Paul E. Wehr director of the center for research on 

non-violent conflict resolution 

B.A. , University of Connecticut;M.A. , University of North Carolina; Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania. 

M, Jane Williams. . ■ assistant director of development 

B.A. , University of Pennsylvania; M.A. , Temple University. 

John A. Williams, .,.,.. , , .assistant director of admissions 

B.A., Haverford College. 

feiCAL STAF 

William W. Lander physician 

B.S., Ursinus College; M.D. , University of Pennsylvania. 

Peter G. Bennett. , psychiatrist 

B.A. , Haverford College; M.D., University of Pennsylvania. M 

FIargaret L. Gledhill head nurse 

R.N. 

LIBRARY STAF 

Edwin B. Bronner, ■ . , . librarian; curator of the quaker collection 

B.A. , Whittier College; M.A. , Haverford College; Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania . 

Barbara L. Curtis cataloger, quaker collection 

B.A., Bryn Mawr College; M.A.T., Radcliffe College; M.S.{L.S.), Drexel 
University. 

David A. Eraser associate librarian, administration 

B.A., Hamilton College; M.A. and M.S. CL.S.), Syracuse University. 

Else Goldberger acquisitions librarian 

Ph.D., University of Vienna. 

PI, Constance Hyslop ........ circulation and government documents librarian 

B.A. , Mount Holyoke College; M.A. , University of Pennsylvania; M.S. (L.S.), 
Drexel University . 

Bjorg FIiehle reference librarian I 

University of Oslo; Graduate, Norwegian State Library School; B.S. O^.S.I, ^ 
Drexel University. 



***0n sabbatical leave 1971-72 



RhONA OvEDOFF. CATALOG LIBRARIAN 

B.A. and Dip. Lib., University of the Witwatersrand. 

Esther R. Ralph assistant librarian, reader services 

B.S., West Chester State College; B.S. (L.S.), Drexel University. 

Ruth H. Reese associate librarian, technical services 

B.A., Acadia University; B.S. (L.S.), Simmons College. 

Sylvia Schnaars serials librarian 

B.A. , Ohio Wesleyan University; M.S. (L.S.), Villanova University. 

Herbert C. Standing catalog librarian 

B.A. , William Penn College; M.A., Haverford College; B.D., Drake University; 
M.S. (L.S.), Drexel University. 

Shirley Stowe sxial sciences bibliographer 

B.A., Radcliffe College; M.S. CL.S.), Drexel University. 

THE JOIMT COMPUTING CENTER OF BRYN WWR, 
HAVERFORD, SWARTTORE 

Charles J. Springer. acting director 

B.S., Union College. 

David S, Bailey. systems analyst 

B.S., University of California, Los Angeles; M.A., University of Southern 
California; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley. 

Hazel C. Pugh. . operator 



ACADB1IC COUNCIL 

i 



The Academic Council consists of the President as chairman; the Provost; 
the Associate Dean as executive secretary; three elected divisional repre- 
sentatives of the faculty, one to be elected yearly; and the two faculty rep- 
resentatives to the Board. The Academic Council: 1) appoints the standing 
faculty committees, 2) makes recommendations to the President on faculty 
appointments, reappointments, promotions, and tenure in accordance with ac- 
cepted procedures, and 3) may consider matters having college-wide academic 
implications which are referred to it by the President and/or by members of 
the Council. The elected members of the Academic Council for the academic 
year beginning September 1, 1971 are Mr. Waldman (Social Sciences), Mr. Santer 
(Natural Sciences), and Mr. Bernstein (Humanities). 



STANDING COmiTTES OF THE FACULTY 



(The President and Provost are ex-officio members of all committees) 

Educational Policy : COLIN MACKAY , Chairman 

DISKIN CLAY, IRVING FINGER, ROGER LANE, DAVID POTTER 
Subcommittees : 

Educational Facilities : 

Computer-Library : JOHN CHESICK, Chairman 

JOHN ASHMEAD, EDWIN BRONNER, LOUIS GREEN 

Inter-College Acadsmic Cooperation : LOUIS GREEN, Chairman 

FRANK QUINN, JOSEPH RUSSO 

Distinguished Visitors : RICHARD LUMAN, Chairman 

WYATT MACGAFFEY, MICHAEL SHOWE 

Student Standings and Programs : PATRICK MCCARTHY, Chairman 
WALTER TRELA, SARA SHUMER, DAVID POTTER 
Subcommittee : 

College Honors , Fellowships and Prizes : EDGAR ROSE , Chairman 
PAUL DESJARDINS, DOUGLAS HEATH 

Administrative Advisory: SIDNEY PERLOE, Chairman 

HARMON DUNATHAN, DANIEL GILLIS , ALFRED SATTERTHWAITE, JOSIAH THOMPSON 
Subcommittee : 

Faculty Compensation, Study and Research : HOLLAND HUNTER, Chairman 
WILLIAM DAVIDON, BRUCE LONG 



1161 



September, 1971 



TO: Students, Faculty and Staff 
FROM: Public Relations office 



Attached are the photo portions of the class of 1975 
and Faculty/Staff directories for the 1971-72 Haverford 
Handbook. These pages were prepared during the suirimer 
months, using in many cases photos supplied by the subjects 
themselves. Where a suitable photo was not available, a 
blank appears. 

These pages have been printed and three-hole punched 
to fit your loose-leaf Handbook binder. Discard this 
cover page, carefully remove the staple and bind the 
directory pages into the proper section of your Handbook. 

The address and phone listing portions of the Student 
and Faculty/Staff directories will be issued in October. 
The Library Guide, Students' Guide and Catalog Supplement 
will be distributed separately. 



1156 



I 



i 



BOARD OF MANAGERS 1971-1972 



GIFFORDP. FOLEY 




JOHN F. GUMMERE GAYLORD P. HARNWELL ARTHUR R. KANE, JR. 



Kk^ 




NOT 
AVAILABLE 




DR. JAMES A. KATOWITZ STEPHEN L KLINEBERG BERNARD V. LENTZ BENJAMIN S. LOEWENSTEIN 



BOARD OF MANAGERS 1971-1972 




MAURICE A. WEBSTER, JR 



JOHN C. WHITEHEAD 



FACULTY-STAFF 71-72 



► 





NOT 
AVAILABLE 




W.W. AMBLER M. ASENSIO J. ASHMEAD W. F. BALTHASER K. BEAN 




T. A. BENHAM P.G.BENNETT R.BERNSTEIN D. V. BOREI E. BOGART 



> 




NOT 
AVAILABLE 




NOT 
AVAILABLE 



F.W. BRIND E. BRONNER R. H. BUTMAN W. E. CADBURY C. CAFFENTZIS 




C. CAIRNS 



J. GARY 



S. GARY J. P. CHESIGK D.CLAY 




J. R. COLEMAN B. COOK 





G. COUCH 




NOT 
AVAILABLE 




J.H.DAVISON F.DE GRAFF P. DESJARDINS R. DESJARDINS V.J.DIXON 



FACULTY-STAFF 71-72 





W. DOCHERTY H. DUNATHAN D.L.ELDER L FINGER 




NOT 
AVAILABLE 




A. GANGADEAN L. GERSTEIN D. J.GILLIS M. GLEDHILL H. GLICKMAN 




E. GOLDBERGER J. GOLLUB 



L. GREEN 



S. GUBINS 



M. GUTWIRTH 




G. E. HANSEN A. P. HARE 



D. H. HEATH 



T. B. HETZEL W. F. HOHENSTEIN 




D. KESSLER L A. KOSMAN T.KRAUZE W.W.LANDER D. LARKIN 



FACULTY-STAFF 71-72 




J.W.LYONS W. MACGAFFEY C. MAC KAY 



I 




L. H. MACKEY 



I 



NOT 
AVAILABLE 



NOT 
AVAILABLE 



NOT 
AVAILABLE 



E.MAIMON 



M. MARSHALL 



NOT 
AVAILABLE 



P. MCCARTHY J.W. MCKENNA 




J. MASLEY W. C. MELTON 



NOT 
AVAILABLE 




J. K. RANDOLPH J. C. RANSOM 



FACULTY-STAFF 71-72 




NOT 


f ^ ^ 


AVAILABLE 


•i. -'■'■ , 




^ 



R.REESE W.REESE E.S.ROSE J. RUSSO A. SATTERTHWAITE 




% 







S. SCHNAARS W. A. SHAFER W. SHEPPARD M. K. SHOWE S. SHUMER 



NOT 
AVAILABLE 




NOT 
AVAILABLE 





^^ 



J.SLIFKER C.W.SMITH J.SMITH G. SPIEGLER J.SPIELMAN 



NOT 
AVAILABLE 




C. SPRINGER C. STEGEMAN R.E. STIEFEL S. STOWE 



D. SWAN 




NOT 
AVAILABLE 



P. E. WEHR J.A.WILLIAMS M.J.WILLIAMS C. WINTNER J.YOUNG 



I 



FACULTY-STAFF 71-72 




A. ZABLUDOWSKI A. ZANIN 



I 



i 



i 



i 



CLASS OF 1975 





NOT 
AVAILABLE 



R. B. ADAMS 



NOT 
AVAILABLE 



S. J.ANDERSON B. P. BAKKE T. W. BARLOW 0. E. BARNES, JR 






W. A. BEDROSSIAN R.W.BIRCH J.W. BLENKO 




A.J. BORSON P. E. BOSTED J. P. BRENNAN 




A. BROMBERG S. L. BRONSTEIN F. C. BROSIUS 







F. J.BUZOLITS G.J. CACCHIONE B.H.CAMPBELL G. B. CARGILL J. S. CARP 



CLASS OF 1975 



T. CARROLL 



7^ 




G.L CORNELL J. L CRITE E. T. CROOKS G.R.CUNNINGHAM D. Y. CURRAN 




C. A. DALE R. H. DAVISON R. DE JESUS A. F. DOAN L, M. DOLLET 




,J^ 









1 i £. 

R.M.DOUGLAS M.N.DUNCAN C.N.EDMONDS C.M.EDWARDS ^ D. D. ENGEL 




C.EVANS S.C.EVANS E. D. FEiGELSON P. L. FINE J. D. FLOWER, JR. 




'■AMBbM HmT^' iktek. 




J. B. FLOYD G. B. FOOTE C. S. FORMAL J. M. FOX 



L M. FREDANE 



CLASS OF 1975 



I 




m p. C.GREIF L. R. GROBMAN D. P. HACKETT D. A. HANSELL J. W. HARRER 





L. A. HAUSNER 



S. G. HEALD 



> 





S.N.HERMAN P.J.HOCHMAN D. M. HUDIAK 




J. K. HUIBREGTSE P. T. INGMUNDSON D.A. IRACKI T. E. ISENBERG R.S. JANETT 




'^•JENKINS E.L. JURIST D. A. KAHN H. E. KAVROS D. YOUNG SOON KIM 



CLASS OF 1975 



NOT 
AVAILABLE 





f^ I 



A.J. KROL 




J.M. KROM P. L. KUHL S.N.KURTZ A. C. LAPEYRE 



i 
A. C. LARNER 




T.H. LEIGH H.M. LEVIT M. J. LIGHTEN 



J.P. MCGLAFFERTY 



J.M. MGGREIGHT 



i 




^^ 




\ fjKi 






J. L. MALIN M. MANDELKERN T. A. MANZONE 



S. MASON, JR. L. S. MILLER 




W.E, MURPHY J. NAGEL R. D. NAGELE N. NANDHABIWAT C. E. NEELLEY 



CLASS OF 1975 





^fk iM 



H.W. NEIGHBORS J.E. NESTLER B. P. NEWBURGER B. NEWHWN 






T. J. PELL 




T.J.PENDLETON C.M.PERKINS J.P. QUINLAN D.U.RABIN J. A. RODRIGUEZ 




G. P. ROMANSKY A. ROOT L. C. RUFFIN, JR. M. J. RUSS M. M. RUTTER 




J. L SAMPLE J.E. SARFATY C. L. SCHOEN R. SCHOUTEN C. F. SEIGLER 




E. D.SHAVIN - R. K. SHEUNEIII M. SHENKER S. A. SHERK S. B. SHUBERT 



CLASS OF 1975 




NOT 
AVAILABLE 




i 



iiil 





k 



\ z: 










D, B. SITMAN D. M. W. SKEELS 



NOT 
AVAILABLE 




A.J.SMITH J.R. SOLENDER J. E. SPAULDING M. D. SPINRAD A. R. STEIN 







W. W. SUDERLEY J. R. SUSSMAN D. W. THOMFORDE G. M. TOBIN A.S.TOBY 





T. TSUJIMGTO S, TUHRIM E. N. TURKHEIMER P. N. UHLIG S. C. VAUGHN, JR. 




K. WEAVER J.C. WEISBERG S.M.WERNER D. M. WESSEL M.B.WILLIAMS 









R.E.WILLIS R.J.WILLIS P.W.WOOD J.W.WRIGHT 




W. B.YOUNG 



CLASS OF 1975 




Y.ZEGEYE K.J. ZIMMER B. L ZUBROW 



FORMER SPECIAL STUDENTS, NOW FULL-TIME 



NOT 
AVAILABLE 



S. B. COOK A. C. CRUZ 








I 



J.S.DUNN 



. H.FINKLE R. GENTILE 



NOT 
AVAILABLE 



NOT 
AVAILABLE 



NOT 
AVAILABLE 



J. E. GOLIN C. GOUTMAN S. E. O'GRADY E. J. SCHORK, JR. M. A. SPRINGER 




H.D. UDERMAN R.I.WHITE E.W.WRIGHT 

TRANSFERS ARRIVING 
AT H AVERFORD 1971-72 



NOT 
AVAILABLE 




NOT 
AVAILABLE 



J.VANOUS P.M.WASHINGTON 



i 



I 



a 



^ 



LIBRARY 



GUIDE 



I 




HAVERFORD COLLEGE 



1971 




AVERFORD COLLEGE LIBRARY The library at Hoverford College 
consist's of two main parts: the 'Thomas Wistar Brown Library, 
portions of which date from 1864; and the James P. Magi 1 1 Library, 
completed in 1968. When the Magi 1 1 Ubrary was built, extensive 
alterations and improvements also were made to the older structure. 
The Library has some 73,000 sq. ft. of floor space. Its shelves 
will hold a half-million volumes, and it can seat 500 persons. Air and humidity 
are controlled throughout the building. Rare books and manuscripts are guarded 
in a fireproof vault protected by a carbon -dioxide fire -extinguishing system. There 
are 260 carrels. Thirty-one are enclosed and reserved for faculty use, and 24 are 
reserved for students who wish to use typewriters. The original north wing of the 
Library building was renovated in 1952 and named the Philips Wing in honor of 
one of the college's principal benefactors, William Pyle Philips, a member of the 
Class of 1902. 

WHO MAY USE THE LIBRARY This is a private library provided for the use of 

the faculty, students, and other members of the 
Hoverford academic community. It is not open to the general public. Exceptions 
to this rule are made for several categories of persons. Students and faculty of 
Bryn Mawr College and of Swarthmore College are extended use of the library upon 
presentation of proper identification. Hoverford College alumni, members of the 
Library Associates, and faculty members of neighboring colleges and universities 
may also use the library, and will be provided library cards. Other persons wish- 
ing to use the library, including checking out books, will be asked to pay an 
annual fee of fifteen dollars. Regulations are available at the Circulation Desk, 
This fee will not be collected from persons wishing to check references in the 
library. Such visitors will be asked to sign a visitor's book and are requested 
to come during the day, in order to leave the library free for Hoverford and Bryn 
Mawr students in the evening, after 7:30 p.m. 

LIBRARY HOURS MAIN LIBRARY: 8:30 a.m. to 12 midnight, Monday - Friday; 
Saturday/ 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday, I p.m. to 12 mid- 
night. The Quaker Collection: 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., and 1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m., 
Monday - Friday. DEPARTMENTAL LIBRARIES: Stokes : Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. 
to 6 p.m., 7 p.m. to 12 midnight; Saturday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday, I p.m. 
to 6 p.m., 7 p.m. to 12 midnight. Sharp I ess (Biology): Monday -Saturday, 
8 a.m. to II p.m.; Sunday, 2 p.m. to II p.m. Hi lies (Engineering): Monday - 
Friday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.; 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.; Saturday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.; 
7 p.m. to 10 p.m.; Sunday, closed. Drinker (Music): Hours to be posted at 
Drinker and in Main Library. Observatory : Open by appointment. 

CARD CATALOG To ascertain whether a book is owned by the Library, look 
in the Cord Catalog under the author's name, the title of 
the book, or the name of the editor or translator of the book. When works on a 
certain subject, rather than a specific book, are wanted, these can be found by 
looking in the catalog under the appropriate subject heading, e.g., a German - 
English dictionary could be found under the heading "GERMAN LANGUAGE — 
DICTIONARIES ~ ENGLISH." 

In order to find the book in the stacks after deciding, by consulting the 
catalog, which book or books will be useful, it is necessary to note (in writing) 



fhe call number (including any caption above fhe number), which will be found 
in the upper left hand comer of the catalog card. The call number (example: 
HC 102. 5. A2 H7) tells where in the Library the book is shelved. (See alpha- 
betical location guide below.) If the book wanted is not found in its place on 
the stack shelves, the call number should be given to the attendant at the Circu- 
lation Desk, who will be able to give its location. 

Green slips in the Card Catalog indicate new books. If a full call number 
is penciled on the slip, the book is on the shelves. If a single number (between 
I and 365) is on the slip, ask the circulation attendant for the book. 

Special locations for books (e.g., Gummere-Morley Room, Philips Wing, 
Music Library, Biology or some other laboratory) are indicated on the catalog 
cards by captions printed over the call numbers. In these cases, the book will be 
found not in the same area of the main library as other books with the same 
classification but in the particular room of the Library or in the other building 
mentioned. An asterisk (*) beside a call number indicates that the book is over- 
sized; if the book is not in its normal place on the shelf, it is shelved on the 
bottom shelf in the same section of the stack, in some instances oversized books 
are located elsewhere. Consult the circulation attendant. 

The Haverford Card Catalog includes author cards for all books added to the 
Bryn Mawr College Library since 1947. It also contains full entry (author, sub- 
ject, title) cards for Russian holdings at Bryn Mawr and Swarthmore. Books are 
not to be put back on the shelf by the reader. They should be left on the near- 
est table. 



ALPHABETICAL LOCATION GUIDE TO BOOKS BY CALL NUMBER 

Classes 

A CniNI'RAL WORKS 

(General cncy'clopcdias, reference books, periodicals, etc.) 

Basement 
B PHILOSOPHY— RELIGION 

B-BJ Philosophy, including BF, Psychology 

BL-BX Religion Basement-ist Tier 

BX 7600-7799 Quakerism 2nd Tier 

C AUXILIARY SCIENCES OF HISTORY 

CB History of civilization (General) 

CC Archaeology 

CD Archives 

CJ Numismatics 

CN, & 687-763 (old classif.) Epigraphy 

CR Heraldry 

CS Genealogy 

CT Biography (General) 1st Tier 

D HISTORY: GENERAL AND OLD WORLD 

(Including geography of individual countries) 
D World history, including World Wars 1st Tier 



DA 


Great Britain 


DB 


Austria 


DC 


France 


DD, etc. 


Other individual countries 



\sf Tier 

E-F HISTORY OF AMERICA 

(Including geography of individual countries) 
E 1-143 America (General) 

E 151-857 United States (General) 

F 1-957 United States: States and local 

F 1001-1140 Canada 
F 1201-3799 Spanish America Ist Tier 

G GEOGRAPHY, ANTHROPOLOGY, FOLKLORE, ETC. 

G Geography (General) 

GB Physical geography 

GC Oceanography 

GN Anthropology 

GR Folklore 

GV Recreation 1st Tier 

H SOCIAL SCIENCES 

HA Statistics 3rd Tier 

HB-HJ Economics 3rd-4fh Tiers 

HM-HX Sociology 4th Tier 

J POLITICAL SCIENCE 

JA-JC Political science 

JF-JQ Constitutional history and public 

administration 

JS Local government 

JV Colonies, Emigration, etc. 

JX International law 4th Tier 

K & 276-299 (old classif.) LAW ' 4th Tier 

4th Tier 

M 



N 



MUSIC 




M 


Scores 


ML 


Literature of music 


MT 


Musical instruction 


FINE ARTS 




NA 


Architecture 


NB 


Sculpture 


NC 


Graphic arts 


ND 


Painting 


NK 


Decorative arts 



4th Tier 



1st Tier 
*Afev^ M books are kept in the main library; most are in Drinker Hall. 



R 



LANGUAGE 
P 

PA 
PA 8000 

PC 

PD-PF 

PG 

PJ-PL 

PN 

PQ 

PR 

PS 

PT 

Fiction 

SCIENCE 
QA 
QB 
QC 
QD 
QE 
QH 
QK 
QL 
QM 
QP 
QR 

MEDICINE 



AND LITERATURE 

Philology and ling^uistics 

Classical languages and literatures 
-8595 & 772-773 (ol'd classif.) 

Medieval & Modern Latin literature 

Romance languages 

Germanic languages, including PE, English 

Slavic languages and literatures 

Oriental languages and literatures 

General and comparative literature 

Romance literatures 4th Tier 

English literature 2nd Tier (South Wing) 

American literature 3rd Ti er 

Germanic literatures 5th Tier 

Fiction in English. Juvenile literjiture 3rd Ti er 

Mathematics 

Astronomy 

Physics 

Chemistry 

Geology 

Natural history 

Botany 

Zoology 

Human anatomy 

Physiology 

Bacteriology 



5th Tier 



5th Tier 



AGRICULTURE 



5th Tier 



TECHNOLOGY 

TA General engineering, including general civil 

engineering 

TC Hydraulic engineering 

TD Sanitary and municipal engineering 

TE Highway engineering 

TF Railroad engineering 

TG Bridge engineering 

TH Building construction 

TJ Mechanical engineering 5th Tier 



**Location of Q (Science) books is determined by the caption above 
the coll number. Q books kept in the main library have "Main 
Library" above the call number on the catalog card. These books 
are on the 5th tier. Biology laboratory Q books are in Sharpless; 
Observatory Q books are in the Observatory; Engineering Q books 
are in Hilles; all other Q books are in Stokes Library. 



TK 


Electrical engineering. Nuclear engineering 


TL 


Motor vehicles. Aeronautics. Astronautics 


TN 


Mining engineering. Mineral industries. 




Metallurgy 


TP 


Chemical technology 


TR 


Photography 


TS 


Manufactures 


TT 


Handicrafts. Arts and crafts 


TX 


Home economics 5th 



U MILITARY SCIENCE 



V NAVAL SCIENCE 



Tier 



5th Tier 



5th Tier 



Z BIBLIOGRAPHY AND LIBRARY SCIENCE 5th Tier 

Government and International Documents Basement 

Reference 2ncl Tier 

Current periodicals and newspapers 2nd Tier 

Ruskin Collection 2nd Tier 

FLOOR PLANS The Magi II Library has six levels; basement, Ist tier, 2nd tier 
(where circulation desk, catalog, periodicals room, reference 
section, and main reading room are), 3rd tier, 4th tier and (on older or north side 
of the building only) 5th tier. Maps of the various areas are installed near the 
stairways on each tier. These maps show the location of books and special rooms, 
if at any time you need information about these matters, do not hesitate to inquire 
at the circulation desk. Staff members will be glad to help you. 



FECIAL ROOMS AND WORK AREAS Gummere- 
Morley Room (Ist tier), a browsing room commemorat- 
ing Professors F. B. Gummere and Frank Morley, Sr. 
(Smoking permitted) 

Microforms Room (2nd tier), equipped with micro- 
films, microfiche, microcards, and readers. 

Rufus M. Jones Study (2nd tier), a replica of Rufus 
Jones' study, with some of his books and furniture. 

The Quaker Collection (2nd tier) is housed in a suite of rooms. The new Borton 
Wing includes the vault below the main floor and the Harvey Peace Research Room 
on the balcony. The Quaker Collection contains 25,000 volumes, the Rufus M. 
Jones Mysticism Collection, 100,000 manuscripts, a collection of microform 
materials with readers, and other material. All of the manuscripts, including the 
Charles Roberts Autograph Letters Collection, and all of the rare books of the 
Library are housed in the vault in this area. The Quaker Collection, Borton Wing, 
and Harvey Room are not undergraduate reading areas. Mrs. Barbara Curtis, 
Quaker Bibliographer, will be happy to assist you in using this collection. 




The Colli nson/Fothergi II Library (2nd tier. Philips Wing), is the name given 



to the college's collection of pre-nineteenth-century imprints. A great number 
of books in the collection are primary sources - sources more profitably used in 
the pursuit of original research than in the composition of survey papers. This 
port of the Ubrary is open only when there is an attendant on duty. 

These books, mostly eighteenth-century items, form a commemorative 
collection - honoring tv/o British Quaker scholars, associates of Benjamin Franklin 
and patrons of American libraries. The one, Peter ColHnson, was the eighteenth- 
century British botanist who gave books, advice, and energies to the budding 
libraries of Pennsylvania, among them the Friends' Library of Philadelphia (now 
in Haverford's custody); the other. Dr. John Fothergiil, one of Britain's great 
physicians in the eighteenth century, patronized several literary projects, aided 
the fledgling medical schools in the colonies, authored several volumes and, like 
Collinson, was active in the Royal Society. 

The Christopher Morley Alcove (2nd tier), at the east end of the building, 
serves as a browsing area and contains exhibits and collections of Christopher 
Morley' s writings. 

The Sharpless Gallery (2nd tier), named in honor of Isaac Sharpless, presi- 
dent of HaveriFord College, 1887-1917, and furnished by the Class of 1917, is a 
public gallery where some of the college's paintings are hung and exhibits are 
displayed. 

The Hires Room (1st tier), named for Harrison Hires, Class of 1910, and 
Mrs. Hires, is an audio room where discs and tapes can be heard. This room is 
to be used primarily for listening to recordings of the spoken word. 

The Strawbridge Seminar Room (1st tier), is used for seminars and committee 
meetings. (Smoking permitted) 

The C. C. Morris Cricket Library and Collection (2nd tier, off the Philips 
Wing), named in honor of an internationally famous cricketer and a member of 
the Class of 1904, houses material illustrating the history of American cricket 
with special emphasis on the sport at Haverford College and in the Philadelphia 
area. This room is not open for general undergraduate use. 

The Crawford Mezzanine (2nd tier), in the South Wing provides writing and 
study tables for forty-four students. It is named for Alfred R. Crawford, Class of 
1931, vice-president of Haverford College, 1964-1966. 

There is a reading area at the end of the South Wing (2nd tier), the gift 
of the Class of 1942, with additional study tables and easy chairs; also a lounge 
area on the 4th tier near the elevator. 



NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS The Periodicals Reading Room is located on 

the main (second) floor adjacent to the Sharp- 
less gallery. Mrs. Sylvia Schnaars, Periodical and Government Documents Librarian, 
may be consulted in her office at the end of the room. Current issues of periodicals 
may not be removed from this area by anyone except for Xeroxing, and bound 
periodicals may be charged out only by members of the Haverford faculty. News- 
papers, including a number of foreign language editions, are also to be found in 



|-his room. 

The New York Times is available on microfilm bock to 1851, the current 
microfilms being received about tv/o weeks later than the paper. Microfilms and 
readers are in the Microforms room (2nd tier) and the New York Times index is 
shelved nearby in the Reference area. The Library also has films of the Philadelphia 
Public Ledger from 1836 through 1929. Back numbers of other Philadelphia news- 
papers are available on film at the Free Library of Philadelphia. 

Quaker periodicals are housed in the Quaker Collection. 

A metal visible file of titles and call numbers of ail periodicals received 
currently will be found near the public card catalog and a copy of this list is in 
the Periodicals Reading Room. The Kardex File in the Periodicals Reading Room 
should be consulted for complete holdings of a given title which is currently 
received. For holdings and call numbers of periodicals which the Library no longer 
receives or which have been discontinued, consult the public card catalog. 

The Union List of Serials and New Serial Titles are useful in verifying 
information about periodicals and in locating those not available at Haverford. 
These are kept in the Catalog Room. 

U.S. GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS Haverford College Library Is a depository 

for selected United States government 
publications, with holdings concentrated in the following areas: Census bureau; 
HEW; Labor; The President's Office; State Department. The bulk of this material 
is housed as a separate collection in the basement, arranged by Superintendent of 
Documents Schedule, which makes items easy to find. All of this material is 
indexed in The Monthly Catalog of U.S. Government Publications, copies of which 
may be found in the Periodicals Reading Room as well as in the basement with 
the collection. A few publications are cataloged and shelved in the main library 
collection and may be found by consulting the public card catalog. 

EPARTMENTAL LIBRARIES Use of these departmental 
libraries is restricted to Haverford, Bryn Mawr, and 
Swarthmore College faculty and students. Anybody 
else wishing to borrow a book from a departmental 
library must apply to the circulation desk in the 
main library and use the book there. He should 
request the book 24 hours in advance of the time 
it is needed. 

Bound volumes of periodicals may be charged out 
of a departmental library only by a member of the 
faculty and only for use within the building where 
the departmental library is located (or for use at the secretarial office for copy- 
ing purposes). Current issues may not be charged out. 

With the exceptions noted above, rules governing the use of departmental 
libraries are the same as those applicable to the main library. 

Carrels in the Stokes Science Library and the Biology departmental library 
in Sharpless are assigned on a seniority basis to science majors. Books charged 
for use in carrels may not be taken from the library rooms. 
Smoking is not permitted in any departmental library. 

All science libraries are administered by the Stokes Hall Librarian, whose 
office is adjacent to the Stokes Library. Any questions regarding them should be 
addressed to her. 




To borrow a scienHfic publication through Interlibrary Loan, see or call the 
Stokes Hall Librarian (Extension 269). 






,^ yr^-.-r-,,^^, ^^, IRCULATION DEPARTMENT All books to be taken 

, ,'fe /^^ 'm^ci^!^i^ O"*" °^ ^^^ Ubrary building must be charged at the 

'' (f^iI'l^j^^^A^^^ o circulation desk. Use the colored cards found there. 

"^'^^^^S^'^ff^^'^^^^^.^^ The call number found at the top of the bookplate or 

^ u'^'f^^ ''^^tr^"' °" ^^^ spine of the book should be written rn the 

r \i^y '^'^i!!^j/j0' '^ upper left hand corner of the card; then the borrower' s 

^^^^^iB^J^^-^r name, status, and campus address. Finally, the name 

*r|»i^^, '^]^^Hi-^ of the author and title of the book borrowed should 

^ "^ be added. 

The loan period is one semester, but any book may be recalled after a month, if 

it Is required by someone else. Current fiction may be recalled within two weeks. 

The front-door attendant will stamp the dye-date in the front of each book charged. 

If you need assistance at the circulation desk and no one is in sight, ring 

the bell. 

A book in circulation may be reserved by giving the desk attendant the call 
number of the book and asking to have it held. The person requesting the book 
will be notified when the book has been returned. 

To return a book which has been charged out, simply place it in the slot at 
the circulation desk. When the Library is closed, the book slot at the entrance 
should be used for the return of books. 

BOOKS IN CARRELS Books kept in carrels must be charged at the circulation 

desk on green cards labelled for carrel use, carrel num- 
ber to be given instead of campus address. A long green slip with space for 
carrel number at the top should be placed in each book. Any book without this 
slip will be removed from the carrel. 

BOOKS ON RESERVE Reserve books may be borrowed for two hours only, 

unless an instructor has specified a longer period. They 
must be used in the Library building. If they are not returned on time, the 
borrower will be fined. If no one else needs the reserve book at the end of the 
two hour period, however, it may be borrowed for another hour. 

Reserve books taken out overnight are due back at 10:15 a.m., and the 
borrower will be fined if they are not returned promptly. 

CHECK OUT AT LIBRARY ENTRANCE The Library has suffered serious losses of 

books, periodicals, and bound volumes of 
periodicals in recent years, and has decided to institute a check-out system at 
the door. 

All persons leaving the library - faculty, students, and visitors - will be 
asked to present their books to the checker for charging and will be asked to 
open briefcases, bags, or other containers. 

We regret that it has become necessary to follow this new procedure. We 
feel, however, that it is the only way in which we can protect the library 
collections, keep a record of the location of all material at all times, and 
guarantee that books, periodicals, and other sources will be on the shelves when 
they are needed. 



PHOTOCOPYING A coin -operated machine has been installed in the Card 

Catalog Area, on the second tier. The cost is 10 cents a 

page. Please go to the circulation desk if the machine fails to operate properly. 

INTERLIBRARY LOAN AND USE OF OTHER LIBRARIES When there is a need 

for a book not owned 
by the Haverford College Library, apply at the circulation desk for an interlibrory 
loan form; if the work desired is one on a scientific subject, however, apply in 
the Library in Stokes. The Interlibrory Loan Librarian, Mrs. Bjorg Miehle, will 
In most cases be able to borrow the book from another library for use under the 
terms and time limit stated by the lending library. 

Haverford College students are permitted to use the Bryn Mawr and Swarth- 
more College Libraries upon the presentation of their identification cards. They 
must carry such cards with them. The University of Pennsylvania requires a special 
card which may be obtained from the Circulation Librarian. The University of 
Pennsylvania requires a new card each month. When using the library of another 
college Haverford students are expected to acquaint themselves with the regulations 
of that library and abide by them strictly. 

REFERENCE SERVICE We hope you know that all members of the Library Staff 
are willing to assist you with problems you may encounter 
in using the library. The advice of a trained bibliographer is available through the 
circulation desk, where you should make your needs known. There are three 
bibliographers on the library staff. Miss Shirley Stowe (Social Sciences), Mr. David 
Eraser (Humanities), and Mrs. Suzanne Newhall in the Stokes Library (Natural 
Sciences). These people have specialized In learning the research techniques 
peculiar to their fields and are anxious to share the short-cuts and time-savers 
that make research In libraries less tedious and more efficient. 

During periods of peak library use an additional Reference Service will be 
available - a staff member will be stationed at the card catalog to offer suggestions 
on library use, and to give direction to those of you who become entangled in 
our bibliographic network. 

To supplement our advising service, the Library has begun issuing a series 
of pamphlets describing the most useful bibliographical tools in certain disciplines. 

EW BOOKS New books are put on display daily on top 

of the book case in front of the circulation desk. You may 
place a "hold" on a new book and pick It up at the circu- 
lation desk after 2 p.m. Mondays, when new books are 
cleared for circulation. New books on science are sent 
directly to the appropriate departmental libraries each Monday after they 
have been removed from display. They may not be reserved. 

The Librarian welcomes suggestions for new books. They should be 
placed in the box provided on the new book shelf. 

CARRELS Student carrels are located on all tiers except the 5th. To reserve 
a carrel, inquire at the circulation desk. Typing carrels are on the 
1st and 4th tiers (old stacks). Lockers where typewriters may be kept are on the 
1st tier. To obtain the combination of one of these lockers, inquire also at the 
circulation desk. 

Enclosed carrels on the 1st and 4th tiers are reserved for faculty members. 

10 




TELEPHONES Two pay phones are available on the Isf Her, near the front stair door. 

LIBRARY RULES The construction of the Magi 1 1 Library and renovation of the 
older structure were made possible by the generosity of many 
Haverford graduates and friends. Users of the building are expected to treat the 
furnishings and equipment with appropriate care. We want to make this building 
and the Library services as convenient and efficient as possible. In turn we require 
that readers observe some simple rules which are necessary to assure proper mainte- 
nance, safety, and comfort. 

Smoking. Permitted only in the Strawbridge Seminar Room and the 

Gummere-Morley Room, on the 1st tier. 
Food and drink. Do not bring food or drinks into the building. 
Animals. Please do not bring animals into the building. 
Posters. Posters are allowed only in the display case at the front door and 

on the board opposite the 2nd tier elevator. 
Coats and umbrellas. These should be left in the racks andumbrella 

stands provided. 
Doors and windows must not be propped open. 
Typing. Carrels where typewriters may be used are located on the south 

side of the old stacks, 1st and 4th tiers. 
"Abeunt studio in mores": Library books are not to be marked, torn, 
defaced, or damaged in any way. Readers must observe silence in the 
Library and must cooperate in maintaining an atmosphere conducive to 
undisturbed study. They are responsible for proper care of Library tables 
and chairs, as well as books. Imitation of Machiavelli ' s custom of donning 
his best clothes before spending the evening in the company of ancient 
authors is not required, but readers are expected to observe conventional 
standards of dress and decorum at all times, and for all authors. 
Fi nes. All books must be returned by the last day of the semester. A fine 
of 25 cents a day per book is charged for books returned late to the circu- 
lation desk. 

The Library reserves the right to call in any book at any time, even be- 
fore it is due. A fine of 25 cents a day is charged for books not returned 
promptly in response to an "emergency recall." 

A special schedule of fines applying to reserve books overdue is posted 
on the library bulletin board near the Reserve desk. 

All student fines remaining unpaid at the end of the semester following 
that in which they were incurred will be doubled and charged against the 
student's account. 

The Library has an obligation to make every effort to regain books which 
have not been returned by readers. In a very real sense the library 
belongs to future generations of students as much as to current ones. May 
we gently remind you that there are even legal steps which we may take 
as a last recourse to regain books not returned to the Librory on time. 
Lost books. Lost books should be reported immediately. From the date 
on which they are reported lost, no more overdue fines wi|l accumulate. 
The borrower is responsible, however, for payment of the cost of the book 
and processing it. (If one volume of a set is lost and cannot be replaced, 
the whole set must be paid for.) 



NOTES ON ILLUSTRATIONS 

The woodcut appearing on the cover of this guide is taken from Johann Geiler 
von Kaisersberg' s Narrenschif . . . (Strassburg, 1520). It is ascribed to the young 
Albrecht Durer. The cover design is typical of those appearing on sixteenth- 
century imprints. 

The initial "H" on page 2 is a decorated uncial, circa 1475. 

The initial "S" on page 6 was designed by Hans Holbein. It was used by the 
Basel printer Valentin Curio, 1522. 

The initial "D" on page Sis taken from an alphabet designed in 1710 by the South 
German writing master George Heinrich Pari ti us. 

The initial "C" on page 9 is taken from an alphabet designed by the New Yorker 
Daniel T. Ames in 1879. 

The initial "N" on page 10 is taken from a wood engraving by Eric Gill which 
appeared in The Four Gospels (1931). 

*Each of the initials described here has been reduced from its original size. 



12 



Haverford College 

STUDENTS' GUIDE 

1971-72 



Published by the Dean of Students for 
the students of Haverford College, Haverford, Pa. 



RESIDENCE HALL S 

Opening and Closing . Rooms may be occupied from noon on Tuesday, 
September 7, until noon on the day after Commencement, except for 
vacation periods as noted below. 

Vacation Residence . Students may occupy their own dormitory rooms 
without additional cost during fall and Thanksgiving vacations. No 
students may remain on campus between the first and second semesters. 
Arrangements for spring vacation will be announced during the year. 

Fees — Room and Boar d. The room and board fee of $1450 is due in two 
equal installments. The first semester bill must be paid in full by 
August 25, unless other arrangements have been explicitly made with 
the Business Office. The second semester bill is due on January 7, 
1972. 

No refund of room rental is made if a student vacates his room 
during a semester. If a student vacates his room during the first 
semester, he will not be liable for a second semester room charge. 

Room Assignments . In the spring students choose rooms for the follow- 
ing year in a room draw giving priority to upperclassmen. A student 
must receive consent of the Dean of Students to transfer his room 
assignment. A student permitted to move must return the key of the 
room vacated and obtain a new key for his new room. A $2 charge is 
made for a room change. 

Furniture . Furniture and equipment provided by the College must 
remain in the dormitory room. The only exception should be that 
when a student decides that he will not want a particular item of 
furniture for the entire year, he should take the piece of furniture 
to the storage area provided in the Dining Center basement, and notify 
the Buildings and Grounds Department in writing. He is then re- 
sponsible for making sure the item of furniture is returned to its 
original location at the end of the academic year. 



Students' Guide 1971-1972 

Following year-end inspection, students will be charged for 
missing or damaged equipment and for damage to the room or suite. 

Personal rugs and furniture must comply with fire and sanitation 
regulations. Students' furniture must be portable and not attached 
to the walls. Construction of scaffolding and platforms is not 
permitted. 

Keys . Students should have keys for their rooms and should keep 
their rooms locked for security reasons. Keys are issued by the 
Buildings and Grounds Office at the beginning of the academic year. 
A $2 deposit is required at this time and is refunded when the key 
is returned. Replacement of a lost key entails a $2 charge. Failure 
to return a key within three days after Commencement will result in 
an additional $10 charge - 

Refrigerators . Refrigerators are permitted but are limited as to 
size, use, and location. An outside firm will rent refrigerators 
to Haverford students at a fee of about $36 a year. Arrangements 
for rental may be made at the time of non-academic registration. 
Specific regulations regarding use and location of refrigerators 
will be available then. Refrigerators must be emptied and cleaned 
at the end of the year. 

Antennas . The College does not allow the installation of wire 
antennas or connections between rooms or outdoors. 

Laundry Equipment . The College provides laundry equipment in the 
basements of Barclay, Gummere, and Jones. 

Telephones . Students may arrange to have private telephones 
installed in their rooms. Representatives of the Bell Telephone 
Company will be on campus the first week of school to take orders. 

Ro om Decoratio n. A damage charge is likely when articles are tacked, 
taped, fastened, or pasted with stickers to the walls, furniture, 
doors, or fixtures resulting in damage. Jiffy hooks may be used 
only in those dorms without picture moldings in the walls. Special 
hangers for use with the picture moldings are available in the 
Bookstore. Use of scotch tape is permitted only in Barclay. 

Painting of Rooms . Dormitories are painted on a regular schedule. 
Excessive damage to the painting that requires either repainting 
or washing will result in a charge to the student. Students are 
not allowed to paint their rooms. 

Damages . The resident of each room is responsible for any damage 
to his room or its contents, including windows, doors, and furniture, 
whether he is present or absent when the damage occurs. He may 
notify the Buildings and Grounds Office of the name of the person 
responsible for the damage. 



Students' Guide 1971-1972 

New occupants of a room should report in writing all existing 
damages to the Buildings and Grounds Office. All rooms are inspected 
prior to occupancy in the fall and existing damages noted. All 
damages which are not allocated to a particular individual or group 
will be apportioned among all members of the student body. A list of 
common charges is available in the Buildings and Grounds Office. 

Repairs . Faulty equipment, trouble with heat, light, or water, and 
damages should be reported to the Buildings and Grounds Office or to 
the dorm keymaster as soon as discovered. 

Maid Service and Linens . The College does not provide maid service or 
a linen supply. Efforts are being made to organize a student-run 
linen concession, but students should be prepared to furi-ish their 
own sheets and pillowcases . Students are asked to keep their rooms 
in reasonably orderly condition. Rooms left in a chaotic condition 
at the end of the year will be cleaned by the College, and the cost 
of such cleaning charged to the students involved. 

Storage . Designated dormitory storage sections will be open on 
certain days at the beginning and end of the academic year. At other 
times students wishing to arrange for opening of storage areas should 
contact the keymasters of the dormitories involved. If the keymaster 
cannot be located, students must contact the Security Department 24 
hours in advance to gain access to storage areas. Graduating 
students and others leaving the College are not permitted to store 
any articles. The College accepts no responsibility for loss or 
damage due to theft, fire, or any other cause. 

In the past many students have had valuable items stolen or 
damaged during vacations, both in the academic year and during the 
summer. We strongly recommend that NO valuable items be stored in 
the dorm storage areas. 

Weapons . Firearms and other dangerous weapons are not permitted on 
the campus . 

Fire . Tampering with fire alarms, fire fighting equipment, and 
blocking fire doors are serious offenses. These and other actions 
which create hazards to the safety of others may result in a student's 
being asked to live off campus as well as charges to cover costs of 
repairing and reactivating the equipment. 

Pets. Students are allowed to keep pets on campus, subject to the 
rules of POOH (Pet Owners' Organization of Haverf ord) . If damage to 
the campus and destruction of wildlife continues unabated in the 
coming year, pets will no longer be permitted on campus. Following 
is a brief digest of POOH regulations concerning student pets: 

1.) All pet owners are required to register their pets with POOH 
and show proof of rabies and/or distemper inoculation within the 
last year. 



Students' Guide 1971-1972 



2.) All pet owners must pay a $5 registration for their first 
pet and $3 per additional pet to cover operational costs of POOH, 
including registration tags. They are to be worn by the pet at all 
times on his collar in addition to a small bell intended to warn 
wildlife. This fee also covers the cost of room inspections by POOH 
representatives and the housekeeping staff at the end of each 
semester. 

3.) All pet owners must agree to abide by the decisions of a 
POOH jury or its central committee in the event that the pet be- 
comes a campus nuisance. Should any pet owner refuse to honor this 
pledge, the rules of the Honor Code regarding confrontation will 
apply. 

4.) Arrangements for boarding pets must be made for vacation 
periods; cat boxes must be kept clean and sanitary; all diseased 
animals must be treated soon after becoming infected (a list of 
local veterinarians can be obtained from POOH) . 

5.) All dogs must be accompanied by their owners when outside. 
Pet owners must realize that any member of the community bothered 
by pets running loose is entitled to call the pound; these in- 
dividuals, however, are requested to notify POOH after taking such 
an action so that the pet's owner can be told of his whereabouts. 

6.) Every POOH member will spend a certain period of time 
acting as POOH proctor for the dormitory in which he resides. 
The POOH proctor will be responsible for rectifying all pet- 
related problems in the dorm. 

Grounds . Students should recognize that only cooperation by every- 
one will preserve the beauty of the grounds. Organized games 
should be played behind Barclay or on the athletic fields. 

Security . Efforts are made to protect the security of residents' 
rooms and storage areas, but the College is not responsible for 
losses due to theft or other causes. Rooms and windows should 
be locked; Theft should be reported immediately to the keymaster 
and the Security Department. Strangers wandering through dorms or 
other buildings should be questioned or reported to the Security 
Department immediately. 

Housekeeping Inspections. College employees may enter students' 
quarters during normal working hours to perform necessary main- 
tenance. Employees will try to give advance notification before 
entering students' quarters. 

Items prohibited by College regulations which are visible 
during housekeeping or Students' Council inspection may be con- 
fiscated. The student will be notified by campus mail; items will 
be held in the Security Department. The student may appeal within 
48 hours of receipt of notification. 



Students' Guide 1971-1972 



Routine room inspections will be limited to vacation periods. 

The Students' Council has the right at any time to conduct a 
search entailing investigation beyond what is visible. A Council 
member and a College official must be present for all searches. 

Insurance . The College is not responsible, directly pr indirectly, 
for loss or damage to any article of property anywhere on the campus 
due to fire, water, elements, theft, or action of third parties. 
Students may wish to carry insurance against loss or damage of 
personal property. The College offers fire insurance coverage on 
property of students on a blanket policy. Students families often 
have homeowners' policies which cover their possessions at college 
up to $1,000. 

Meeting Rooms . The Students' Council Room in Union (or in the new 
Student Center) may be reserved through the Council secretary 
for meetings of campus organizations. Other meeting rooms can be 
reserved through Mrs. Henry's office on the first floor, of Founders 
Hall. 

Calendar Coordination . Campus organizations should be in touch with 
Mrs. Henry's office regarding calendar planning and room and time 
reservation. 

Music Practice Rooms . Practice rooms and pianos are available for 
students' vocal or instrumental practice. Interested students 
should contact the chairman of the Music Department. 

Ganib ling . Gambling is not permitted. 

Smoking . Members of the community are asked to observe carefully 
the "No Smaking" regulations in campus auditoriums and other 
designated areas . 

Concessions . The privilege of selling on campus is reserved for 
students. The Students' Council awards concessions. When a student 
sales representative cannot be found, outside firms must have written 
permission from the Dean of Students in order to sell on campus. 
Unauthorized persons anywhere on campus should be reported promptly 
to a member of Students' Council or the Security Office. 

Use of the College's Name . No student organization or individual 
student may enter into any contractual agreement using the name of 
the organization or of the College without prior approval by the 
College through the Dean of Students. 

Change of Home Address . Each Student must keep the College in- 
formed of his home address. Any change in a student's home address 
should be reported immediately to the Recorder. 



students' Guide 1971-1972 



MOTOR VEHICLES 



Motor Vehicle Registration . Students wishing to possess or operate 
a motor vehicle on campus must register the vehicle with the College. 
Any student may register a car with the exception of resident first- 
semester freshmen and students receiving financial aid. Students 
receiving aid who need a car for employment purposes must have 
permission from Mr. Ambler. 

Registration Procedure . A student should register his vehicle with 
the Buildings and Grounds Department. The registration fee for cars 
is $30 per year. The fee for motorcycles is $20 per year. The fee 
for additional vehicles is $15 per car and $10 per motorcycle. 
There is no additional charge if a student changes cars during the 
year, but the change must be reported. 

At registration the student must present proof of ownership 
and the name of the insurance company and the number of the policy 
under which he has liability insurance. A temporary permit will 
be issued when insurance or other information is incomplete. Cars 
must be registered within one week of the opening of the academic 
year. Cars brought on campus later must be registered within one 
weekday of arrival. 

Haverford and Bryn Mawr students participating in the dormi- 
tory exchange program are subject to the motor vehicle regulations 
of the host campus. 

Temporary Registration . A student may have a car at Haverford for 
up to three days if he secures a temporary registration permit at 
no charge from the Buildings and Grounds Office. 

Parking . Parking is permitted at any time (except in designated 
reserved spaces) in the Field House lot and along Carter Road, 
Walton Road, and Hall Drive. 

The Security Department upon reqest will assist a student 
with starting a disabled car or in moving it to an appropriate 
location. Inoperable cars are not allowed on the campus, nor are 
extensive repairs to be carried out here. 

Decals . Car owners should place the College registration decal 
on the left side of the rear bumper. Defective decals will 
be replaced without charge. Decals are not transferable from 
one vehicle to another and must be removed after change of 
vehicle ownership. 

Safe Driving . The campus speed limit is 15 miles per hour. 
Vehicles must be fully muffled. Cars are allowed on regular 
campus roads only. They may never be driven on paths or lawns 
except by prior written permission from the Security Department. 



Students' Guide 1971-1972 

Enforcement and Fines . The person in whose name a vehicle is 
registered is responsible for any violations charged to it. 
Violation notices and fines are forwarded by mail, and if possible, 
by notice left on the car windshield. Warnings are not given. 

Fines are: 

Failure to register a vehicle $15 

Speeding or reckless driving $20 

Driving or parking on lawns $20 

All vehicles parked in unauthorized places will be towed away 
as indicated on posted notices. They will be towed to an off- 
campus location. Operators of towed vehicles should immediately 
see the Security Department. Ordinarily, a cash payment of $20 
will be required at the service station to which the vehicle has 
been towed. The College receives no part of this fee. 

Driving while intoxicated will result in automatic loss of 
driving privileges. 

Bicycle Registration . The College asks that all campus bicycles be 
registered with the Security Department. There is no cost involved 
for the owner. Registration of bikes is essential to efforts to 
retrieve lost or stolen bikes, and to avoid mistakingly identifying 
bikes as abandoned. 

FOOD SERVICE 

Service . Service is cafeteria style. Seconds are usually avail- 
able. All diners are asked to return their trays to the designated 
areas . 

Meal Hours . The Dining Center's regular meal hours are: 

Breakfast Lunch Dinner 

WEEKDAYS 7:30-9 a.m. 11:30 a.m.-l p.m. 5-7 p.m. 

SATURDAYS 7:30-9 a.m. 11:30 a.m.-l p.m. 5-6:30 p.m. 

SUNDAYS Brunch, 10 a.m.-l p.m. 5-6:30 p.m. 

On Mondays through Saturdays, continental breakfast will be 
served from 9 until 9:30 a.m. 

The Dining Center will not be open when the College is not 
in session. 

Check-In . Students are asked to give their names to the checker 
as they pick up their trays. Guests mat pay at this time. 

Guest Meal Rates . 

Breakfast $ .90 

Lunch $1.10 

Dinner $1.50 

7 



students' Guide 1971-1972 



Private Dining Room Reservations . There are several small dining 
rooms which can be reserved for meetings and private and College 
functions. They should not be used for classes or seminars. 

These dining rooms may be reserved on 48 hours notice through 
Mr. Grant's office in the Dining Center. There is no charge for 
use of the room if the meal is to be served, and arrangements for 
the cost of the meal itself are to be worked out with Mr. Grant. 

If diners are to carry their trays to the room, the rates for 
use of the rooms are: 

Room Capacity Rate 

Sharpless 8 $5 

Smith 20 $5 

Swarthmore 34 $10 

Bryn Mawr 100 $15 

Bryn Mawr-Haverford Meal Exchange . Any Haverford student may eat 
at Bryn Mawr at any time (and vice versa) at no extra cost by 
showing a valid Haverford (or Bryn Mawr) ID card to the dining room 
checker. 

Coop . The Coop will probably reopen under new management this fall. 
Watch for announcements about hours and policies. 

Special Diets . A vegetarian meal is usually available in the kitchen 
for those who notify Mr. Grant of their continuing interest in such 
meals. Other requests for special diets should be given to Mr. 
Grant, who will make whatever arrangements are possible. 

Suggestions . Complaints, criticisms, suggestions, and words of 
praise should be directed to Mr. Grant in the Dining Center or to 
a member of the Dining Center Committee. 



Students' Guide 1971-1972 

COLLEGE POLICIES 

A Statement of Principle About Certain Rights and Obligations . 

Haverford College holds that open-minded and free inquiry is 
essential to a student's educational development. Thus, the College 
recognizes the right of all students to engage in discussion, to 
exchange thought and opinion, and to speak or write freely on any 
subject. To be complete, this freedom to learn must include the right 
of inquiry both in and out of the classroom and must be free from any 
arbitrary rules or actions that would deny students the freedom to 
make their own choice regarding controversial issues. Further, the 
College endeavors to develop in its students the realization that as 
members of a free society they have not only the right but also the 
obligation to inform themselves about various problems and issues, and 
that they are free to formulate and express their positions on these 
issues. Finally, the College reaffirms the freedom of assembly as an 
essential part of the process of discussion, inquiry, and advocacy. 
Students, therefore, have the right to found new organizations, or 
to join existing organizations, on or off campus, which advocate and 
engage in lawful actions to implement their announced goals. Student 
actions such as those here involved do not imply approval, disapproval, 
or sponsorship by the College or its student body; neither do such 
actions in any way absolve a student from his academic responsibilities. 
Similarly, students are expected to make clear that they are speaking 
or acting as individuals and not for the College or its student body. 

The freedom to learn, to inquire, to speak, to organize and to 
act with conviction within the bounds of law, are held by Haverford 
College to be a cornerstone of education in a free society. 

Relationship With Law Enforcement Agencies . While the College assumes 
no responsibility for acting as an arm of the lax«i, neither does it 
knowingly afford its students any greater protection from the law than 
that enjoyed by all citizens. In the absence of parents, the College 
does assume an individual responsibility for assuring its students 
equal protection under the law. 

Security Checks . Members of the faculty are often asked by government 
agencies for information about students or former students. This 
fact has led to some concern among the faculty. A special committee 
studied the matter, and submitted a report to the faculty meeting of 
May 19, 1955. The faculty accepted the report "as a series of advices 
to be included in the 'Information for Members of the Faculty'." The 
report is as follows : 

STATEMENT OF THE HAVERFORD COLLEGE FACULTY 
ON GOVERNMENT SECURITY CHECKS 

Chief Justice Holmes once stated that we must retain in 
this country the "free trade in ideas - that the best test 
of truth is the power of the thought to get itself accepted 
in the competition of the market."* Our primary concern 
about the security program of the federal government is 
that students and faculty members should not avoid contro- 
versial topics or unpopular positions for fear that these may 
be held against them in the future. 

9 



students' Guide 1971-1972 

The basic assumption of the security program is that the 
government has a right to, and indeed must, protect itself 
from disloyalty and subversion. Ascertaining the loyalty 
of any individual or the possibility of future acts of 
subversion by him, however, is fraught with danger. Under 
present security regulations it inevitably involves con- 
siderations of beliefs or opinions of both the person being 
investigated and the person being asked for information.** 
We must consider carefully what information should make us 
question a man's loyalty or think of him as a possible 
security risk, and what information we should pass on to 
security investigations. 

Let us first look at two general considerations, apart 
from any special features which may exist because of the 
nature of an academic community. First, the spoken or 
written word or the reading or studying of certain 
materials is far removed from actions . To act requires 
more than intellectual assent. Often we may not know 
what we believe until we are challenged to act upon our 
beliefs. Second, few people reveal to others their 
deepest thoughts and feelings; and even when they do, 
opinions which are voiced are easily misinterpreted. 

In addition to these two general considerations, there are 
certain special features of a college education which must be 
taken into account in arriving at judgments of loyalty or 
riskiness of members of the college community. One of the 
aims of education at college is to question and shake opinions 
and beliefs previously arrived at largely from knowledge and 
experience of others and to form opinions which have been 
tested by the individual himself. The student is exposed 
to new ideas put forth by faculty members, by other students, 
or in reading, and has four years in which to find himself, 
before taking a responsible position in society. During four 
years he is asked to look with an open mind at different 
theories and philosophies. He is also encouraged to try out 
ideas in experience. Many students go through a series of 
divergent yet passionately held philosophical convictions 
while at college. They may defend each strongly, this being 
one way of testing it. The espousal by some students in 
discussion or papers of ideas considered subversive outside 
the campus, must therefore be recognized as normal activity 
in a college. 

Indeed, it is the person who has been completely uninter- 
ested in controversial problems when in college who may turn 
in times of crisis to movements advocating treasonable acts 
for lack of training in analysing the claims and social inter- 
pretations of such movements. Experience shows that those 
who tried to understand controversial issues are usually less 
likely to be taken in by panaceas. An active interest in such 
issues may be more a sign of loyalty than ground for question- 
ing a man's loyalty. 



10 



Students' Guide 1971-72 

It follows from what has been said that there must exist a 
special relationship of trust among students and faculty in their 
professional association. Members of the college community 
should feel confident that expressions of their ideas will be 
regarded as strictly professional matter. We believe that 
this relationship of trust is indispensable to a college 
community if it is to serve its proper function in society. 

We believe further that if there is doubt expressed about the 
loyalty of one member of the college community by another, or 
about his safety as a security risk because of his thoughts, 
opinions, or beliefs, as distinct from his character or stability 
of personality, a full statement of the charge should be given in 
writing to the investigating authorities, a copy of which should 
go to the person being charged with disloyalty or potential subver- 
sion. 



*The dissenting opinion in Abrams et al V. United States, 
250 U.S. 616 (1919). 

**Some information specifically required in a full field check 
under the existing security program relates to beliefs and 
opinions - for example, "Membership in, or affiliation or 
sympathetic association with, any foreign or domestic organi- 
zation, association, movement, (etc.) which is totalitarian. 
Fascist, Communist or subversive..." In addition, the regula- 
tions state that infomation collected should not necessarily 
be limited to that which is specifically required; in practice 
it may be directly related to opinions or beliefs. 

Relationship With Governmental Investigative Bodies . From time to 
time the Federal Bureau of Investigation or other governmental in- 
vestigative body conducts a security investigation as a step in the 
employment of a student, alumnus, or faculty member in government work. 
Our policy is to cooperate fully in such an investigation. The F.B.I, 
agent has routinely told our security office that he will be on campus 
for this purpose. The College hopes that whatever the agent is told 
is something the interviewee is also prepared to say directly to the 
student, alumnus, or faculty member being investigated. This type of 
investigation should be an open matter (as the above statements from 
the Faculty Handbook make clear) . 

But we will not condone or participate in any undercover investi- 
gation of a College community member, except where the President or 
his deputy is shown reasonable grounds for linking that member with 
a specific crime and where no alternative way exists of gathering 
the necessary facts about the crime. In particular, we will not be 
involved in any undercover searching into the thoughts or teaching of 
a professor, student, or staff member. 

To make this College policy effective, it is imperative that 
there be a check with the President's office before any positive 
action is taken on a request for confidential information about a 
person at Haverford. Anyone on campus who is asked, in his role as 
a member of the College community, for information to be provided 
on a covert basis concerning another member of the community should 
immediately report that request to the President. Any failure to do 
so will be considered a violation of College policy. 

11 



Students' Guide 1971-1972 



STUDENT SERVICES 



Health Services . Students may call at the dispensary or for emergency 
service in the Morris Infirmary at any time. Students seeking routine 
appointments, such as allergy inoculations, are asked to schedule 
appointments during normal working hours. Students who wish to go 
to the Infirmary after 10 p.m. should call the night and weekend 
emergency number, MI 2-3133, first. 

The College physician is available at the Infirmary from 2 to 3 p.m. 
Monday through Friday and will be called by the nurse on duty if needed 
at other times. Visiting hours for patients in the Infirmary end at 
9 p.m. The Infirmary is closed during vacations. 

Counseling Services . The College offers counseling for problems 
of a personal, educational, or vocational nature. Students are 
encouraged to make an appointment with any of the counselors for 
an evaluation. When a problem warrants, a student may be re- 
ferred to another member of the staff, or occasionally to an 
outside source for further help. All student communications 
with the counseling staff are held in strict professional con- 
fidence, as are the names of students counseled. The counseling 
staff consists of a psychiatrist. Dr. Peter Bennett, and two 
clinical psychologists. Miss Jane Widseth and Mr. James Vaughan. 
Appointments should be made at the counseling center on the 
ground floor of Whitall Hall. 

Psychological Testing. The records of the psychological tests 
which each student takes during Customs Week are available in 
the counseling center. Any student desiring an explanation of 
them may ask for an appointment. Students who desire counseling 
in regard to majors or vocational plans may ask to take supple- 
mentary tests of aptitudes, interests, or personality. 

Financial Aid - Scholarships . All scholarships for the current year 
have been awarded. Students should pick up applications for renewal 
of scholarships for 1972-73 early in the second semester. Students 
expecting to receive aid for the first time In 1972-73 should see 
the Director of Admissions early in the second semester. The deadline 
for all financial aid applications for 1972-73 is March 31, 1972. 

Financial Aid - Student Loans . A loan fund is available for students 
who may require financial assistance during their college course. 
Students wishing loan information should see the Director of 

Admissions . 

Financial Aid - Term Time Employment. All but a very few campus 
jobs are reserved for students with established need for funds to 
help offset the education costs of the College. Students wishing 
to take a job on campus first file an application in the Dean of 
Students' Office. In addition to jobs on campus, there are regular 
opportunities for part-time and occasionally steady work off campus. 
All such jobs are listed in the Dean of Students' Office. 

Summer Employment . While there is no summer placement service, 
the Dean of Students' Office does maintain a file of summer jobs 
that have been brought to the attention of the College. 

12 



students' Guide 1971-1972 

Bryn Mawr and Haverford Bus Schedule . The two Colleges jointly operate 
a bus to facilitate cooperative classes, lectures, and library use. 
The bus makes regular trips between the two campuses on weekdays 
when classes are in session. The bus leaves from Stokes Hall at 
Haverford and from Goodhart Hall at Bryn Mawr. 

Leave Bryn Mawr Leave Haverford 



8:00 a.m. 


8:15 a.m. 


8:30 


8:45 


9:15 


9:45 


10:15 


10:45 


11:15 


11:45 


12:15 p.m. 


12:45 p.m. 


1:15 


1:45 


2:15 


2:45 


3:15 


3:45 


4:15 


4:45 


5:15 


5:45 


7:15 


7:45 


9:45 


10:15 


10:45 


11:15 


11:45 


12:15 



Changes or additions to this schedule may be announced in the fall. 
Also, there may be limited car service to Swarthmore in the fall. 

Student groups may charter the Haverf ord-Bryn Mawr bus on week- 
ends provided a regular driver is available. There is an initial 
fee of $9.60 plus $4.80 per hour and 20 cents per mile. The mini- 
mum charge is $35. Inquire at Mr. Trucks' Office at Bryn Mawr. 

Graduate School Catalogs and Information . The catalogs of most colleges 
and universities in the United States are available for loan from 
the Recorder's Office. Announcements of special summer and graduate 
programs of study as well as information about fellowships are posted 
along the stairway leading to the Recorder's Office. 

Selective Service . Students are required by law to register for 
Selective Service on or within five days after their 18th birthday. 
Students on campus can register with the nearest local board in 
Bryn Mawr. 

Since especially at this time Selective Service policies, 
regulations, and procedures are often changing or subject to 
interpretation, all students are urged to keep themselves informed 
and up-to-date on these matters. 

Students wishing general information or advice about the draft 
should talk with Messrs. Lyons, Melton, Potter, or Kannerstein. 
Students considering conscientious objection are invited to consult 
with Mr. Vaughan, Mr. Charles Perry, or Professor John Gary. In 
addition, other members of the administration, faculty, and student 
body are usually able and willing to give advice on a variety of 
draft matters. There are several well-known draft counseling services 
in Philadelphia. 

13 



students' Guide 1971-1972 

Graduate School Advisors . Students planning to do graduate work in 
a departmental subject should consult with the chairman of the depart- 
ment at Haverford. Students planning to go to professional schools 
may seek advice and information from appropriate faculty members 
as follows : 

Education Messrs. Lyons, Melton, Kannerstein 

Business Administration ... Mr. Hunter 

International Affairs .... Mr. Hansen 

Law Messrs. Mortimer and Levin 

Medicine To be announced 

Theology Mr. Luman 

Placement Services . Haverford does not maintain a formal placement 
service. Mr. Sheppard, Director of Alumni Affairs, maintains a list 
of positions open in business, government, and other institutions 
in the Alumni Office in Founders Hall. Interviews with representatives 
of business concerns, government agencies, and institutions can be 
arranged. Students are encouraged to consult members of the faculty 
and administration about possibilities for employment outside of 
College. 

Peace Corps and VISTA . Students interested in applying for the Peace 
Corps or VISTA should talk to Mr. Lyons, the campus liaison officer 
for these organizations. 

Use of Campus Mail Services . Every now and then members of the campus 
community feel compelled to share some wise piece of writing, or some 
announcement of assumed importance with all other members of the 
campus community. The policies regarding such "general distribution" 
materials are simple, and are intended to assure that the origin of 
the material is always an open matter. 

1) The use of the campus mail service, without cost, is restricted 
to members of the College community, i.e., faculty, students, staff, 
Board and Corporation members. 2: EVERY piece that is distributed 
must carry clear explicit identification of who the originator is. 
This means that each piece should carry the name of at least one 
individual who assumes responsibility for the mailing, together 
with the name of the sponsoring organization if any. 3) It is 
expected that no member of the College community will allow his 
name to be used to permit an off-campus commercial organization 
to distribute its advertising material through the College mail 
room without going through the U. S. mail service. The only 
exception to this will be for franchises which have been allocated 
through Students' Council to current students. 

Items Lost, Found, or Stolen . Items that have been lost, found, 
or stolen should be reported to the campus Security Office. The 
security functions of this office are more effective when 
students promptly report items they believe may have been stolen. 

14 



students' Guide 1971-1972 

The Campus Calendar - Registering Campus Events. All campus events 
other than regularly scheduled academic functions and intercollegi- 
ate athletics, are registered in advance in Mrs. Henry's Office. 
This includes events such as social events, mixers, lectures, 
concerts, etc. 

Bookstor e. The Bookstore is located in Union and is open from 
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. Extended hours are 
announced during the beginning of each semester. 

Accident Insurance . Every student is covered by a blanket accident 
policy paid for from the unit fee. This insurance pays actual ex- 
penses resulting from any accident up to a limit of $1,000 for each 
accident. All claims under this policy should be directed to the 
College physician. 

Notary Public . A notary public is provided for the convenience of 
students in the Recorder's Office and in the Business Office. 

Guests . A student can arrange rooms in faculty homes and at Bryn 
Mawr for out-of-town dates. The faculty does not expect remunera- 
tion for this service, but students should observe the following 
suggestions: 1) The faculty host or hostess should be contacted 
as soon as possible. She should be given the name and home address 
of the guest and approximate time of arrival and departure. 

2) The hostess should be kept informed of any changes in plans. 

3) Thank you notes are appreciated. 

Art Rental . The College has a collection of framed prints which 
are rented to students at a very nominal rate. Announcements will 
be made in the fall about when students may make selections from 
this collection. 



15 



Students' Guide 1971-1972 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 



I. The Honor Code 
II. Students' Association Constitution 
III. Student Officers and Appointees 



This is the Haverford Honor Code. We ask that you read it 
carefully, bearing in mind that these are the standards and 
concepts by which the College functions as a community. The 
Standards section is part of the Constitution of the Students' 
Association. The Specific Concerns are reviewed each year at 
the beginning of the second semester. The concerns printed below 
were adopted in a Plenary Session, February 3, 1971. 

Article VI. The Honor Code 

Section I . Standards 

Each student shall accept the Haverford Honor Code realizing 
that it is his responsibility to uphold the Honor Code and the 
attitude of personal and collective honor on which it is based. 

One of the stated purposes of Haverford College is that we 
strive for a sense of community marked by a lasting concern of one 
person for another and by shared responsibilities for helping the 
community achieve its highest aims. The Honor Code, as the founda- 
tion of community life at Haverford College, is the demonstrated 
concern of people for each other. We here attempt to express in words 
the form that these concerns take, while asserting that any such 
statement has meaning for the community only as it forms a basis for 
subsequent action by individuals. 

The goal of the Honor Code is to encourage individuals to 
develop responsible judgment capable of directing their conduct 
as active members of the community. The Code demands that every 
individual in the community be aware of his own standards of 
behavior in relation to the standards of others. Upon entering 
Haverford College, every student must sign the following pledge: 
"I hereby accept the Haverford Honor Code and the attitude of 
personal and collective honor on which it is based." This attitude 
is manifested in confrontation, respect, concern and discretion. 

In its broadest sense, confrontation is communication. A con- 
frontation means subjecting one's beliefs and those of others to a 
new examination. It is not a unique or limited process; it is simply 
the dialogue which logically should occur between persons with 
different standards — an expression of concern and of the need to 
understand the standards of others. A confrontation is not an in- 
quisition, but rather an exchange of values. The process of forming 
personal standards involves both interpersonal and personal confron- 
tation. These standards then form the basis of community at Haverford 
College and provide the necessary standards of community life. 

Respect is the attitude necessary for confrontation to occur 
and entails the recognition of other individuals as members of the 
community. Discretion is the manifestation of respect in one's inter- 
action with others. The fact that an individual is morally at peace 
with his actions does not confer the right to impose their existence 
upon the sensitivities of others. The practice of respect and discre- 

16 



Students' Guide 1971-1972 

tton is not an admission that one's own beliefs are wrong, but rather 
a recognition of and a concern for the community of which one is a 
part. 

The code emphasizes the dual necessity of personal freedom and 
community life. The individual is obligated to make decisions under 
the scrutiny of his conscience, to challenge and accept the challenge 
of others whose views differ from his own, and to modify those 
decisions if it becomes clear that they were made upon an unsatis- 
factory basis. It is imperative that the attitude of personal and 
collective honor not be limited by any rigid definition of the words 
used herein to describe it. The vagueness of these precepts raises 
many questions; but they are healthy questions which must be answered, 
not by the external authority of others, but rather by the individual 
with the help of the concerned individuals who comprise the college 
community. 

Section 2. Implementation 

1. A plenary session of the Students' Association shall be held 
during the first three weeks of the second semester of each year to 
formulate a set of specific concerns to implement the standards of 
the Honor Code. These specific concerns shall help students determine 
the conduct which they must observe under the standards of the Honor 
Code set forth in Article VI, Section 1. Though different Honor Code 
Councils may interpret specific matters pertaining to the Honor Code 
in different ways, only legislative action of a plenary session of 
the Students' Association can maintain or change the details of the 
specific concerns. 

2. Each entering student shall, upon his agreement to enter 
Haverford College, sign the following pledge: "I hereby accept the 
Haverford Honor Code realizing that it is my responsibility to uphold 
the Honor Code and the attitude of personal and collective honor on 
which it is based." 

3. After each of his examinations each student shall sign on 
his examination paper the following pledge: "I accept full respons- 
ibility under the Haverford Honor Code for my conduct on this 
examination. " 

Section 3 . Reporting Procedure 

The student who believes that his actions may be in conflict 
with the principles of responsibility and respect inherent in the 
Honor Code shall discuss the matter immediately with a member of 
the Honor Code Council. Should a student believe that the actions 
of another may be in conflict with the Honor Code, he shall discuss 
the matter immediately with the individual concerned. If after 
discussion either student finds said actions to be in possible conflict 
with the Honor Code, the student whose actions are in question shall 
bring the matter to a member of the Honor Code Council. If the matter 
cannot be resolved on this level, it then comes to the entire Council. 

SPECIFIC CONCERNS 

Arising from personal concerns, there are a number of questions 
that become specific community concerns. An opinion is voiced by 
the community in these particular areas and codified in the following 
sections . 

17 



Students' Guide 1971-1972 



A. Academic Work 



Each student shall be responsible for his proper conduct in all 
scholastic work. 

During examinations: (1) No student shall give or receive aid. 
(2) No person shall act as an official proctor. (3) Students shall 
obey all restrictions which the professor may prescribe as to ta,me, 
place, and material aids to be used. 

In the preparation of papers : (1) A student shall never represent 
another person's ideas or scholarship as his own. He shall indicate 
his sources by using, where appropriate, quotation marks, footnotes 
and a bibliography. (2) Professors may prescribe limitations on the 
sources to be used; waive any restrictions concerning crediting of 
sources. (3) Permission -must be obtained in advance from all pro- 
fessors concerned if a paper is to be submitted for credit in more 
than one course. 

In the preparation of written homework and laboratory reports: 
CI) Students may work together, provided that each member of the 
group understands the work being done. C2) All data must be reported 
by the student as observed in Ms experiment. (3) Professors may (a) 
require that secondary sources consulted be credited. (b) waive any 
restrictions in 1 and 2 of this paragraph. 

Responsibility for observing special requirements: A student is 
responsible for observing any requirements which the professor 
announces under the option specified above. 

B. Social Relations 

Each student shall b-e responsible for his proper conduct with 
respect to guests and the individuals comprising the Haverford College 
community. Any person aware of an act which fails to show proper 
respect is obligated to confront the individual involved. For example, 
students are expected to exercise good judgment as to a reasonable 
hour of departure of guests, taking into consideration the convenience 
of other students and any possible reflection on the reputation of 
tha guest, the individual student, and the College. If confrontation 
does not resolve the conflict, ,. the Reporting Procedure applies to this 
section. 

C . Drugs and' Intoxicant s 

Through, the statement of policy regarding drugs and intoxicants, 
the Haverford student body is trying to prevent the development of 
the many serious problems inherent in the drug phenomenon; a phenom- 
enon present here and on many other campuses. 

Intemperate use of mild drugs and intoxicants, and simple use of 
dangerous and powerful drugs, are acts which often have interfered 
with, a student's primary roles at the College: disciplined involve- 
ment in scholarship and healthy personal development. There is ample 
evidence that individual s-tudents have been seriously hurt by drugs. 
The medical and psychological services are not intended for long- 
term treatment of students who become severely abnormal or impaired 
because of drug use of other causes. 

The drug phenomenon also interferes with the maintenance of a 
free and healthy campus community. State laws make it illegal for 
minors to possess or consume alcoholic beverages. A variety of State 
and Federal laws prescribe severe penalties for the use or possession 
of dangerous drugs and narcotics. Marijuana is legally considered to 
be a narcotic. 

18 



Students' Guide 1971-1972 

The College assumes no responsibility for acting as an arm of 
the law. Neither will it knowingly interfere to protect students 
from law enforcement activities or their consequences. In the 
absence of piirents, the College does assume an initial responsibility 
for assuring its students equal protection under the law. 

The sometimes unduly severe sanctions of the larger society make 
many students fearful of openly (and lawfully) discussing drugs and 
drug-related issues . This is at a time when the issues and related 
personal beliefs all need full and open discussion. 

Certain drug-related activities almost always violate the 
collective sense of respect for the welfare of the community, and 
for the rights and welfare of the individuals within it. Because 
of this, each member of the community is obliged personally to con- 
front these queries: 

(1) Do my actions involve non-students in drug use or distribu- 
tion either on or off the campus? 

(2) Do my actions involve the use of addictive and/or especially 
dangerous drugs such as the opiates, heroin, amphetamines, barbitur- 
ates, or potent hallucinogens? Do they constitute abuse, by frequent 
use or excessive dosages, of potentially dangerous drugs such as 
cannabis or alcohol? 

(3) Am I facilitating in any way an unwise choice by another 
student to use drugs; a choice based on ignorance of the full legal 
and medical (and therefore academic) risks involved? 

(4) Am I party to, or aware of, any drug-related activity 
which exposes the College to the risks of outside intervention; an 
intervention which would threaten the development of the openness 
and trust necessary to curb drug abuse within our community? 

(5) Have I taken care to assure by forthright discussion that 
my drug-related activities are not offensive to others? That they 
have not jeopardized the rights of others? 

(6) If I have been offended or jeopardized by the drug-related 
activities of another student, have I made reasonable efforts to 
discuss my concern with him in a friendly and forthright manner? 

(7) Where the propriety of my drug-related actions , or those 
of another, is still in question after discussion, have I sought the 
counsel of other students, the appropriate officers of the Students' 
Association, or the Administration? 

The Reporting Procedure clause of the Honor Code applies to 
this section. 

EXPLANATION OF THE TERM "QUERY" 

Queries come out of Haverford's Quaker traditions and practices. 
A query challenges the community and individuals to examine their 
actions and attitudes. Specific queries arise out of the community's 
concern over problems which have led to conflict in the community 
and harm to individuals. Each Haverford student is obligated to 
confront personally the standards expressed in these queries. 

ADMINISTRATION OF THE HONOR CODE 

Any student brought before the Council for discussion of a 
possible breach of the standards of the Honor Code is considered 
individually. The Students' Association, in granting certain 
judicial powers to the Council, recognizes each person and each 
incident as having unique characteristics. Consequently, flexi- 
bility of evaluation in an Honor Code discussion is necessary if the 
rights and freedoms granted by the Honor Code are to be preserved 
and guaranteed. 

19 



Students' Guide 1971-1972 

The Honor Code Council has responsibility for maintaining the 
Honor Code and for responding to actions inconsistent with it. In 
situations involving the section on Drugs and Intoxicants, however, 
the First Vice-President and the Dean of Students are delegated initial 
responsibility. When any possible breach of responsible conduct 
which seems to require further action comes to the attention of the 
Honor Code Council, the representatives who comprise it shall dis- 
cuss the relative seriousness of the matter and agree on how it best 
should be handled. Discussion with the student or students involved 
is often sufficient. If not, the problem comes to an Honor Code 
Jury of 12 students. 

Disciplinary action which may limit a student's freedom, or even 
separate him from the College, is taken only when it is clear that 
discussion alone is not sufficient to resolve the difficulty and 
that action is called for to protect the community and the individuals 
who comprise it from serious damage. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION OF HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

Article I. Preamble 

Section 1. Name 

The name of this Association shall be the Students' Association 
of Haverford College. 

Section 2. Membership 

All students enrolled at Haverford College are ipso facto members 
of the Students' Association. 

Section 3. Powers 

All powers herein defined derive from the Students' Association 
and are delegated by it to such bodies of its own creation as are 
needful to carry out the functions of student self-government. 

Section 4. Right of self-government 

The right of student self-government is granted by the Administra- 
tion of Haverford College to the Students' Association provided that 
the Students' Association maintains the standards of the College to 
the satisfaction of the Administration. 

Article II. Legislative Powers 

Section 1. Regulations and Council Rules 

1. The Students' Association shall make Regulations governing 
the conduct of students on campus. Regulations pertaining to the 
Honor System shall be enacted by a two-thirds vote of a meeting of the 
Association. Every member of the Association is responsible for en- 
forcement of these regulations. Should the Administration find any 
regulation unacceptable, the dispute shall be referred to three re- 
sponsible and impartial persons, satisfactory to the Association and 
the Administration. 

2. The Students' Association delegates such legislative authori- 
ty to the Students' Council as is necessary to carry out the functions 
of the Council herein provided for. Such legislation shall be well- 
publicized and shall be reported to the members of the Asso cLation 

at hall meetings, provided for in Article III, Section 9. The students' 
Association reserves to itself the ultimate legislative authority, 

20 



Students' Guide 1971-1972 
to be exercised only in plenary session. 

Section 2. Meetings or the Association 

1. The Students' Association shall meet in plenary session 
within the first three weeks of &ach semester. 

2. The President of the Students' Association shall call a 
plenary session of the Students' Association whenever he deems it 
necessary by publicizing it as far in advance as possible of the 
time scheduled for the plenary session. The number of students re- 
quired for a quorum shall be forty per cent of the Students' Association. 

3. The President shall call a plenary session of the Association 
in the manner provided for in paragraph 2 of this section whenever 

he receives a petition signed by ten per cent of the members of the 
Association stating the purpose for which^ the plenary session shall be 
called. Such plenary sessions shall be held within seven (7) days of 
the receipt of the petition. 

4. The President shall publicize the agenda of any plenary 
session as far in advance of the meeting as possible. 

5. The "Haverford Rules of Parliamentary Procedure" shall be the 
authorized and final guide in all parliamentary procedure except 
wherein it conflicts with the Constitution of the Students' Association 
or the Regulations of the Students' Association. The President of the 
Association shall appoint, upon assumption of office, a Parliamentar- 
ian from the members of the Students' Counil. The Secretary of the 
Students' Association shall have with him at plenary sessions of the 
Association a copy of the "Haverford Rules of Parliamentary Procedure". 

Article III. Executive Powers 

Section 1. Students' Council 

The executive power of the Students' Association is vested in a 
Students' Council. 

Section 2. Membership of the Students' Council 

The members of the Students' Council shall be the officers of 
the Students' Association, elected dormitory representatives, and the 
elected off-campus representatives. 

Section 3. Meeting of the Students' Council 

The President of the Students' Association shall call a meeting 
of the Students' Council at least once each month. A quorum of the 
Council shall consist of two-thirds of the membership. Upon the 
written request of at least five members of the Students' Council, an 
official meeting of that body shall be called immediately. Legisla- 
tive and executive sessions of the Students' Council, except those 
concerned exclusively with appointments and awards, shall be public. 
The agenda for Council meetings shall be well-publicized as soon as 
possible before each meeting. 

Section 4. Nomination and Election of Officers in the Executive 

Committee of the Students' Association 

1. Nominations for the offices of the Executive Committee — 
President, First Vice-President, Second Vice-President, Secretary, and 
Treasurer — of the Students' Association shall open on the second 
Friday of the second semester and shall close on the following Tuesday. 
Nominations for the offices of President and of First and Second 
Vice-Presidents shall be restricted to members of the Junior Class; 

nominations for the offices of Secretary and Treasurer shall be 

21 



Students' Guide 1971-1972 

restricted to members of the Freshman and Sophomore Classes. Should 
there be more than four (4) candidates nominated for any officer, 
there shall be a primary election for that office on the Monday 
following the close of nominations, to be conducted according to 
the preferential system. Space shall be provided for write-in votes. 
The four (4) highest candidates shall then enter the final election 
for that office. 

2. On the Monday following the third Friday of the second semes- 
ter, the Students' Association shall vote by secret ballot to elect 
officers of the Students' Association. Voting shall be held according 
to the preferential system; space shall be provided for write-in 
votes. If, for any reason, more than one election is required to 
secure a valid vote, or if a primary election is necessary, subsequent 
voting shall be called for by the Executive Committee within twenty- 
four hours of the previous voting. Votes must be cast officially by 
at least forty per cent of the membership of the Students' Association 
for the election to be valid. 

Section 5. Election of Representatives 

Each Haverford dormitory (presently Barclay, Comfort, Gummere, 
Jones, Leeds, Lloyd, and Lunt) shall be entitled to one representative 
on the Students' Council. Students residing off the main Haverford 
campus shall be entitled to representatives as stipulated by the 
Students' Council. Representatives to the Students' Council shall be 
elected from each constituency by preferential ballot within the first 
three weeks of the first semester, the date to be specified by the 
President of the Sti.idents' Association. 

Section 6. Nomination and Election of Members of the Honor 
Council of the Students' Association 

1. Nominations for members of the Honor Council shall open on 
the Tuesday following the third Friday of the second semester and 
shall close on the following Friday. The Freshman Class shall elect 
three (3) freshmen, the Sophomore Class three (3) sophomores, and the 
Junior Class one (1) junior to serve with the President and First 
Vice-President on the Honor Council. 

2. On the Monday following the close of nominations, each class 
shall vote by secret ballot to elect its members of the Honor Council. 
Voting shall be held according to the preferential system of voting. 
Votes must be cast officially by forty per cent of the membership of 

a class for the election to be valid. 

3. Within two weeks following the selection of Hall Representa- 
tives, the exact date to be specified by the officers of the Students' 
Association, the Freshman Class shall elect three (3) freshmen to 
serve on the Honor Council. 

4. The officers of the Students' Association shall have final 
authority over the procedure for all elections. 

Section 7. Assumption of Office 

1. The officers of the Students' Association elected in the 
manner provided for in Section 4 of this article shall assume office 
on the fourth Sunday of the second semester. 

2. The members of Students' Council, elected as specified in 
Section 5 of this article, shall assume office immediately upon 
election . 

22 



Students' Guide 19 71-19 72 

3. The members of the Honor Council of the Students' Association 
elected in the manner provided for in Section 6 of this article shall 
assume office on the day they are elected. 

Section 8. Duties of the Students' Council of the Students' 
Association 

1. The Students' Council shall supervise the Regulations legis- 
lated by the Students' Association, all extra-curricular activities 
with the exception of athletics, and perform other duties as herein 
provided. 

2. The President of the Students' Association shall preside at 
all plenary sessions of the Association and at all meetings of the 
Students' Council. He shall conduct the election of officers of the 
Students' Association and shall certify and publish the results of 
these elections, specifying the names of candidates nominated or 
elected. Each year he shall supervise the presentation of the system 
of student self-government to the Freshman Class. In the absence of 
either of the Vice-Presidents, the Secretary, or the Treasurer from any 
plenary session, the President shall appoint from the other members 

of the Council a Vice-President, Secretary, or Treasurer pro tempore . 
He shall serve as a member of the Honor Council. He shall nominate, 
with the concurrence of the Students' Council, student representatives 
to faculty-student committees, and Students' Council committees. 

3. The First Vice-President of the Students' Association shall 
serve as Chairman of the Honor Council. If the office of President 
is vacant or if the President is absent from any plenary session of 
the Association or meeting of the Council, the First Vice-President 
shall act as President pro tempore . 

4. The Second Vice-President of the Students' Association shall 
serve as coordinator of all faculty-student and Students' Council 
committees. He shall bear primary responsibility for drawing up the 
agenda for each Council meeting and for publicizing it before the 
meeting to the Councilmen and the rest of the student body. He shall 
also be responsible for soliciting committee reports and for summar- 
izing them periodically in a report to the Students' Council. 

5. The Secretary of the Students' Association shall keep in 
permanent form minutes of all plenary sessions of the Association and 
of all meetings of the Council. He shall publicize the minutes of 
all plenary sessions and of all Council meetings. 

6. The Treasurer of the Students' Association shall disburse the 
funds of the Students' Association and shall keep a permanent record 
of all transactions. He shall appoint from the Students' Council an 
Assistant Treasurer. When retiring from office, he shall post or 
publish for the inspection of the members of the Students' Association 
a summary of his accounts. 

Section 9. Duties of Students' Council Members 

1. The council representative shall hold dorm meetings to dis- 
cuss the issues on the agenda of each Council meeting. He shall be 
responsible for communicating the views of the members of his dormitory 
to the Council or any of its committees. He shall discuss any action 
of Council or its committees with the members of his dorm. He shall 
participate in the Council to make all policy decisions, to appoint 
all committee members, to allocate the budget, and to do all such 
things as the Students' Council may be empowered to do. 

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Students' Guide 1971-1972 

Section 10. Duties of the Honor Council of the Students' 

Association 

1. The Honor Council of the Students' Association shall adminis- 
ter all aspects of the Honor Code, including judicial power herein 
described and the responsibilities of interpretation of specific 
matters pertaining to the Honor Code. Each year, the Honor Council 
shall present the Honor Code to the Freshman Class. 

Section 11. Committees 

1. Each students' Council shall have the power to establish 
such committees as it deems necessary to aid in the execution of its 
duties . 



Article IV. Judicial Power 

Section 1. Honor Code Jury 

The judicial power of the Students' Association Is vested in the 
Honor Code Jury. 

Section 2. Membership 

The membership of the Honor Code Jury shall include four members 
of the Honor Code Council, including the First Vice President, and 
three others to change each time the Honor Code Jury is called into 
session. Membership in the Honor Code Jury shall also include eight 
other students . These eight shall be chosen when needed by lot from 
a pool of 50 eligibles. The 50 eligibles shall be chosen each month, 
by lot, from the Students' Association, by the President of the 
Students' Association. Each student called to service on the Honor 
Code Jury shall be expected to serve. Exceptions may be granted by 
the First Vice President at his discretion. The First Vice President 
shall serve as chairman of the Honor Code Jury. 

Section 3. Functions 

The Honor Code Jury shall meet when called by the Honor Code 
Council to consider matters of application of the Honor Code to 
particular cases or issues when more personal and individual attempts 
as specified in the Reporting Procedure of Article VI, Section 3 of 
this Constitution have failed. The Honor Code Jury shall discuss the 
matter in question with all individuals involved, and among its own 
membership, and respond with the course of action which it believes 
most beneficial to the individual and to the community at large. 

Section 4. Scope of Action 

1. The Honor Code Jury shall take action within such limits as 
the Students' Association may prescribe. 

Section 5. Rights of Those Appearing Before Honor Code Jury 

1. An individual appearing before Honor Code Jury has the right 
to petition Honor Code Jury to exclude any of its members from the 
consideration of his case; the right to bring with him any other per- 
sons of his choosing; and the right to publicize his own case as he 
sees fit. 

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Students' Guide 1971-1972 
Article V. Resignation and Removal of Officers and Representatives 

Section I. Vacancies 

1. In the event of the resignation or removal of an officer 

of the Students' Association, the Association shall fill immediately 
the vacancy with a member of the appropriate class according to the 
election procedure specified herein. In the interim the vacancy 
shall be filled by the pro tempore replacements provided for herein. 

2. Should a vacancy occur among the Students' Council when a 
representative ceases to reside within the dormitory or is elected by 
his class to the Honor Council or is elected by the Students' Associa- 
tion as one of its officers, or resigns or is removed from office, the 
vacancy shall be filled immediately according to the election procedure 
specified herein. 

3. Should a vacancy occur among the members of the Honor Council, 
it shall be filled immediately by the class whose representation has 
been reduced, according to the election procedure specified herein. 

Section 2. Removal 

1. Any officer of the Students' Association shall be removed 
from any office for malfeasance or neglect of duty or other good cause 
by not less than a two-thirds vote of a plenary session of the 
Students' Association. The Council shall call a plenary session for 
this purpose at its own discretion or on the petition of ten per cent 
of the Students' Association. 

2. Any Students' Council representative shall be removed from 
office for malfeasance or neglect of duty or other good cause by 
not less than a two-thirds vote of at least forty per cent of the 
members of the dormitory in gene.ral meeting assembled. 

3. Any member of the Honor Council shall be removed from office 
for malfeasance or neglect of duty or other good cause by not less 
than a two-thirds vote of at least forty per cent of the members of 
the class which he represents, to be conducted in a general meeting 
of that class . 

Article VI. The Honor Code (Please see page 16 of this Handbook ) 

Article VII. Student Representatives to the Board of Managers 

Section 1. Definition of Office 

1. By consent of the Haverford Board of Managers, the Students' 
Association is entitled to two representatives to the Board of 
Managers. One representative must be a member of the senior class, 
and the other a member of the junior class. Each member is expected 
to serve a full term of two years. 

Section 2. Nomination and Election 

1. Nominations for the junior position as a student representa- 
tive to the Board of Managers shall open on the second Friday in April 
and close on the following Thursday. 

2. Candidates must be members of the sophomore class upon nomina- 
tion and election. 

3. The election of a representative and his alternate by pre- 
ferential ballot shall be held on the first Monday following the 
close of nominations, with all members of the Students' Association 
entitled to vote . 

4. The alternate, who shall serve in the representative's 
absence, is the candidate receiving the highest preferential votes 

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Students' Guide 1971-1972 

after redistribution of the winner's ballots. 

5. The elected representative and his alternate shall assume 
office upon the opening of the next academic year. 

Section 3. Resignation and Removal from Office 

1. Any representative or his alternate shall be removed from 
office for malfeasance or neglect of duty or other good cause by 

not less than a two-thirds vote of a plenary session .of the Students' 
Association. The Students' Council shall call a plenary session for 
this purpose at its own discretion or upon the petition of ten per 
cent of the Students' Association. 

2. Upon resignation or removal from office, the Students' 
Council shall hold an interim election within two weeks of that 
resignation or removal. The nominees shall be from the class in 
which the vacancy occurs . 



Article VIII, 



Amendments 



Section 1. Proposal 

1. Amendments to this Constitution may be proposed by the 
Students' Council or by action taken in a plenary session of the 
Students' Association called for that purpose. 

Section 2. Ratification 

1. Amendments shall be ratified by a two-thirds vote of a 
plenary session of the Students' Association. 

Section 3. Approval 

1. Amendments shall go into effect upon approval by the President 
of the College. 

Article IX. Previous Constitutions Invalid 

With the enactment of this Constitution all previous Constitutions 
of the Students' Association of Haverford College shall be rendered 
null and void. 

STUDENT OFFICERS AND APPOINTEES 

Executive Committee of the Students ' Association 

Larry Phillips '72, President 
Paul Haagen '72, First Vice-President 
Jim Smalhout '72, Second Vice-President 
Gary Gasper '74, Secretary 
, Treasurer 



Honor Council 



Paul Haagen '72 
Larry Phillips '72 
Lucy Weinstein '72 
Danny Conrad '73 
Dave Fox ' 73 



Chris Wise '73 
Chris Fleming '74 
William Pugh ' 74 
Tom Weisman ' 74 



Three members of the Class of '75 will be elected in the fall. 



26 



Students' Guide 1971-1972 

Students' Council Conunittee Chairmen 

Art Series - Paul Richman '74 
Collection Conunittee - Stan Lacks '74 
Customs Committee - Dave Cotlove '72 

Fred Curtis '73 

Jon Stubbs '74 
Film Series - Bill Levin '72 
Dining Center Committee - Wendell Wylie '73 

Mindy Mitnick '72 

Student Representatives to the Board of Managers (chosen by Students ' 
Council) 

Neil Stafford '73 

one vacancy 

Student Representatives to Faculty Committees 
Administrative Advisory 

Frank O'Haxa '72 

Curt Smith '72 

Jon Tumin '73 

one vacancy 
Community Concerns 

Roger Midgett '72 

Dave Gann '72 

Ben Lentz '73 
Student Standing and Programs 

Carl Freedman '72 

Kendall Martin '73 

one vacancy for Class of ' 74 
Computer Center 

Gene Hodges '73 

Jon Bondy ' 73 
Distinguished Visitors 

Bob Katz '72 

Ghebre Mehreteab ' 72 

Pete Rozental '73 
Educational Policy 

Bill Loughrey '72 

Bill Juch '72 

Chris Wise '73 
Inter-College Cooperation 

Gary Greenspan ' 72 

Tom Wright '73 

Jim Loucky '73 
Physical Property 

Dick Rodeheffer '72 

Roger Easton '72 

Doug Ley '73 

Bob Atwood '73 
Study Group on Governance 

Jim Smalhout '72 

Larry Phillips '72 

POOH Co-Chalrmen 

Peter Hales '72 
Dominique Grossin '73 



27 



Students' Guide 1971-1972 

INDEX 

Accident Insurance 15 

Art Rental 15 

Antennas 2 

Bookstore 15 

Bryn Mawr-Haverford Bus Schedule .... 13 

Calendar Coordination 5 

Change of Home Address 5 

College Policies 9 

Relationship With Law Enforcement 

Agencies 9 

Security Checks 9 

Statement of Principle About Certain 

Rights and Obligations 9 

Concessions 5 

Constitution of the Students' Association 

of Haverford College 20 

Counseling Services 12 

Damages 2 

Fees — Room and Board 1 

Financial Aid 12 

Term-Time Employment 12 

Scholarships 12 

Student Loans 12 

Fird 3 

Food Service 7 

Bryn Mawr-Haverford Meal Exchange . . 8 

Check-In 7 

Coop 8 

Guest Meal Rates 7 

Hours 7 

Private Dining Room Reservations ... 8 

Furniture 1 

Gambling 5 

Guests 15 

Graduate School Advisors 14 

Graduate School Catalogs & Information . 13 

Grounds 4 

Health Services 12 

Honor Code 16 

Housekeeping Inspections 4 

Insurance, College Coverage 5 

Insurance , Accident 15 

Keys 2 

Laundry Equipment 2 

Lost, Found, or Stolen 14 

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students' Guide 1971-1972 



Maid Service 3 

Meal Hours 7 

Meeting Rooms 5 

Motor Vehicles 6 

Decals 6 

Enforcement and Fines 7 

Parking 6 

Registration Procedures 6 

Regulations 6 

Safe Driving 6 

Temporary Registration 6 

Music Practice Rooms 5 

Notary Public 15 

Opening and Closing, College 1 

Painting of Rooms 2 

Peace Corps and VISTA 14 

Pets 3 

Placement Services 14 

Psychological Testing 12 

Registering Campus Events 15 

Repairs 3 

Refrigerators 2 

Residence Halls 1 

Room Assignments 1 

Room Decoration 2 

Scholarships 12 

Security 4 

Selective Service 13 

Storage 3 

Student Government 16 

Constitution of the Students' 

Association 20 

Legislative Powers 20 

Executive Powers 21 

Judicial Powers 24 

Honor Code 16 

Administration 19 

Standards 16 

Implementation 17 

Reporting Procedures 17 

Specific Concerns 17 

Student Loans 12 

Student Officers and Appointees 26 

Student Services 12 

Summer Employment 12 



29 



StudeiLts' Guide 1971-1972 

Use of Campus Mail Services 14 

Use of the College's Name 5 

Telephones 2 

Term-Time Employment 12 

Vacation Residence 1 

Weapons 3 



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